American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 5, Fall

Benedict Arnold: March on Quebec
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 18th century Dorchester Heights, Boston September 3, 1775 On that dusty gray Sunday morning, Benedict Arnold, newly commissioned Colonel in the Continental Army, accompanied his Commander in Chief, George Washington,...
Cabeza De Vaca: A Desperate Trek across America
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 16th century Florida panhandle, Fall 1528 The 250 starving Spanish adventurers dubbed the shallow estuary near their campsite the "Bay of Horses," because every third day they killed yet another draft animal, roasted...
Chief Joseph: The Nez Perce Flight for Justice
19th century Snake River, Oregon side, June 1877 The charismatic Indian leader Chief Joseph stood on the bank of the Snake River, looking across the water to Idaho and beyond to his people's new home, the Nez Perce reservation in the Clearwater...
Dark Day of 1780
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] At dawn on Friday, May 19, 1780 farmers in New England stopped to marvel at the ominous pink hue of the sun. By noon the sky had darkened to midnight blackness, causing Americans, still in the throes of a protracted war of...
Did Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson Love Each Other? A Historian Tackles One of American History's Thorniest Questions
In the nearly 11 years since the publication of my book Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy, I have traveled throughout the United States and overseas talking about them--and life and slavery at Monticello. Writers are, in the...
Eddie Rickenbacker: Lost at Sea for 24 Days
20th century Adrift on the Southern Pacific Ocean, day six, October 1942. Fifty-two-year-old Eddie Rickenbacker, America's top World War I ace and the dapper president of Eastern Air Lines, looked with deep concern over his seven companions in...
Editor's Letter
If you happen to meet someone who thinks history is boring or irrelevant, hand them this American Heritage to help them see the error of their ways. This issue packs a punch, with some of the most harrowing stories in American history and thought-provoking...
First Images of the New Word: "Lost Colony" Governor John White's Early Paintings Colored European Views for Centuries
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] In late 16th-century London, a group of curious Elizabethan courtiers gathered around a sheaf of watercolors and murmured in wonder. A cheife Herowans wife of Pomeoc and her daughter of the age of 8 or 10 yeares exhibited...
Florida's Surprising Past: Our 50 Picks of the Sunshine State's Top History Sites
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Great swathes of white sandy beaches and citrus groves, along with the glitter of Disney and Miami, have often diverted the spotlight from Florida s rich heritage: a history older than any other state's, chockfull of historic...
Fred W. Haise Jr.: Disaster at a Distant Moon
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 20th century Deep Space, April 13, 1970 I felt the wall of the tunnel shiver," recalls astronaut Fred Haise about the opening moments of a disaster that nearly marooned his Apollo 13 crew in deep space forever. At 9:08...
Gonzo Gonzo Gone
FOR THE COUNTER-CULTURE crowd of the late 1960s and early 1970s, reading Hunter S. Thompson was de rigueur. His best-known books, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream (1972) and Fear and Loathing: On the...
Jamestown Colony Shipwrecks
THE FIRST "PERMANENT" settlement in English North America could hardly have been a worse squeaker. The tragic saga that began in 1607 is now well known, given the tercentennial celebrations last year and the worthy effort to set the record straight...
Mary Rowlandson: Taken by Indians
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 17th century Lancaster, Massachusetts Bay Colony, February 10, 1676 A sunrise on this cold winter's day, 39-year-old Mary Rowlandson awoke to the sound of musket fire rippling across her remote town in north central...
Patience Loader: The Awful March of the Saints
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 19th century Florence, near present-day Omaha, August 1856 For 28-year-old Patience Loader, the journey so far had been chiefly exhausting. During the four weeks from July 25 to August 22, 1856, the company with which...
Patriots or Terrorists? the Lost Story of Revolutionary War POW's
SOMETIME THAT SEISMIC spring of 1776, 16-year-old Levi Hanford of Norwalk, Connecticut, enrolled in his uncle's militia company and went to war against the British. He expected to make short work of the enemy. Everybody knew how simple farm boys like...
She Kept the Nest
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] AUTHOR KATE CLIFFORD LARSON does not have any axes to grind in The Assassin's Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln (Basic Books, 288 pages, $26), the story of the first woman hanged by the U.S. government....
Treasure Trove of Capa Negatives Discovered
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Photographer Robert Capa fled Paris in 1939 at the outbreak of World War II, abandoning three cardboard cases containing some 3,500 photographic negatives taken during the Spanish Civil War. Capa, whom a British magazine once...
Wallace Turnage: A Slave's Audacious Bid for Freedom
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 19th century Mobile, Alabama, August 1864 One hot summer day in war-time Mobile, a city garrisoned by 10,000 Confederate troops, 17-year-old Wallace Turnage was driving his owner's carriage along Dauphin Street in the...