American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 54, No. 4, August-September

1953: The Warren Court. (Time Machine August/September)
ON SEPTEMBER 30, President Dwight D. Eisenhower named Gov. Earl Warren of California as Chief Justice of the United States. Since the appointment came while the Senate was in recess, Warren took his seat immediately. Confirmation followed by a unanimous...
America's First Iraq: What Happened When We Delivered the Philippines from Tyranny a Century Ago. (in the News)
ALL HAPPY OCCUPAtions may, like Tolstoy's families, be alike; but each unhappy occupation is definitely unhappy in its own way. Of course it is too early to tell which our occupation of Iraq--not to mention Afghanistan--will be. As of this writing,...
America's Highway by the Sea: Touring the Florida Keys along the Overseas Highway. (Advertisement)
The subtropical islands of the Florida Keys were first connected in 1912 when Henry Flagler, co-founder of Standard Oil, extended his Florida East Coast Railroad from Miami to Key West. The railroad was destroyed by a hurricane in 1935, but its bones...
Dances with Wolves. (Screenings)
RELEASED IN 1990 AND NOW AVAILABLE on DVD, Kevin Costner's Dances With Wolves was, incredibly, the first Western ever to win the Academy Award for Best Picture (unless one counts Cimarron, 1931, from the Edna Ferber novel, which is often listed in...
Disunited Nations: Why the UN Was in Trouble from the Start
IN THE MONTHS BEFORE THE WAR TO OVERTHROW SADDAM Hussein, two words kept cropping up in the vocabulary of its opponents: sovereignty and legitimacy. The war, they said, would threaten the sovereignty of an autonomous state (the Baath party's Iraq),...
France and US: The French Helped Us Win Our Revolution. A Few Years Later We Were at War with Napoleon's Navy. the Two Countries Have Been Falling in and out of Love Ever since. Why?
CONGRESS SERVES FREEDOM FRIES, AMERICAN MILITARY wives talk of freedom kisses, vandals in Bordeaux burn and deface a model of the Statue of Liberty. It's a good time to remember that American-French relations have had many ups and downs. The ups include...
From the Classroom to the Community: Service-Learning Ties Academic Lessons to Community Service. (Special Advertising Section)
Americans have long expected schools to equip students with the academic skills they need for success in life. However, research indicates a growing number of Americans agree that in addition to scholastic education, schools have a responsibility to...
Gratitude. (Letter from the Editor)
"WE'VE GOT IT, BUT I DON'T LIKE TO POUR it." The couple next to me at the bar had ordered Gray Goose vodka martinis, and the bartender didn't want to make them. I had no idea what was going on, and neither did the couple. "It's French," the bartender...
"Politically Correct". (Why Do We Say That?)
POLITICALLY CORRECT HAS BEEN ONE OF THE most inflammatory catch phrases of our time and also one of the most resilient. Popularized in the 1970s and the 1980s by the left, the phrase was essentially co-opted by conservatives in the 1990s. Liberal activists...
Telling America's Story: The United States Information Agency Did Not Long Survive the Cold War It Helped Wage. but Today the Lessons It Taught Us May Be More Useful Than Ever
FIFTY YEARS AGO THIS SUMMER THE EISENHOWER ADMINISTRAtion created a unique federal agency, one that most Americans never even knew about. Its name was the United States Information Agency; the reason for its obscurity was that by congressional fiat,...
Terror of Trains: It Was Once as Big as Fear of Flying, and It Helped Show the Way to Psychotherapy and the Modern Treatment of Traumatic Stress
WHEN FOUR AIRPLANES CRASHED IN ACTS OF TERRORISM on September 11, 2001, killing thousands of Americans many of the millions who watched the horror on television made a secret vow: I am not going to step onto an airplane again. They knew this decision...
The Gone Stone Face: New Hampshire's Old Man Is Rubble, but Other Stone Faces Remain. (History Now)
WHEN THE ROCK FORMATION known as the Old Man of the Mountain crumbled into rubble in New Hampshire's Franconia Notch State Park this spring, the entire state went into mourning. How long the outcropping existed is unknown. It is mentioned in local...
The Poultry Queen. (Readers' Album)
ON JULY 19, 1965, REBECCA JOHNSON, WHO had already become known as the poultry queen, celebrated the birth of 1,087 chicks. Her great-granddaughter Joan Combellick sent us the photograph marking this event along with the following explanation: "Rebecca...
"The Sweetest Place on Earth": Milton Hershey Built a Company Town So Pleasant It Became a Tourist Attraction. (History Happened Here)
IN THE "REALLY BIG 3D Show," a 3-D cartoon at the Chocolate World visitors' center in Hershey, Pennsylvania, a despotic film producer hijacks a lecture about the life of Milton Hershey--founder of the town and its eponymous chocolate company and amusement...
"With Mark Twain You Can Get Away with Murder": The Man Who Has Lived with Him Nearly as Long as Samuel Clemens Did Tells Why Twain Still Has the Power to Delight-And to Disturb. an Interview with Hal Holbrook
BEGINNING WITH A LECTURE IN ST. Louis in 1867, Mark Twain's famous career as a public speaker spanned about 40 years. But thanks to his avatar Hal Holbrook, he has gone on amusing and instructing and scolding us for another half-century on stages all...