D.H. Lawrence Review

Articles

Vol. 38, No. 1, Spring

Editor's Corner
This issue of the D. H. Lawrence Review is quite diverse. We start with two articles that examine Lawrence's work from the perspective of language. Michael Ross analyzes Lawrence's frequent use of foreign words and phrases in developing the themes...
Read preview Overview
Polyglot Perversity: Multilingualism in Lawrence's Brangwen Saga
A striking yet seldom discussed feature of D. H. Lawrence's style is his penchant for inserting non-English words and phrases into his texts. According to Michael Bell, "The question of language is obviously central to Lawrence in several respects"...
Read preview Overview
Community, Family, "Morel": A Dialect Approach to Sons and Lovers
Introduction: Lawrence and the Dialect of Eastwood What I am offering in this paper may be a slightly unusual--because specifically sociolinguistic--perspective on Sons and Lovers. I would argue that, on the evidence of this novel (and a number...
Read preview Overview
The White Peacock and "The School of Lorna Doone"
Ford Madox Ford's detailed account of his initial response to Lawrence's work sheds light on the particular difficulties involved in properly assessing a canonical author's early writings. This account was written after Lawrence's death, but it concerns...
Read preview Overview
D. H. Lawrence's Angelic Men
His face, lit up intensely like that, had something--it seemed so ridiculous--of the pure masculine angel about it. (FLC 99) The recurrence of angel figures throughout D. H. Lawrence's oeuvre has seldom been remarked, with critics preferring to...
Read preview Overview
Keith Sagar. "Art for Life's Sake": Essays on D. H. Lawrence
Keith Sagar. "Art for Life's Sake": Essays on D. H. Lawrence. Nottingham: Critical, Cultural and Communications Press, 2011. Pp. 248. 14.99 [pounds sterling] (paper). Peter Preston. Working with Lawrence: Texts, Places, Contexts. Nottingham: Critical,...
Read preview Overview
Rachel Gilmour and Bill Schwarz, Eds. End of Empire and the English Novel since 1945
Rachel Gilmour and Bill Schwarz, eds. End of Empire and the English Novel since 1945. Manchester and New York: Manchester UP, 2011. Pp. xii + 244. 60 [pounds sterling] (cloth). This collection of smartly argued essays adds up to more than the sum...
Read preview Overview
Looking over Lawrence's Shoulder: Lawrence in Australia and the Creation of Kangaroo
For Lawrence scholars--and anyone interested in literature, Kangaroo, Lawrence's eighth major novel, presents us with a unique opportunity to see in detail the way a work of art is created. As Richard Aldington so perceptively observed in his Introduction...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 37, No. 2, Fall

Editor's Corner
In this issue of the D. H. Lawrence Review, we encounter three quite different essays centering on three different genres of Lawrence's work. Gerald Doherty examines The Fox through the lens of species discourse, looking at ways in which the central...
Read preview Overview
D. H. Lawrence's the Fox: A Question of Species
Among its other distinguishing qualities, D. H. Lawrence's The Fox is remarkable for the range and intensity of the critical conflicts it has generated over the three generations since its publication (1922), and for the sheer contradictoriness of...
Read preview Overview
Responding to Non-Human Otherness: Poems by D.H. Lawrence and Katherine Mansfield
This essay examines varying epistemological positions of the human poetic "I" as it encounters nonhuman otherness, focusing specifically on an analysis of selected poems by D. H. Lawrence and Katherine Mansfield. Many critics over the years have used...
Read preview Overview
Studies in Classic American Literature and American Studies
Eighty years after its publication, Susan Sontag described D.H. Lawrence's Studies in Classic American Literature as "the most interesting book ever written about American culture" (n. pag). Sontag was speaking at the Frankfurt Book Fair, where she...
Read preview Overview
D. H. Lawrence. Selected Poems
D. H. Lawrence. Selected Poems. Ed. James Fenton. New York: Penguin, 2008. Pp. xxvi + 200. $16 (paper) In 2008 Penguin Books published Lawrence's Selected Poems, edited by James Fenton, as part of its Penguin Classics series. This volume replaced...
Read preview Overview
David James, Ed. the Legacies of Modernism: Historicising Postwar and Contemporary Fiction
David James, ed. The Legacies of Modernism: Historicising Postwar and Contemporary Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pp. xii + 288. $99 (cloth) According to the jacket blurb for this recent collection, "The book sets out new...
Read preview Overview
Jesse Wolfe. Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of Intimacy
Jesse Wolfe. Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of Intimacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. viii + 264. 4 b/w illustrations. 14 tables. $90 (cloth) The lens of intimacy enables Wolfe's thought-provoking and sometimes insightful...
Read preview Overview
From Old Germany to New Mexico: An Overview of Frieda Lawrence's Letters
Introduction Acknowledgements Editorial Principles A Checklist of the Complete Letters of Frieda Lawrence Introduction Frieda Lawrence (1879-1956), like many wives of famous men, proved herself a worthy mate for D. H. Lawrence. She rarely felt...
Read preview Overview
From Old Germany to New Mexico: An Overview of Frieda Lawrence's Letters
1924 324. To Anna von Richthofen, [9? January 1924]. From Hampstead. Text: MS UT; unpub. Opening: "Heute morgen Dein Brief." [Your letter this morning.] 325. To Willard Johnson (jointly with DHL), 1 February [1924]. From Paris. Text: MS Yale;...
Read preview Overview
From Old Germany to New Mexico: An Overview of Frieda Lawrence's Letters
1937 943. To The Editor, American Mercury, 9 January 1937. From Concord. Text: TSC Cornell; pub. American Mercury XL. 160 (April 1937), xxxi. Opening: "Only today I read the article in your "American Mercury" of June, 1936 by Ford Madox Ford on...
Read preview Overview
From Old Germany to New Mexico: An Overview of Frieda Lawrence's Letters
1950 1552. To Rebecca James (jointly with AR), 1 January 1950. From Port Isabel. Text: MS Yale; unpub. Opening: "It's seven o'clock." 1553. To Dorothy Brett, 3 January 1950. From Port Isabel. Text: MS Yale; unpub. Opening: "I hope you have got...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 37, No. 1, Spring

