American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 1, Spring

A Guide to Historical Sites along the Pony Express Trail: Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the First Ride of the Express
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] (1) Wells Fargo History Museum in Old Sacramento [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The 1853 B. F. Hastings Building, one of the most historic structures in the state, once held the westernmost terminus of the nearly 2,000-mile-long...
Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Pony Express
The National Pony Express Association (NPEA), which annually organizes a re-ride for the entire 1,966-mile mute, has big plans for the 150th anniversary this summer. The re-ride usually crosses the country as the original riders did, finishing the...
Colorado: America's Heart of Gold
Sharp snow-covered peaks, wide grassy plains, deep canyons, and cool mountain streams define the spectacular landscape of the Centennial State, which has enjoyed a rich history beginning with the Ute Indians who hunted the area's vast bison herds centuries...
Don't Know Much about History?
Find out how you stack up in a quiz given by the American Revolution Center (Hint: most of those who took it failed) You'll find the answers below, along with the percentage of Americans who answered each correctly. Good luck! 1. Who wrote the...
Franklin Charms Paris: The 70-Year-Old Statesman Lived the High Life in Paris and Pulled off a Diplomatic Miracle
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] BY THE TIME John Adams arrived in Paris in early 1778 to replace American diplomat Silas Deane, there was only one American name on everyone's lips: Ambassador Benjamin Franklin. "His name was familiar to government and people,"...
Lincoln Snatches the Nomination: Bare-Knuckles Politicking and a Brilliant Campaign Strategy Enabled the Dark Horse to Win
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] TEN THOUSAND DELEGATES, reporters, and spectators poured into Chicago from 24 different states and territories the second week of May 1860--all fully believing, as one put it, that their choice "would be the next President...
Roanoke's Lost Colony Found? New Ideas-And Archaeological Evidence-May Provide Answers to Colonial North America's Longest-Running Mystery
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ONE HOT AUGUST day in 1590, the heavily armed privateer Hopewell dropped anchor off the Outer Banks of North Carolina. John White had returned to resupply the 118 men, women, and children whom he had left on Roanoke Island...
Sit-In at the Woolworth's: A New Greensboro Museum Celebrates the Courage of Four Young Black Men 50 Years Ago
WINTER WEATHER canceled the sold-out gala banquet to celebrate the opening of the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, North Carolina, on Saturday, January 30. But come Monday morning, glad throngs braved the cold to commemorate...
Sizzling Satchel Paige: The Pitcher with the Unhittable Fireball Deserves as Much Credit for Breaking Baseball's Color Barrier as Jackie Robinson
April 1926 [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] LEROY "SATCHEL" PAIGE, arguably the greatest pitcher ever to throw a baseball, was as green as a big league infield that April day in 1926 when he joined his first professional team, the all-black Chattanooga...
The Pony Rides Again (and Again): Although It Ran Only Briefly 150 Years Ago, the Pony Express Still Defines Our Understanding of the Old West
SHORTLY BEFORE LAST Christmas, a prominent New York auction house put up for bid a collection of 63 postmarked envelopes and stamps that the daring riders of the Pony Express had carried 150 years ago. Experts estimated that the rare collection, Owned...
The Portable Past: Hist-Ineers, Terra-Tives and Mobi-Sodes: Get Ready for the Brave New Worm of History on the Really Small Screen
Can serious history be presented on a cell phone? Handheld devices such as BlackBerrys, iPhones, and other smart phones (and even some not-so-smart) can play video, access the Internet, and display Google maps nearly as well as larger computers. Add...
The Wild West and Remembering Robert H. Smith
This issue we ride back to the Old West and encounter the Battle of Little Bighorn and re-live the Pony Express, two of the most mythic and fascinating subjects to shape our view of the American past. One of our favorite writers, Nat Philbrick, the...
Twain's Game: The Great American Wit, Who Died 100 Years Ago, Patented a History Board Game
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "MANY PUBLIC-SCHOOL children seem to know only two dates--1492 and 4th of July; and as a rule they don't know what happened on either occasion," lamented American writer and wit Samuel L. Clemens (alias Mark Twain), whose...
Undying Fame: Fate Brought Custer and Sitting Bull Together One Bloody June Evening at the Little Bighorn-And Marked the End of the Wild West
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] News of the fierce battle between forces commanded by Sioux Chief Sitting Bull and Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer of the U.S. 7th Cavalry on the obscure grassy plains of the Montana Territory, above, reached the East just...