American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 2, April-May

1902: "When You Call Me That, Smile!" (Time Machine April/May)
100 YEARS AGO IN APRIL OF 1902 Owen Wister's Western novel The Virginian: A Horseman of the Plains was published. It was an immediate hit, selling 50,000 copies within four months and 100,000 within a year. It remained in print for decades. Wister,...
Beatball: Jack Kerouac's Make-Believe Baseball Game Has Been Archived for Posterity. (History Now)
The New York Public Library recently acquired a copious archive left by the novelist Jack Kerouac, including, according to an announcement, "two sets of more than one hundred handwritten cards that allowed Kerouac to play a fantasy baseball game of...
Enron & Henry Ford: Why the Boss Must Have a Boss. (the Business of America)
JUST AS EVERY cloud has a silver lining, so disasters always have a redeeming feature. Because of the Titanic, no major ship has struck an iceberg since. That most famous of disasters produced a slew of reforms, all of which made the sea a much safer...
Founding Filcher: Benjamin Franklin, Plagiarist? (History Now)
THE PRESS HAS RECENTLY SHOWN AN UNUSUAL INTEReSt in historiography. During a long, stern inquiry, it has followed accusations of plagiarism against prominent contemporary historians and often compared fragments of their works with those of their predecessors....
From West Point to Saratoga, New York Contains Poignant Reminders of the War of Independence. (A Revolutionary Outlook)
In the battle for American independence, no colony figured more mightily in General George Washington's strategy than New York If the British won control of the Hudson River, he rightly believed, they would literally be able to cut America in half....
Gettysburg's New Look: Plans Are Shown for an Improved Visitor Center. (History Now)
WHILE MANY CIVIL WAR BATTLEFIELDS have been losing out to encroaching development, Gettysburg has lately been turning the tide in that war. The victory scored in 2000, when the privately owned Gettysburg National Tower came down, was followed this...
Hood Ornaments. (History Now)
For almost half a century now, people have been complaining about the visual homogenization of American automobiles, and it's true that in the 1920s the various makes of cars were far more distinctive, right down to the hood ornament, that bit of sculpture...
Maryland: Oh, Say What Can One See? (Special Advertising Section)
This year, wayfarers with a hankering to connect with America's roots will find few better places to steer the wheel than the state of Maryland. "America in Miniature," a reporter for National Geographic aptly dubbed the state back in the 1920s. Here,...
Sailing On: Architectural Relics from Great Old Liners Find a Home in the Dining Rooms of Four New Ships
THE LATE 1990S SAW THE START OF AN IMMENSE BUILDing boom in cruise ships. Nineteen new ones arrived in 2001, and nearly 40 more are planned for the next two years. Most of these are enormous vessels, capable of accommodating more than 2,000 passengers....
The Big Island on Foot: The Hawaii of Centuries Long Past Emerges from the Landscapes Crossed by Its Ancient Trails
THE PAST PRESSES CLOSE TO THE SURFACE ON THE island of Hawaii, the southernmost in the archipelago, the one they call the Big Island. In 1985, during the first of what would be many trips to this massive volcanic isle, I toured its wild northern coast...
"The City at the Nation's Front Door": Hoboken's Hardworking History Exudes an Undeniable Gritty Charm-And Its View of Manhattan Is Incomparable
ON SEPTEMBER 26, 1918, THE MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENsive began. The attack on the German lines in France lasted for 47 days, until the war's end, and remains the longest battle in American history. During the assault, Gen. John J. Pershing, commander of...
The Great Dismal Swamp: George Washington Tried to Drain It. Harriet Beecher Stowe Was Inspired by the Escaped Slaves Hiding in It. Loggers Worked It for Centuries. Yet It Remains One of the Least-Known Unspoiled Spots in the East
VAST AND ANCIENT, SPRAWLING ACROSS THE BORDERS of Virginia and North Carolina, the Great Dismal Swamp is one of the largest natural areas on the East Coast, encompassing some 170 square miles. It is part of a series of federally protected wetlands...
The Guardians of Gullah: A Festival, a Culture, a Gift Too Great to Lose. (Culture/heritage)
Approaching the riverfront of Beaufort, SC, to witness the Gullah Festival, you're first met by the aroma of tantalizing food, carried on a soft breeze. You hear the sound of music. The Yoruba Drummers and Dancers are on stage. Your feet quicken to...
The New Time Travel: High Technology Welcomes Us into the Past. (Behind the Cutting Edge)
NEW TECHNOLOGIES DON'T ALways lead inexorably toward the future. Lately they've also been opening doors through which we can step straight into the past. One such door has let us experience a part of the childhood of our parents; another has led to...
Treasure Ship: How a Group of Prospectors, Digging for a Strike, Turned Up the Whole Mid-Nineteenth Century
THERE WAS NO WARNING OF IMPENDING DANGER AS THE Arabia, carrying 200 tons of freight from St. Louis, headed up the Missouri bound for Sioux City, Iowa. Many of the passengers were at dinner in the well-appointed dining room as the steamboat turned...
War and Our Freedoms: The Trouble with Military Tribunals. (in the News)
SECRET MILITARY tribunals, from which there is no appeal, imbued with the power to order secret executions of noncitizens. Suspension of habeas corpus for suspected terrorists. The abrogation of attorney-client confidentiality. War has often brought...
West Virginia: History and Wonders to Explore: West Virginia Unfolds for the Traveler like a Vast Treasure Map, with Spectacular Scenery and Spellbinding Stories along Every Trail and a Variety of Riches at Every Destination. (Special Advertising Section)
West Virginia's river cities are full of wonders, and its north central Mountaineer region abounds with living history. The Metro Valley is a cradle of culture and government and famous firsts. Southern West Virginia features fascinating glimpses of...
Where We Came from. (Letter from the Editors)
THIS IS OUR SIXTEENTH ANNUAL TRAVEL issue. When we started, in 1987, we were motivated partly by knowing that no other magazine was doing this; tying an American passion for travel to an equally intense interest in the nation's history. Years later...
Wyoming: A New Crop of Major Historical Attractions. (A Special Advertising Section)
Yellowstone National Park was officially proclaimed the world's first national park 130 years ago. Congress established its original boundaries entirely within the northwest corner of Wyoming Territory based on information gleaned from government surveys...