The Australian Feminist Law Journal

Articles from Vol. 37, December

An Egg Shaped Bowl: Law, Invention, Technology
Abstract.Heideggerean theory read through Foucault would situate law itself as a form of technology, a framing that subjectifies and which (for Foucault) implies an ethical response. A productive complication is added to this picture by certain new approaches...
'A Plural Thing': Inventing a Feminist Brain-Based Subject of Law
Abstract.A brain-based subject of law is emerging, in which neurological processes become a primary means of defining individual choice, behaviour, capacity and responsibility. This paper considers the impact of such a shift in legal subjectivity on...
'Ce Qui Arrive'. Deconstruction, Invention and the Legal Subject of R V R
Abstract. Acknowledging Jacques Derrida's insistent claim that deconstruction 'happens' as a metaphysical occurrence, this article seeks to examine deconstruction's happening to law. Through an examination of the English criminal law case R. v R [1992]...
Myths of Invention: Law and the Ignorance about Genetics
Abstract.This article argues that the modern legal concept of invention is based on an 'ignorance about genetics.' The ignorance about genetics refers in general to the forms of imagination about biological reproduction in western philosophy. Adriana...
The 'Half-Invention' of Gender Identity in International Human Rights Law: From Cedaw to the Yogyakarta Principles
Abstract:This article explores the invention of 'gender identity' in international human rights law. It examines the discursive production of the marginalized sexual subjects of human rights law in order to reveal the restrictive binaries and categories...
The Surprise of Invention: Making Fun of the Statutory
For this special issue of The Australian Feminist Law Journal we asked contributors to critically address questions about law in its relation to, and as, technology through the thematic of invention. Invention, as the late French philosopher Jacques...