The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture

Articles

Vol. 14, No. 3, Spring

The Green Corn Ceremony of the Southeastern Indians
Corn was the single most important food for the In- dian nations of the Southeastern United States includ- ing but not limited to the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole. Since corn was such a vi- tal part of their food chain, it also played...
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Ancient Chickasaws Wore Cloth
We have all seen the Hollywood movies of Native Americans wearing the same style of native clothing. The women wearing a dress made of deer skin with long fringe swaying with the movement of the wearer, and the men wearing leather leggings and a shirt...
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Vol. 13, No. 2, Fall

Research like a Detective
Everyone has heard family stories at one time or another. Some stories may be about family struggles, marriages, or births. Though documents may be hard to find at times because they were lost or destroyed, most family stories can be easily traced and...
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Government Schooling and Its Effects on Indigenous Cultures: Gender and Environment
Indigenous communities have always had some form of education that helped perpetuate their culture. For the indigenous people living in Sudan, Canada, and the United States, their education was encompassed in their traditions and values, which in turn,...
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Vol. 12, No. 4, Fall

The Chickasaw People and Ways They Used Their Land
Editor's note: The following article was honored in 2010 by the Chickasaw Nation Division of History and Culture as best unpublished article dealing with Chickasaw history or culture.Before the time of removal, Native Americans thrived in every region...
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The Outlaw Statesman: The Life and Times of Fred Tecumseh Waite
The Outlaw Statesman: The Life and Times of Fred Tecumseh Waite. By Mike Tower. (Bloomington, Indiana: Authorhouse, 2007. 237 pp. map, notes, bibliography, index. Paperback $14.49.)When researching about various Chickasaw statesmen, I kept encountering...
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Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907
Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907. (Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press, 2011. ix+156 pp. notes, bibliography, index. $15.00. pbk.) by Wendy St. Jean.Sustaining tribal sovereignty and cultural identity were among the greatest...
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Vol. 12, No. 2, Spring

A Note from Bill Anoatubby
It might be hard to believe, but when the Chickasaw Cultural Center (CCQ opens this summer, it will be the culmination of a 20-year vision. From the very first whispers of a cultural center decades ago, this vision has grown through Chickasaw communities...
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Nannamat Lihochifochitok: CHICKASAW PLACE NAMES AT THE CHICKASAW CULTURAL CENTER
The Chickasaw Cultural Center (CCC), located in Sulphur, Oklahoma, was designed from the outset to reflect the heart and soul of hattak alhihd Chikasha, the Chickasaw people. The CCC is a place for all Chickasaw people to return home to, and to see something...
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Remembering Our Past, Building Our Future: The Chickasaw Cultural Center Time Capsule
Fifty years from now, items donated to a time capsule commemorating the opening of the Chickasaw Culture Center will be opened and its contents revealed to Chickasaws of the future. The event will initiate at the Chikasha Poya Exhibit Center, which will...
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Come to the Museum, Go to the Movies: The Anoli' Theater
Along with the traditional village, spirit forest, and other interactive celebrations of Chickasaw culture and experience, the Cultural Center is home to the Anoli' Theater, designed specifically to showcase Chickasaw movies and movies about subjects...
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Aaimpa' Café
The Chickasaw Aaimpa' Café, Aaimpa meaning "place to eat" will be located in the Anoli' Theater building on the Chickasaw Cultural Center campus in Sulphur, Oklahoma. Like all other buildings on campus, the café features a strong influence of southeastern...
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The Use of Iconography at the Chickasaw Cultural Center
The Mississippian culture dominated the southeastern United States from 800 AD-1 500 AD, and its significance is still revered today at the locations of Cahokia, Moundville, Spiro, and other ancient mound building sites located in Mississippi. The designs,...
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Chikasha Rising: The Chickasaw Cultural Center's Chikasha Inchokka' ("Chickasaw House") Traditional Village and the Renaissance of a People
A clear autumn sky enveloped the village below. Amid the bustling of people enjoying the day's activities, a reverent peacefulness surrounded the village. As the fall breeze gently stirred the air, a group of men sat around a fire cooking pishofa (a...
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The Chickasaw Leaning Pole: Finding Our Home
An Interview with Chickasaw Artisans Wayne Walker and Wayne ScribnerWhen speaking of homes, Chickasaws often talk about many different kinds of homes. They speak about their ancestral family allotments in Oklahoma where grandparents might live, about...
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Hapoyimmi-We All Believe
The opening of the Chickasaw Cultural Center has been a much anticipated event, guaranteed to evoke a number of emotions in each and every one of us. Over the past few months, citizens, employees, and members of the community were asked, "What does the...
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Preservation through Education
The rock building on Broadway Ave. in Ada, Oklahoma, stands serene with only a slight swoosh of passing vehicles carrying their occupants to some destination. The sun is radiant. It's the sort of sunshine that forces a person to squint as they exit their...
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Vol. 12, No. 1, Fall

Editor's Introduction
In this issue of The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, readers will discover two articles of different historical perspectives, and from different times and places. Both articles, however, speak to the breadth and distance in time of Chickasaw...
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A Chickasaw Shipmate: The Bill Kennedy Story, or Life aboard the USS Wedderburn (DD-684)
William "Billy Dan" Kennedy, was the first son born to William Douglas Kennedy, an original Chickasaw enrollee, and EuIa (Morrison) Kennedy, a non-enrolled Choctaw. Bill was born on July 17, 1925, near Ada, Oklahoma, on his mother and father's allotment...
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Chickasaw/Wichita Interactions during the Early Historic Period
Few scholars, lay historians, or Chickasaw tribal members today for that matter, know that the Chickasaw and Wichita Nations possess a long history of friendship and peaceful interaction. The focus of this article is to explore the connections fostered...
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Winnie McNeely Oral History
This is Janet Reubin and I am doing an oral history on Winnie McNeely. It is April the 14th of 2009 and we're in the Community Center in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Let's begin."Okay, my name is Winnie McNeely. I was born on April 9th, 1933. Fm full-blood Chickasaw....
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The Wild Onion Day
The sun was shining bright into Lindsey's room.It reminded her that today was a special day.Today was Wild Onion Day.Lindsey knew she would be sharing the day with one of her favorite people.Grandma Dorothy.Grandma Dorothy was an elder with the Chickasaw...
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Vol. 11, No. 4, Spring

