Mosaic (Winnipeg)

Mosaic, subtitled A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, is a scholarly journal that covers interdisciplinary studies and literary criticism. Founded in October of 1967, Mosaic prints this journal quarterly. Mosaic covers the topic of literature. The Editor is Dr. Dawne McCance.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, March

Between Sublimity and Redemption: Toward a Theory of Holocaust Representation
The terms sublimity and redemption are controversial in the context of the Holocaust. This essay re-examines these terms in their relation to theology and Kantian aesthetics, and works from the terms to a theory of Holocaust representation. If thought...
Brautigan's Psychomachia
Critics have interpreted Brautigan as experimentalist, hippie/ beat, and neurotic. The author of this essay constructs him as narrative aesthetician, whose Zen-based strategies let him balance extreme emotional tensions with simple form and encourage...
Fluid Economies: Portraying Shakespeare's Hysterics
Rather than adopting the psychoanalytic construct of "hysteria," this essay examines how hysterical pathology is defined according to early modern medical and cultural contexts and how it is represented in Shakespeare's plays. Looking at nineteenth-century...
Gambling against the House: Anglo and Indian Perspectives on Gambling in American Literature
Arguing that the controversy over reservation gambling reflects unresolved tensions involving Indian relations and the social role of gambling in American culture, this essay analyzes gambling in two early-twentieth-century novels, Edith Wharton's...
Introduction
When, in the lead essay in this issue, Amy Pratt proposes to read the "textual incoherence" of a popular post-revolutionary American narrative "as a response to a cultural crisis about 'economies of selfhood,'" she marks out a point of departure made...
New Science, Old Myth: An Evolutionary Critique of the Oedipal Paradigm
Arguing that literary scholarship remains largely oblivious to important late-twentieth-century scientific advances in human cognition and behaviour, this essay reviews biological and anthropological evidence contradicting the oedipal model, and presents...
On the Return of (the Repressed): Rhetoric
Using a Freudian metaphor reinterpreted by Jacques Lacan, this essay argues that rhetoric is returning to the humanities. That return manifests itself in partial returns through topoi, truncated returns via the figure, fuller returns in feminist criticism,...
Southwell's "A Vale of Tears : A Psychoanalysis of Form
Putting psychoanalytic conceptions of self-transformation through speech in dialogue with early modern devotional techniques of spiritualizing the physical, this essay asks how Robert Southwell's poem "A Vale of Tears" constitutes a work of mourning....
The Logic of Expenditure in Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God has sometimes been criticized for its alleged failure to critique racism and sexism and for its emphasis on self-affirmation. This essay uses Georges Bataille's notion of expenditure to illuminate the...
The Pleasure of Being Lost: "The Panther Captivity" and the Metaphysics of Commerce
This essay examines, critically, the way a popular post-revolutionary captivity narrative, "The Panther Captivity," challenges a model of self influenced by economic ideas about self-regulating natural laws. Among the many revolutionary acts that...
The Realist Trickster as Legba: Howells's Capitalist Critique
This essay posits a trickster figure as the central element of William Dean Howells's critique of capitalism, in which the market system divides into aspects of unformed power, on the one hand, and applied competence, on the other. It argues that these...
Whose Story Is It, Anyway? an Interdisciplinary Approach to Postmodernism, Narrative, and Therapy
This essay examines the increasing influence of postmodern thinking in literary studies and psychology. It explores, both theoretically and through case studies from both fields, the increasing convergence between the two discourses. Postmodernism...