American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 49, No. 2, April

A Message to Garcia
On April 9 Lt. Andrew S. Rowan of the U.S. Army embarked on a secret mission to Cuba. War with Spain, Cuba's colonial master, looked imminent, and the Army needed to find Gen. Calixto Garcia, leader of the anti-Spanish rebels. Since Rowan spoke fluent...
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Can't Stop Dancin.' (the Start of the Pop Culture Craze Known as Marathon Dancing, in Which Competitors Would Dance for Days at a Time)(1923: Seventy-Five Years Ago)
On April 1 Americans awoke to find their country in the thrall of a brand-new sport: marathon dancing. The fad had begun in England in early March with an effort of nine and a half hours--a virtual sprint. A pair of doughty Scots immediately did fourteen,...
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Carolina Swoon
It's a question many visitors to North Carolina come away asking: How can one state contain such dazzling variety? From the sandy expanses of the Outer Banks, across the rolling heartland to the Great Smoky Mountains, you will find more to see and...
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Days of Futures Past
On April 3 the Chicago Board of Trade (CBT) held its first official meeting in rented rooms over a flour store on a muddy, unpaved path called South Water Street. Although it would eventually become the country's largest commodities exchange, the...
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Ground Zero
Twice a year hundreds of people make a pilgrimage to the spot where the nuclear age began I am standing where the great blue sky of New Mexico meets the parched white sand of its desert, and where physics changed the course of world history. It is a...
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Maryland: Discover Its Rich History and Culture
Is there any state whose history is more intertwined with that of the United States than Maryland's? Consider: * Annapolis, Maryland's capital, served as the first peacetime capital of the 13 Colonies from November 1783 to August 1784. * "The...
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Out of the Frying Pan: When Irma Rombauer Finally Found a Publisher for Her Famous Cookbook, Her Troubles Began in Earnest
When Irma Rombauer finally found a publisher for her famous cookbook, her troubles began in earnest Every business has its idiosyncrasies. The Christmas-tree business is the world's most seasonal. The commercial-airplane business requires an enormous...
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Redwood Classroom: Eureka, California, Came of Age at the Peak of Our National Infatuation with Architectural Ornament, When Money and Timber Seemed Certain to Last Forever
Eureka, California, came of age at the peak of our national infatuation with architectural ornament, when money and timber seemed certain to last forever I told myself I was going for the trees. Humboldt County, in the northwestern corner of California,...
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Republic of Leaks: Americans Have Been Invading One Another's Privacy for Political Gain since before the Revolution
Americans have been invading one another's privacy for political gain since before the Revolution Everyone following the recent White House sex scandal must have felt the uneasy mixture of titillation and guilt that is always present when reading...
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The Deepest South
Five thousand miles below the Mason-Dixon line, a Brazilian community celebrates its ties to antebellum America I was expecting a dusty old museum or a weed-grown cemetery. Instead I have been dropped onto the set of Gone With the Wind. As I get out...
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The Flowers and the Glory
How a highly historic eighteenth-century Connecticut house learned to live in harmony with a twentieth-century garden that is the only surviving American design of a great British landscape architect The Glebe House in Woodbury, Connecticut, is appropriately...
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The Northern Front
Boston is so bright a beacon of Revolutionary history that it is easy to forget the city played an equally significant role in another civil war. Dara Horn, a Harvard junior, seeks out the moral engine of the Union cause. Time is a viscous fluid, and...
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Traveling Together
Last October We proclaimed Saratoga Springs, New York, the first winner of our annual Great American Place Award. Naturally, the choice of future Great American Places stirred interest among not only our readers but also convention bureaus, mayors,...
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Up the River
On April 21 the 118-foot riverboat Virginia steamed out of St. Louis with a few passengers and a cargo of military supplies. Such departures were commonplace in the bustling river town, yet this one drew attention far beyond the usual circle of waterfront...
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When Old North Was New
On April 15 the Reverend Samuel Myles laid the cornerstone of Christ Church (later known as Old North Church), Boston's earliest surviving house of worship, whose belfry would one day hold the lanterns that sent Paul Revere on his famous ride in 1775....
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Yellowstone through the Back Door
Hidden in the park's southwest corner, the lightly visited Bechler district offers a two-hundred-square-mile wilderness of meadows, hot springs, fantastic rock formations, and an unparalleled abundance of waterfalls When William Gregg, a manufacturer...
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