National Forum

Covers a wide range of topics including those of education, business, international affairs, and multicultural issues in an effort to provide documentation for professional research and development.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 4, Fall

Cold War or "Cold Peace"? Forecasting the Future in the New World Order
Looking back, historians in the early twenty-first century are unlikely to have settled on any one explanation of how conflict among America, Japan, and Germany caused the new world order of the mid-to-late 1990s to become a nightmare. "Economic warfare"...
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Contemporary Terrorism: An Overview
Terrorism--the calculated unlawful utilization of physical force and psychological intimidation by substate or clandestine state agents directed against innocent targets, primarily intended to achieve social, economic, political, strategic, or other...
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Disorder in the New World Order? the Future of Terrorism
The collapse of the Communist world and the rush of liberal democracies and market-based economies to fill the void have ushered in extensive speculation about the shape of the world to come. Many have suggested that a new world order will take the place...
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From Discord to Accord: International Environmental Governance and the New World Order
With the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) now behind us, it is clear that environmental issues will be a central feature of international relations in the post-Cold War era. But will the challenge of sustainable development,...
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How New Will the Better World Be?
In October 1991, just two months after the failed August coup and ten weeks before the final collapse of the Soviet empire, I went to Moscow to witness and celebrate the death throes of the Communist world. Though forty years before in an article entitled...
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Human Rights in a Post-Cold War World
The idea of human rights is one of the most appealing contributions of Western civilization. Rooted in some aspects of Greco-Roman culture, developed by the Enlightenment philosophes, implemented on a grand scale following the American--and less securely...
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New Rules for Playing the Game
The late 1920s and early 1930s began with a series of worldwide financial crashes that ultimately spiraled downward to the Great Depression. As GNPs fell, the dominant countries each created trading blocs (the Japanese Co-Prosperity Sphere, the British...
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Putting People Back in Politics: The National Issues Forums
This election year has run the rhetorical gamut from whistle-stop bus tours to who used the word God most at conventions. Amidst the slings and arrows and Perotism emerged a relatively new phenomenon in post-Cold-War politics--citizens. The cry we heard,...
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Setting New Priorities
The next president must see issues of trade and industrial leadership as worthy of the same attention as arms negotiation, because if he/she cannot maintain America's economic might, he/she will eventually have no arms over which to negotiate. At the...
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The Global Corporation: Its Role in the New World Order
The end of World War II marked the beginning of the cooperative effort aimed at guaranteeing economic growth and prosperity around the globe. The Bretton Woods meeting in 1944 created an international monetary system that secured the liquidity needed...
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The New World Disorder: A Challenge for Nongovernmental Diplomacy
The end of the Cold War and a new world order have not brought much order to international politics. For forty years, the organizing principle of U.S. foreign policy has been rivalry with the former Soviet Union. The locus of this rivalry has been Europe:...
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The New World Order and the Public Trust
Despite President George Bush's public reference to a new world order, the administration has been unable to offer a coherent operational framework of the concept. In the early fall of 1992, American foreign policy remains trapped in the rhetoric of...
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The New World Order and the Pursuit of Democracy in Central Europe
When I first traveled to Poland in June 1973, I believed the world of communism to be a fairly stable alternative modern order. I knew it wasn't a good order, or in particularly good order, but I assumed its permanence. I was not unusual. Everyone then...
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The New World Order: Can We Afford It?
It is ironic that in the midst of the Persian Gulf crisis the President of the United States George Bush gave his New World Order speech to a Joint Session of the Congress (11 September 1990). For embedded in that speech is a world vision that has eluded...
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