American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 3, May-June

Beyond Baseball; Cooperstown, New York, Is Famous for Its Fiction - the Last of the Mohicans, the Deerslayer, and the Abner Doubleday Myth
The name of this column is "History Happened Here," but in the case of Cooperstown, "History Didn't Happen Here" might be better. This is not to say that Cooperstown has no history; in fact, it has enough for half a dozen villages its size. But the...
Chaplain Kidder's Son
The Reverend Maurice Kidder used to wake at five to write sermons in his dark study where the beagle slept; that early hour seemed to give him the clarity to compose his lectures, which he delivered in an unaffected but commanding baritone voice each...
D-Day: What It Cost
This is a story of the months prior to June 6, 1944, and a few of the days following, told through some of the letters my twenty-three-yearold father, Frank Elliott, wrote my mother, Pauline, while he was with Company A of the 741st Tank Battalion,...
D-Day: What It Meant
By Charles Cawthon- A conjecture, worthy of a certainty, is that no American soldier on Omaha Beach at high noon, June 6, 1944, gave thought to being present at a turning point in world history. Any abstract thinking he may have done was more likely...
In This Issue
* It's been thirty-five years since the appearance of Cornelius Ryan's classic account of the D-day invasion, The Longest Day (Touchstone, 338 pages, $11.00 soft cover, CODE: SAS-7), which is still among the best. This year's fiftieth anniversary of...
Ragtime Diplomacy; Haiti's Current Plight Is Grimly Familiar to Anyone with the Least Knowledge of That Country's Past
Haiti is the difficult subject of this month's discourse. As I write, the United States is attempting to reach a peaceful, noninterventionary solution to the problem created when the president elected by popular vote three years ago, Rev. Jean-Bertrand...
The Man of the Century
AFTER HALF A CENTURY 1T IS HARD TO APPROACH FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT EXCEPT through a minefield of cliches. Theories of FDR, running the gamut from artlessness to mystification, have long paraded before our eyes. There is his famous response to the newspaperman...
The Passion of Typhoid Mary; Mary Mallon Could Do One Thing Very Well, and All She Wanted Was to Be Left to It
BY JOHN STEELE GORDON * Longfellow notwithstanding, precious few of us leave footprints in the sands of time. Even today, while our names will probably remain, buried in such things as old phone books and Social Security records, most of us will be...
The Perils of Success; Sewell Avery Was a Careful Student of Business History - but He Learned the Wrong Lesson
In 1984 IBM had the greatest after-tax profit of any company in the history of the world: $6.58 billion. Eight years later it had the greatest corporate loss in history up to that time: $5 billion. How could so profound a reversal of fortune happen...
When Dismal Swamps Became Priceless Wetlands
ORGANIZED AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM IS HARDLY older than this century, and most of its current concerns are younger still. Some of the resources it now tries to protect, in fact, were among its original targets. To the conservation movement of the...
Whispering Sammy; 'Tilden or Blood,' Cried the Newspapers, but the Man Himself Wouldn't Lift a Hand for the Presidency
Sushi and sashimi are being brought out in Shuji's Restaurant in New Lebanon, New York, around twenty-five miles from Albany, with the sliced ginger and that boiling-hot green pastelike stuff you mash into the soy sauce. We are in the stone and wood...