American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 4, July-August

City Station
The country's largest railroad station as well as once one of the busiest will turn one hundred on September 4, and preceding the anniversary will come a summer's worth of celebrations. Theodore Link, the architect of the handsome towered structure,...
Duesenberg
Doozy. As in "It's a Duesy." As in Duesenberg. As in power and speed and audacious size and spellbinding beauty. As in engineering, breeding, and bloodline that place it at the very pinnacle of automotive achievement, beside such icons as Rolls-Royce,...
Echoes of a Distant War
Korea is in the news again, and it's ugly news. North Korea may or may not have the capability to make nuclear weapons, and North Korea's aging dictator, Kim I1 Sung, is unwilling to let international inspectors find out. The United Nations is talking...
First Step to the Moon
The shrill ringing woke me from deep sleep early in the morning of April 12, 1961. I was confused for a moment, but only a moment. I was in my room in the Holiday Inn at Cocoa Beach, Florida. I reached for the clamoring telephone. "What?" ...
How I Didn't Kill Hermann Goering (Confessions of a Theoretical Assassin)
My father, David Davidson, son, wrote about serving as a journalist attached to the U.S. Army in immediate postwar Germany, publishing a well-received novel, The Steeper Cliff in 1947 and a memoir in American Heritage (June 1982). That time in Germany...
Nuremberg, Time and Memory
A sensation of parallel time, of one eye fixed on the present and the other focused on the past, of one ear hearing the moment and the other distant echoes, was there from the beginning of the project. Nuremberg 1945, San Miguel de Allende 1991. The...
One Small Drive
Friday, July 11, 1969, found our family excitedly preparing for our annual vacation trip. I was in the back yard of our Cold Spring, Kentucky, house, with my two sons, thirteen-year-old Steven and eleven-year-old Mark. We were storing rods, reels,...
The Armor-Plate Scandal
Economists from Adam Smith on have written about the evils and dislocations that monopolies bring to an economy. What has been much less written about over the years, however, are the evils of monopsony. In the interest of saving wear and tear on...
The Girls of Summer
Frisbees sail about in the Circle now, tossed by students in their jeans and sneakers, or cutoffs and shorts with tank tops when Poughkeepsie's weather permits. it's true, kind of: The more things change, the more they remain the same. Here in the...
The Long Asphalt Trail
Traveling west on the Wyoming stretch of Interstate 80 (which extends from New York to San Francisco), I found that the headline of what might be the most floridly evocative ad ever written kept sounding in my mind. "Somewhere west of Laramie," starts...
The Warfare State
Alexis de Tocqueville observed in 1835 that America had no neighbors and hence no enemies. Indeed the New World Republic was the ultimate island power, with the Atlantic Ocean providing a protective moat nearly a hundred times as wide as the English...
The Water in Which You Swim
William,Ferris, fifty-two years old, is a prolific writer in folklore, American literature, fiction, and photography and is co-editor of the monumental Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. Since 1979 he has been the director of the Center for the Study...