American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 59, No. 1, Spring

Abolitionist John Doy: Tempers Flare and Violence Reigns in the Pre-Civil War Battleground of Kansas
On January 25, 1859, a small wagon expedition of three whites and 13 blacks stole away from Lawrence, Kansas, on the first leg of a journey that would take the African Americans to the free state of Iowa, far from Kansas and the ever-present threat...
A Capitol Attraction
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] WASHINGTON'S newest attraction proves that progress can come to the capital city. Last December, just in time for President Obama's inauguration, Congressional leaders proudly dedicated the new Capitol Visitor Center with...
A View from the Shore: New York Indians Discover Dutchmen
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] WHENEVER INDIANS and Europeans met, the process of discovery was usually reciprocal. In hindsight, these first encounters were asymmetrically momentous events, presaging catastrophic consequences for the native peoples of...
Champlain among the Mohawk, 1609: A Soldier-Humanist Fights a War for Peace in North America
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A FEW GENERATIONS AGO, American colonial history centered on a single narrative that flowed from Jamestown in 1607 to the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Today early American history has blossomed into a braided narrative...
Editor's Letter
THE KEEN 19TH-CENTURY OBSERVER OF THE AMERICAN SCENE, Alexis de Tocqueville, wrote "History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies." In this issue we celebrate some of this country's and North America's most remarkable...
First Encounters: The Journeys 400 Years Ago of a French and Dutch Explorer Would Forever Alter the History of North America
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] FOUR HUNDRED years ago, at most exactly the same historical moment., two intrepid European explorers came near meeting in the wilderness of today's New York State. Each left his name on the waters he visited, but the impact...
Flight of the WASP: The Women Airforce Service Pilots Seemed Strange and Exotic to World War II America. in Fact, Not Even the Military Could Quite Figure out What to Do with Them
CURIOSITY; PATRIOTISM, and even a hint of scandal lured the residents of Sweetwater, Texas, to the outskirts of town one April morning in 1943. The townspeople made a day of it, setting out picnic lunches near the military training base at Avenger...
Ford's Theater: Renovations Completed in Time for Lincoln Bicentennial
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] THE DAY AFTER LINCOLN'S assassination in 1865, while the actor-turned-murderer John Wilkes Booth fled into the Maryland countryside and the nation recoiled in outrage and shock, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton commissioned...
Guide to Historic Sites of the Hudson River & Champlain Region
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] NEW YORK'S HUDSON RIVER AND LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION In celebration of the 400th anniversary of Samuel de Champlain's and Henry Hudson's exploration of New York--and their encounters with Lenape and Iroquoian peoples--the...
Historical Record
WHAT SOUNDTRACK COMES to mind when you think of Andrew Jackson? If you're curious about an accompanying score for the seventh president, a recent CD release, The Atrocious Saint, will set your ears buzzing. The brainchild of world music performer...
King, Obama, and the Great American Dialogue: What Would Martin Luther King Jr.-Had He Been Alive Today-Thought of Our Latest President's Oratory?
STANDING IN THE COLD with 2 million others near the Capitol as Barack Obama delivered his inaugural address, I couldn't help but recall another crowded day 45 years earlier, when I heard Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" oration at the other...
Matters of Debate
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] IN THIS BICENTENNIAL YEAR of Lincoln's birth, one of the hundreds of offerings about the 16th president brings his voice to life with particular power: BBC Audiobooks has released a 16-hour audio recording of the famous debates...
Six of the Top Recent Books on Abraham Lincoln
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Abraham Lincoln is the most written-about person in American history, and the third most in world history--ranking below only Jesus and Napoleon. The deluge of books about the Great Emancipator has only increased with the...
Strangers in a New Land: Henry Hudson's First American Adventure
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ON SEPTEMBER 3, 1609, Henry Hudson and the English and Dutch men on the 80-ton Halve Maen (Half moon) came within sight of the coastline where New York meets New Jersey today. The view of the sandy white beach backed by forest...
Wall Streets 10 Most Notorious Rogues: The Country's Financial Hub Has a Long History of Lying, Cheating, and Stealing
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] NO ONE LIKES RECESSIONS, but no one dislikes them more than the crooks who are an inevitable part of any financial market. As the economy goes south, companies seeking to cut costs scrutinize their books more carefully and...