American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 4, August-September

1780: Benedict's Betrayal
225 YEARS AGO ON SEPTEMBER 23, three Continental guerrillas stopped a mounted man riding south near Dobbs Ferry, New York. He gave his name as John Anderson, and he seemed nervous and confused, so the men searched him. Hidden in his shoes they found...
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Agriculture in America
Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), Forbes, and American Heritage magazine recognize the importance of preparing our nation's youth for their roles as tomorrow's leaders. This year, we proudly announced an exciting opportunity for current high school...
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Brooklyn Rising: The City of Churches and Henry Ward Beecher, of Walt Whitman, Coney Island, and a Famously Departed Baseball Team Is Ready for Its Next Act-As a World-Class Tourist Destination
EVEN IF THEY'VE NEVER SET FOOT ON THIS area of 81 square miles at the southwestern tip of Long Island, most people have a vivid picture of Brooklyn--gained from gangster movies or postcards of its bridges or of Coney Island, songs ("Give Me the Moon...
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Dashiell Hammett
SO FAR IT'S BEEN A GOOD CENTURY FOR Dashiell Hammett. Last year saw the seventy-fifth anniversary of the publication of his first novel, Red Harvest, and this year is the seventy-fifth anniversary of his most famous and best-selling book, The Maltese...
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How Agriculture Is Important to My Life and My Future
Looking back on my life, I have always known that I was different. I have always woken up earlier than all my friends; I had to get on the bus for school at seven o'clock when school didn't start for an hour and a half, and I had chores that none of...
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Jump in Your Car and Come as You Are: The Drive-In Is Thrivin' All across America
OR THOSE OF YOU WHO THINK THE DRIVE-IN MOVIE theater is a thing of the past, we have good news. There are still more than 400 drive-ins operating today (40 of them have been built or reopened in the last five years), and most are showing first-run...
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Long Live the Queens: The QM2, the Latest in a Line of Great Cunarders, Aims to Command the Seas
YEARS AGO I ACQUIRED a wonderful piece of memorabilia, an invitation to the September 26, 1934, launch of a ship known as No. 534, with Their Majesties King George V and Queen Mary in attendance. The vessel's name was a closely guarded secret until...
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My Brooklyn
NATHAN WARD SAYS IN HIS ESSAY ON Brooklyn in this issue that one in seven American families has its roots in that borough's soil. This sort of claim is a fact-checker's nightmare, but nobody can deny the powerful hold Brooklyn has on the national imagination....
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Saving the "IMAX of Its Day": The 120-Year-Old Blancos Variados Para Todas Las Ocasiones Gettysburg Cyclorama Is Again a Work in Progress
THE ADVERTISEMENTS IN THE ORIGINAL SOUVENIR PROGRAM ran the gamut from pianos and diamonds to accident-insurance, carriages, and a Seminole Indian potion to cure catarrh, eczema, and cancer. The common denominator: the opportunity to reach the vast...
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September 11: Looking Back and Forward: Are We Learning from the Past? and Are We Honoring It?
HOW DOES A GREAT REPUBLIC sustain itself? How do we keep the democratic ideal before us in a world preoccupied with instant gratification, with allegiance to tribe and creed above all else? A democracy must always face in three directions at once,...
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The 18-Hole Hustle: During the Golden Age of Golf, Many of the Sport's Greatest Players Never Went Pro. They Couldn't Afford the Pay Cut
It was a short putt, about three feet or so, and the stakes were only $5,000--pocket change for a guy like the poker champion John "Professor" Moss, even in 1939 dollars, not that Moss was prone to choking anyway. This was more about bragging rights,...
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The Lost Tribe of Indian: Recently a Company Tried to Harness History by Resurrecting a Great American Motorcycle. What Happened Is a Cautionary Tale about Business, and Memory, and the Seductive Urge to Recapture the Past
On November 1, 2003, I flew to Los Angeles to attend a support rally for the second incarnation of an American legend. Defunct since 1953, the fabled Indian Motorcycle Company was kick-started back to life in 1999. But four years later it found itself,...
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Time and Time Again
"IN 1976 MY DAUGHTERS AND I PUT TOGETHER A BICENTENNIAL BOX," WRITES JUDY IVERY, FROM St. Louis. "We asked family members to add to our collection, we sealed it up, and we vowed not to touch it until the year 2000. The years went by, and in February...
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Trading Up: The New York Stock Exchange Plans to Modernize by Merging with a New Competitor-Just as It Did in 1869
WALL STREET, THE WORLD'S greatest capital market, is inevitably a mirror to the global economy. What happens in the world is quickly reflected in Wall Street as market forces and new technology cause old industries to fade and new ones to rise. And...
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What Happened at Fort Pillow? Trying to Understand the Civil War's Ugliest Incident
Andrew Ward, a frequent contributor to these pages, has just completed River Run Red: The Fort Pillow Massacre in the American Civil War (Viking). The editors asked him why he had chosen to spend years studying this very grim subject. ON APRIL 12,...
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