American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 7, October

Back to the Barricades
For the first time in a generation, student activism is on the rise. Do these new protesters have anything like the zeal, the conviction, and the clout of their famous 1960s predecessors? SOME 30 YEARS SINCE THE STORIED generation of Vietnam-era...
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Buying into the Nation's Attic
A CONTROVERSIAL DONATION RAISES QUESTIONS AT THE SMITHSONIAN THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION'S DECISION TO ESTABLISH a Hall of Fame of American Achievers at its Museum of American History, to be paid for with $38 million from a financial-services entrepreneur,...
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Dr. Townsend's Crusade
THE CRACKPOT IDEA THAT LED TO SOCIAL SECURITY HEAVEN KNOWS, THE PHYSICAL sciences have given birth to a rich assortment of follies since the beginnings of the scientific revolution in the seventeenth century, from perpetual motion machines down...
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Halloween
From its birth in pagan transactions with the dead to the current marketing push to make it a "seasonal experience," America's fastest-growing holiday has a history far older (and far stranger) than does Christmas itself IN 1517 MARTIN LUTHER TOOK...
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Hampton Roads
It is a place of noble harbors, a convergence of strong rivers and a promontory commanding a wind-raked bay; a shoreline enfolding towns older than the Republic and the most modern and formidable naval base on earth; a spot where a four-hour standoff...
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Screening: O.K. Anniversary
THE HIGHLY FICTIONALIZED BESTSELLER Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshall, by Stuart Lake, a former press secretary to Theodore Roosevelt, begun with Wyatt's cooperation and published in 1931, changed the Hollywood Western forever by centering it on a legendary...
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The 10 Greatest College Football Upsets
As chosen by our panel of experts in time for the fall season, here are the 10 greatest upsets in the history of major college football. 1 Notre Dame 35, Army 13 (1913). The little-known Fighting Irish, lightly regarded by the Eastern football establishment,...
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The Buyable Past: Railroad China
THE FIRST RAILROAD PASSENGERS boarded an American train in 1830. They'd better not have been hungry. Dinner wasn't served until 1868, when George Pullman designed a sumptuous dining car for the Chicago & Alton. Pullman's "Delmonico" and the...
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Time Machine October
100 YEARS AGO ON OCTOBER 16, Booker T. Washington, the nation's foremost black leader, dined at the White House with President Theodore Roosevelt and his family. When word of the meal got out, Southern whites reacted with fury. The Memphis Scimitar...
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Unforgiven
HOW'S THIS FOR A STORY? North Vietnam, 1972: Jane Fonda is in the midst of her visit when an N.V.A. officer gets an idea. He collects a group of American POWs from their septic dungeons, cleans them up, and has them mustered on parade to show his guest...
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What History Means to Me
Two years ago American Heritage inaugurated an annual contest, established in partnership with the textbook publisher Prentice Hall, in which students wrote essays on the theme WHAT HISTORY MEANS TO ME. This year, more than 5,000 essays came in...
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