Editor's Note
In this issue of The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, readers will discover the strength and importance of memory Each article and poem that follows are celebrations as well as discoveries, for individuals and collectively as Chickasaws, that...
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Chickasaw Veterans of World War II
The American experience in World War II draws the interest of many, likely because great nostalgia and national identity is attached to the war. Often labeled "The Good War," World War II was, most Americans believed, a necessary fight. The war certainly...
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The Alfred Victor Story: A Choctaw-Chickasaw Family History
Near the end of the French Revolution, as social turmoil in the nation deepened and threats upon the lives of those in certain quarters of French society loomed, one family with the surname of Victor decided to send three young brothers to a safer haven...
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Uncle Allen's Journey
IWilliam Allen Morgan was born in 1901in the Chickasaw Nation, Indian TerritoryHis brother Raymond, my dad, was born in 1903.Dad joined the army and Uncle Allen the navyin 1942, not long after Pearl Harbor,at 39 and 41 years of age.Uncle Allen had never...
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Looting Spiro Mounds: An American King Tuts Tomb
Looting Spiro Mounds: An American King Tuts TombBy David L. Vere Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007. 255 pp. $24.95, paper.Scholars of pre-European contact Native American societies very oftenacknowledge those of the Mississippian period (ca....
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Vol. 11, No. 3, Fall

Editor's Note
Following the Civil War and the era of Reconstruction, tribes in Indian Territory faced another round of invasion and colonization. Reconstruction treaties forced the door open to allow a technological foray that would bring corporate invasions, economic...
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The Chickasaw View of the Railroad: Accommodation, Resistance, and the Demise of Sovereignty
The introduction of the railroad in Indian Territory brought enormous changes for the Chickasaw Nation. As individuals, and as a nation collectively, Chickasaws responded to the changes wrought by railway incursion both through processes of accommodation...
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Benjamin H. Colbert: Legacy of a Chickasaw Rough Rider
Native Americans have often been identified as fierce warriors by numerous observers from both within and outside of tribal societies. Many reasons have been given to explain this characteristic, especially when focusing on modern times. Some fight for...
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Piomingo Day
In 1492"In fourteen hundred ninety-two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. He had three ships and left from Spain; He sailed through sunshine, wind, and rain."In 1492, an Italian sailor named Christopher Columbus, funded by Queen Isabella of Spain, sailed...
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Chikashsha Imithaná (Chickasaw Knowledge)
Spotlight on Chickasaw Language, History, and Culture from the department of Chickasaw StudiesNaní kalló hilhá: The Chickasaw Hard Fish DanceChickasaw people have been singing and dancing from a time beyond memory From our ancient Mississippian forbears,...
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Making Indian Law: The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory
Making Indian Law: The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory by Christian W McMillen New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007. 284 pages. ISBN 978-0-300-11460-7.In Making Indian Law, Christian W McMillen analyzes one of the most important cases...
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Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West
Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West by Ned Blackhawk Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press, 2006. 384 pages. ISBN 978-0-674-02290-4.In Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West, Ned Blackhawk...
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Vol. 11, No. 2, Spring

Editor's Note
National treasures are hard to come by. For a society or nation like the Chickasaw to have not just one, but two, is remarkable indeed. The sixty-year career of Te Ata, the American Indian folklorist, is well known due in part to Richard Green's biography...
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From His Personal Journal during the Spanish American War
IntroductionIn 1898, Colonel Theodore Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the Navy visited Indian Territory to recruit troops for the First Territorial Volunteer Cavalry. A Chickasaw Indian by the name of Benjamin H. Colbert eagerly answered the call...
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"As Tall in Her Moccasins as These Sequoias Will Grow on Mother Earth:" the Life of Ataloa
IntroductionOn March 27, 1896 in Indian Territory, near where today the town of Duncan, Oklahoma, is located, Mary Stone was born. Mary Stone became more famously known as Ataloa.1 According to church records from the early-twentieth century, Ataloa...
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Clayburn Straughn-Master Artist
Clayburn Straughn was born in 1923 and grew up during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Clayburn's mother, Frances Carlton Straughn, was an original Chickasaw enrollee and his great-grandfather came from the Old Chickasaw Nation during the Great Removal...
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Chi Ka Sha Althliha Ha Pomi Ittafaamitok: "Our Chickasaw People Have Always Gathered Together:" Robert Kingsbery's Annual Meeting Photographs 1964-1966
Chickasaw Robert Kingsbery, Jr. was an active participant in the political life of the Chickasaw Nation during the crucial years from the late 1950s into the late 1960s. As an active supporter of Overton James and a member of James' advisory council,...
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"Journey of the Dart Point"
Approximately 7,000 years ago, in an area of North America bordering what is now known as the Llano Estacado, an ancient Paleo-Indian was intensely at work, putting the finishing touches on another hunting dart point. In his short lifetime, he had shaped...
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Boarding School Blues: Revisiting American Indian Educational Experiences
Boarding School Blues: Revisiting American Indian Educational Experiences by Clifford E. Trafzer, Jean A. Keller, and Lorene Sisquoc Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2006. 256 pages. $45.00 cloth; $20.00 paperReview ByS. Matthew DeSpain, University...
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