American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 6, October

Courants, Messengers, and a Plain Dealer
Is your newspaper a Gazette? A Journal? Do you read a Gleaner or a Quill or a Bee? Newspaper names are a catalog of history and motive. Some were chosen because they seem traditional, like Gazette or Journal; others reflect a sentiment of the namer....
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Fair Harbor
"Bounded on the north by crabs, on the east by fresh fish, and on the south by mosquitoes" is how one visitor described an island he loved just off Maryland's Eastern Shore, and with minor shifts of the compass, the description holds good for most...
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Farewell to Taft-Hartley
This spring one of the largest unions in the country, the Teamsters, called a nationwide strike against the trucking industry. Much of the nation's freight moves by truck, and its continuing to do so is vital to the economy. Therefore, any latter-day...
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'I'll Trade You Two John Arkinses for an O.H. Rothaker.' (Newspaper Editors)
It's a bad sign when a company decides that to sell its products it needs to bundle them together with miscellaneous, unrelated goods. It suggests that relations have grown strained between product and customer, that either the product is obsolete...
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Inventing the Interview
It is the fundamental act of contemporary journalism. Washington reporters depend so heavily on it that in most of the stories they write they use no documents at all. Yet the interview is a relatively recent invention. Newspapers in America date...
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Learning to like Baseball
I'VE NEVER LIKED BASEBALL MUCH, IN part because my father has always loved it so. He has been a fan all his life, rooting first for the Cleveland Indians, who were the closest major leaguers to the small Ohio town in which he was raised, and then for...
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My Favorite Baseball Photograph
Turn back to page 86 and you will be there as the local Dartmouth College nine plays Harvard on the green at Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1882. Looking like an early plan for our national capital, this remarkable photograph is baseball for me --an...
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Private Flohr's Other Life
Georg Daniel Flohr, a butcher's son, enlisted at nineteen in the Regiment Royal-Deux-Ponts, a German outfit in the service of France, and came to America in 1780 with the Comte de Rochambeau's army to help the Continentals in their struggle against...
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Queen Marie
Born to Csar Alexander II's daughter and Victoria's son, the Duchess of Saxe, Duchess Royal of Coburg-Gotha, Princess of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, Princess Royal of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen of Romania, when she arrived in America on October...
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Sea Dogs
SAILORS HAVE BEEN TAKING DOGS TO SEA SINCE A PAIR OF canines shipped out with Noah. Nevertheless, the picture of the floppy-eared poodle, looking as jaunty and confident as the young submariners who surrounded her, surprised me. What was the dog's...
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The Front Page
I first met the writer whose essay on the American press dominates this issue one afternoon more than twenty years ago. I'd recently joined the staff of American Heritage, and he had just been hired to start a sister publication called Americana. "I'm...
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The Heritage Traveler
ARIZONA In 1846 the first American flag was hoisted over Tucson. Seven years later the last of the territory of Arizona passed from Mexican to American hands with the completion of the Gadsden Purchase. Almost sixty more years were to pass, however,...
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The Picture Snatchers
In 1928 the New York Daily News recruited Tom Howard, a Chicago Tribune photographer who was unknown to New York law-enforcement authorities. His assignment: Penetrate the death chamber at Sing Sing prison--off limits to cameramen--and record the electrocution...
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The Press
By general consensus the first attempt to start a regularly published newspaper in America was Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick, issued in Boston on September 25, 1690. Its founder was a transplanted British printer, Benjamin Harris,...
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The Press and the Presidents
Remember Adm. Bobby Ray Inman? He was the Clinton Secretary of Defense-designate with a short fuse and an even shorter career as a nominee. Named last December, this ex-Pentagon insider with good press contacts was on the fast track to certain confirmation...
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The Sewing Table
The sewing or "lady's work" table on the opposite page is a splendid example of one of the most elegant and functional forms of furniture to be introduced in America during the Federal period. Small, delicate, and portable, it was designed to provide...
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To Fix the Press
During a board meeting at Encyclopaedia Britannica in 1942, Henry Luce, editor in chief of Time Inc., passed a note to the educator Robert M. Hutchins. "How," Luce asked, "do I find out about the freedom of the press and what my obligations are?" Hutchins...
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Truman Scholar
From the time I was a young boy, one of my heroes was President Harry S. Truman. To me, the former haberdasher and county judge epitomized the model public servant. Truman even had a physical impact on me. When I was in elementary school I read...
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