Editor's Corner
This issue of the D. H. Lawrence Review features five articles, each examining Lawrence's work from varying perspectives. The first two papers study Lawrence in relation to two very different writers, T. S. Eliot and Emile Zola. Carl Krockel explores...
Read preview Overview
Legacies of War: The Reputations of Lawrence and T.S. Eliot in the Modernist Period
In the first version of Studies in Classic American Fiction from between late 1917 and mid 1918, Lawrence made an anticipatory "post-war" statement that was only half-formulated yet extremely suggestive. Describing the frustration and anger of those...
Read preview Overview
Germinal, Germination, and the Rainbow
A reader of The Rainbow (1915) and Zola's Germinal, published in 1885 the year of Lawrence's birth, can hardly fail to be struck by parallels. Apart from coal-mining themes, both novels build toward visions of regeneration through motifs of germination....
Read preview Overview
"What's in a Name?": Naming Men in Lawrence's Novels
Annable and Cyril, Birkin and Gerald, Lilly and Aaron--the list of paired male characters in Lawrence's novels goes on and on. Some of us have sensed a pattern in which one central character is identified by his surname and the other by his given name....
Read preview Overview
The Search for Pan: Difference and Morality in D. H. Lawrence's "St Mawr" and "The Woman Who Rode Away"
From Sons and Lovers to Lady Chatterley's Lover, D. H. Lawrence's literary landscape holds a peculiar import that crystallizes and becomes most vivid when he writes about the American South-West, Taos holding a place in his fiction that is perhaps...
Read preview Overview
Alternative Discourse, "On Being Religious," and the Teaching of Writing
Prologue A student of Lawrence since my twenty-first year, when I read him for the first time, I am also a teacher of writing (academic as well as creative) and, increasingly, a teacher of university teachers of writing. These parts of my professional...
Read preview Overview
D. H. Lawrence. Quetzalcoatl
D. H. Lawrence. Quetzalcoatl. Ed. N. H. Reeve. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. xliv + 408. $130 (cloth). Quetzalcoatl, the draft of The Plumed Serpent that Lawrence wrote in Chapala in May-June 1923, is the last of a series of early...
Read preview Overview
Virginia Crosswhite Hyde and Earl G. Ingersoll, Eds. "Terra Incognita": D. H. Lawrence at the Frontiers
Virginia Crosswhite Hyde and Earl G. Ingersoll, eds. "Terra Incognita": D. H. Lawrence at the Frontiers. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2010. Pp. 220. $58.50 (cloth). Writing to John Middleton Murry from Del Monte Ranch in October...
Read preview Overview
Sydney Janet Kaplan. Circulating Genius: John Middleton Murry, Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence
Sydney Janet Kaplan. Circulating Genius: John Middleton Murry, Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010. Pp. x + 228. $105 (cloth) Faith Binckes. Modernism, Magazines, and the British Avant-Garde: Reading...
Read preview Overview
Galya Diment. A Russian Jew of Bloomsbury: The Life and Times of Samuel Koteliansky
Galya Diment. A Russian Jew of Bloomsbury: The Life and Times of Samuel Koteliansky. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2011. Pp. xii + 444. 50 b/w photographs. $59.95 (cloth). At last, what D. H. Lawrence scholars have long...
Read preview Overview
Axel Goodbody and Kate Rigby, Eds. Ecocritical Theory: New European Approaches
Axel Goodbody and Kate Rigby, eds. Ecocritical Theory: New European Approaches. Charlottesville and London: University of Virginia Press, 2011. Pp. x + 326. $35 (cloth). This is a timely and substantial volume. Readers already closely involved with...
Read preview Overview
Daniel Fuchs. the Limits of Ferocity: Sexual Aggression and Modern Literary Rebellion
Daniel Fuchs. The Limits of Ferocity: Sexual Aggression and Modern Literary Rebellion. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011. Pp. x + 406. $26.95 (paper). At a time in which the American political environment could hardly be more extreme or polarized,...
Read preview Overview
In Memoriam
Gary S. Adelman Gary Adelman, emeritus professor of English at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he taught for over forty years, died in February at 77. He was the author of two books on Lawrence: Snow of Fire (on The Rainbow and...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 36, No. 2, Autumn

