The Conradian : the Journal of the Joseph Conrad Society (U.K.)

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 2, Autumn

Certain Problems on Reading Chance
IN HIS The Politics of Reflexivity, Robert Siegle claims that Chance provides "a means" for discerning Conrad's "critical speculations implicitly in his fiction" (1986: 66). Some readers would hesitate to make such a high claim for this work as an introduction...
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Conrad and the Anxiety of Knowledge
THE INSISTENT HAZINESS and evasiveness of many of Conrad's novels and shorter tales has provoked readers at least as far back as H. L. Mencken and E. M. Forster and generated much comment and complaint. For Mencken there flows through all Conrad's stories...
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Glimpses of an Uncollected Letter of 1899: Conrad to Katherine DeFriese
THE LETTER by Joseph Conrad published here in part was not known to exist when The Collected Letters of Joseph Conrad, Volume 9: Uncollected Letters, 1892-1923 went to press in early 2007. This holograph letter first surfaced at an auction of fine books...
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"Heart of Darkness": The Dream-Sensation and Literary Impressionism Revisited
Critics continue to brood like an implacable force over "Heart of Darkness," a work whose suggestive indefinitiveness seems to cry for analysis even as it resists it. Thousands of pages of exegeses have accumulated, but despite the massive response,...
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His Heart in My Hand: Stories from and about Joseph Conrad's Sons
THE LATE Hans van Marle wrote in July 1979 to his friend and fellow Conradian Mario Curreli:I also have a xerox of a letter from Jessie [Conrad] to one Mr Robertson of 19.7.27 mentioning Borys' irregularities, and I think there's a veiled reference in...
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Setting out for Brussels: Conrad and the "Sepulchral City"
RONALD FIRBANK'S waspish line in his 1915 novel Vainglory, "'I can hardly imagine anyone," Lady Georgia observed, "setting out deliberately for Brussels," finds its flat contradiction in Conrad's life-story. As his correspondence documents, he visited...
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Seven New Conrad Letters, 1902-1921
AS LAURENCE DAVIES, general editor of The Collected Letters of Joseph Conrad, concluded in a recent note introducing a clutch of unpublished Conrad letters, "There is treasure out there, that we know" (2009: 126). And there is also, of course, treasure...
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The Revenge of the Raped Woman: "The Idiots" and Charles le Goffic's le Crucifi;é De Keraliès
CONRAD HIMSELF dismissed his first short story, "The Idiots," as an "obviously derivative piece of work" ("Author's Note" to Tales of Unrest vii). Building on the research of previous scholars, Yves Hervouet has shown how much of it the author derived...
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"These Ignorant and Bumptious Reviewers": F. J. Furnivall in Defence of Conrad
On matters of style swim with the current;on matters of principle, stand like a rock.Thomas JeffersonMATTERS OF STYLE were invariably discussed, but without consensus, in the critical reception of Conrad's early work. Yet the publication of Tales of...
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"You Always Leave Us - for Your Own Ends": Marriage and Concubinage in Conrad's Asian Fiction
THE AMBIGUITIES of human existence in Lord Jim include those of racial difference present throughout the Dutch East Indies. The title of the illustration reproduced here, "A brownie of that enchanted garden that men call Java" (Fig. 1), conveys what...
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