Mosaic (Winnipeg)

Mosaic, subtitled A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, is a scholarly journal that covers interdisciplinary studies and literary criticism. Founded in October of 1967, Mosaic prints this journal quarterly. Mosaic covers the topic of literature. The Editor is Dr. Dawne McCance.

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 1, March

Acousmatic Presences: From DJs to Talk-Radio Hosts in American Fiction, Cinema, and Drama
Radio's the greatest because it's all in here. It's a theatre of the mind. --Robert W. Smith, a.k.a. "The Wolfman" The disc jockey (also called "DJ" or "jock") is a figure that originated in the history of radio in the United States: the phrase "disc...
Friend/to Any/word: Steve Lacy Scores Tom Raworth
For forty years, Tom Raworth's poetry has refused to be still, attending to the loose networks of language, signal, and sign that shape his and our media-saturated lives. This kinesis derives from his commitment to textual performance, to sounding...
Introduction
Has anyone written a book on philosophy's bees? It was Jacques Derrida who, on several occasions, called attention to the long tradition "on the philosophical topos of the bee" that prevails in the West, from Aristotle through Schelling, Marx, Heidegger,...
Kant and the Sublime Murmur of the We
Jean-Luc Nancy begins his recent book A l' ecoute with a question about the nature of philosophy--a question that is potentially vexing, even dangerous, for philosophy, insofar as it concerns, in Nancy's words, the limits of philosophy. The question...
"Oui, Let's Scat": Listening to Multi-Vocality in George Elliott Clarke's Jazz Opera Quebecite
Listening, as a critical practice, fundamentally alters the interaction between audience and text from passive to participatory, but the question remains as to what enables this listening to be political. In George Elliott Clarke's jazz opera Quebecite,...
Past Performance, Present Dilemma: A Poetics of Archiving Sound
Designated as a site of accumulation, preservation, and order, the archive was traditionally characterized as stagnant and dead. Since the "archival turn" in the early 1990s, theorists and researchers across the disciplines have interrogated perceptions...
Soliloquies of Silence: James Turrell's Theatre of Installation
One of the most urgent tasks for contemporary thought is, without doubt, to redefine the concept of the transcendental in terms of its relation with language. For if it is true that Kant was able to articulate his concept of the transcendental only by...
Songs of Freedom: The Politics and Geopolitics of Modern Jazz
For twenty-five centuries, Western knowledge has tried to look upon the world. It has failed to understand that the world is not for the beholding. It is for hearing. It is not legible, but audible.--Jacques Attali, Noise: The Political Economy of Music ...
Sounding the Hyperlink: Skewed Remote Musical Performance and the Virtual Subject
This essay contributes to the decentring of vision that has been the project of much recent scholarship. Accepting derrida's argument in Of Grammatology that the sound of the voice is not a sounding of presence, this essay nonetheless argues that sound...
Sound Mind: Josephine Dickinson's Deaf Poetics
Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd. Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone. --John Keats It is quite natural. Some hear more pleasantly with the eyes...
The Morrison Songbook: Proliferation in Jazz
In Toni Morrison's Jazz, Harlem's streets are like the groove in a record--at once a scene of oppression and release: "What [the city] is is decisive, and if you pay attention to the street plans, all laid out, the City can't hurt you" (8). It is the...
The Sounds of the Audience
The sounds that audiences make, of laughing, booing, or cheers, can be heard in early-twentieth-century novels and periodicals. There is also the rustling of dresses and playbills, the shuffling of feet, coughing, and conversation. This era of changing...
The Talkie Cure: Psychoanalysis and the Art of Noise
In 1930 the great Hungarian film theorist Bela Balazs argued that the advent of the sound film marked the "discovery of noise": "The sounds of our day-to-day life we hitherto perceived merely as confused noise, as a formless mass of din, rather as...
When Silence Plays Vielle: The Metaperformance Scenes of le Roman De Silence in Performance
The thirteenth-century French Le Roman de Silence invites us to participate in a minstrel's perspective on silence. But it is only in performance that this perspective is embodied, and it is only in the discrepancies between what is explicitly stated...