American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 4, Winter

A Boy from Tampico: Most Associate Ronald Reagan with California, but He Spent His Formative Years in the Midwest. on the Centennial of His Birth, a Handful of Small Illinois Towns Want a Share of the Limelight
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] BACK IN 1965 RONALD REAGAN published his first memoir, Where's the Rest of Me?, borrowing the title from a line in the 1942 Warner Brothers film Kings Row. In the movie--Reagan's favorite of all he starred in--he played Drake...
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America's First Generation ... in Photographs: These Are the Faces and Stories of the Men and Women Who Lived during the Revolutionary War and Survived into the Age of Photography
AT A GENEALOGICAL, conference in 2002, a man showed me a photograph and said, "This is Jonathan Leonard, my Revolutionary War ancestor." Staring into Leonard's piercing eyes, I gasped. Although more than 170 years old, this photograph looked as though...
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Editor's Letter
We are honored to publish here the recollections of front-line combat in the Pacific theater by James MacGregor Burns, one of America s most accomplished living historians. Readers of this magazine will be familiar with Burns, who has appeared many...
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Fremont Steals California; a Junior Army Officer, Acting on Secret Orders from the President, Bluffed a Far Stronger Mexican Force into Conceding North America's Westernmost Province to the United States
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] IN JUNE 1842, ARMY topographer Lt. John Charles Fremont and 22 men left Chouteau's Trading Post near present-day Kansas City to survey a wagon trail that would lead through the northern Rockies to...
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National Jewish Museum
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] IN THE SHADOW OF Independence Hall and a half block from the Liberty Bell, on some of this nation's most hallowed ground, sits the brand new glass-and-terra-cotta National Museum of American Jewish History, which opened this...
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Picturing Alaska: On a 1947 Trip Up North with His Son, Ansel Adams Took a Remarkable Photograph That Brought Alaska's Grandeur to the American Public on a Large Scale for the First Time
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] IN THE SUMMER of 1947, Ansel Adams and his 14-year-old son, Michael, undertook a six-week journey through Alaska that would have notable consequences for the history of conservation. Adams was already...
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The First to Secede: South Carolina Severed Ties with the Union Not out of Concern for States' Rights but Because of Slavery
AT 7 P.M. ON THURSDAY, December 20, 1860, some 170 men marched through the streets of Charleston, South Carolina, walking from St. Andrews Hall to a new meetinghouse amid the cheers of onlookers. Half of them were more than 50 years old, most well-known....
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The Naked Truth of Battle: A Preeminent Author Reports on His Experiences as One of America's First Combat Historians, among a Handful of Men Who Accompanied Soldiers into the Bloodiest Battles to Write History as It Was Being Made
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Early in July 1944, I joined American forces on the tiny island of Saipan in their latest onslaught, an operation resembling so many others as we cleared one Pacific island after another, each grim step moving us closer to...
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Those Magnificent Men: A Century Ago, a Skilled and Fearless Stunt Pilot Landed a Wire-and-Wood Aircraft on a Ship's Deck-And Introduced the Era of Naval Aviation
ON NOVEMBER 14, 1910, a professional "aviationist" named Eugene Ely stood by his plane on a temporary platform built over the foredeck of the USS Birmingham, a scout cruiser moored at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. On this rainy day, the 24-year-old pilot...
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