Monthly Review

Monthly Review is a magazine specializing in Educational topics.

Articles from Vol. 54, No. 8, January

A Planetary Defeat: The Failure of Global Environmental Reform. (Review of the Month)
The first Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 1992 generated hopes that the world would at long last address its global ecological problems and introduce a process of sustainable development. Now, with a second summit being held ten years later...
Global Capitalism and Israel. (Book Reviews)
Jonathan Nitzan and Shimshon Bichler, The Global Political Economy of Israel (London and Sterling, Virginia: Pluto Press, 2002), 407 pages, cloth $75.00, paper $24.95. One of the characteristics of much academic writing is an obsession with theory...
Kicking Away the Ladder: Neoliberals Rewrite History. (Review of the Month)
There is currently great pressure on developing countries to adopt a set of "good policies" and "good institutions"--such as liberalization of trade and investment and strong patent law--to foster their economic development. When some developing countries...
Neoliberalism and Resistance in South Africa. (Review of the Month)
Inside the Transition An aspect of the transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa was inadvertently captured at the opening of the World Economic Forum (WEF) meeting held at the International Convention Centre in Durban, in June 2002,...
Occupation's Mixed Legacy. (Book Reviews)
Eiji Takemae, Inside GHQ: The Allied Occupation of Japan and Its Legacy, translated and adapted by Robert Ricketts and Sebastian Swann with a preface by John W. Dower (New York and London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2002), 751 pages,...
The Philosophy and Politics of Freedom. (Book Reviews)
Raya Dunayevskaya, The Power of Negativity: Selected Writings on the Dialectic in Hegel and Marx, edited by Peter Hudis and Kevin B. Anderson (Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2002), 386 pages, $100.00 cloth; $24.95 paper. August H. Nimtz, Jr.,...
The Political Economy of Intellectual Property. (Review of the Month)
The dramatic expansion of intellectual property rights represents a new stage in commodification that threatens to make virtually everything bad about capitalism even worse. Stronger intellectual property rights will reinforce class differences, undermine...