Editor's Comments
Since the Twelfth International D. H. Lawrence Conference was held this year in Sydney, it is satisfying that we have in this issue two articles on Lawrence and Australia; one of these, by Paul Eggert, was the conference's Mark Spilka Lecture. Two...
Read preview Overview
D. H. Lawrence, Henry Lawson and Single-Author Criticism
The place, Sydney, and the year, 1922, mark a curious conjunction in the writing careers of D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930) and Henry Lawson (18671922). This conjunction points at a number of parallels, previously unremarked, but well worth drawing out....
Read preview Overview
Dreaming Better Dreams: D. H. Lawrence, the Wilkinsons, and William Morris
In the discussion of D. H. Lawrence and politics, a number of critical terms have an afterlife. Two examples of this are saying that Lawrence's constant political goal was a small community called "Rananim," and seeing Lawrence in the mid-1920s as...
Read preview Overview
"Falling out of a Picture": The Australian Landscape in D.H. Lawrence's Kangaroo
"[T]he mind and the terrain shape each other: every landscape is a landscape of desire to some degree, if not always for its inhabitants" Rebecca Solnit (Landscapes 9). Modernist writers, captivated by the work of mapping the complex terrain of...
Read preview Overview
D. H. Lawrence's Dis-Ease: Examining the Symptoms of "Illness as Metaphor"
One is ill because one doesn't live properly--can't. It's the failure to live that makes one ill. (WL 125). Medical anthropology and the history of science teach the many ways in which illness, healing, and the relationship of patient to specialist...
Read preview Overview
The "Something Else": Ethical Ecriture in D. H. Lawrence's St Mawr
During the last two decades or so, the ethical turn within literary studies is generally marked by reactions against an older moral criticism, rooted in assumptions about the stability and universality of values. This classical position tends to apprehend...
Read preview Overview
Peter Preston (1944-2011)
The world of Lawrence studies has lost one of its giants with the death this October of Peter Preston, a man who participated wholeheartedly in all Lawrence activities, whose warm personality enhanced the many conferences and workshops he attended,...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 36, No. 1, Spring-Summer

Lawrence's Kangaroo: De-Establishing the Double-Bind of Masculinity
Kangaroo is little more than an egregious failure (Daly xv) In the Introduction to the Penguin edition of Kangaroo, Macdonald Daly points out that the dominant trend of scholarship pertaining to D. H. Lawrence's novel has not only been overly critical...
Read preview Overview
Kangaroo: Lawrence's Homeless Hero in Search of a Place
The world is round, and brings the rolling stone home again. And I must go till I find something that brings me peace. D. H. Lawrence (1) In his letters to friends and agents while in Australia, Lawrence described Kangaroo as a "queer" and "funny...
Read preview Overview
"I Went to the Scientific Doctor": D. H. Lawrence, Medical Holism, and Modern Therapeutic Selfhood
I Sometime during the summer of 1929, a desperately ill D. H. Lawrence jotted down a short poem in the first of the two notebooks posthumously published by Richard Aldington and Guiseppe Orioli as Last Poems (1932): When I went to the scientific...
Read preview Overview
Violence and Laughter in Women in Love
D. H. Lawrence wrote the first version of Women in Love in 1916, the year of the battles of Verdun and the Somme. As much as he loathed the war, the text never refers to it directly, causing critics to disagree about the depth of his engagement in...
Read preview Overview
Inheritance from the Earth and Generational Passages in D.H. Lawrence's the Rainbow
In The Rainbow, Lawrence presents an agrarian familial alternative to industrialism, and demonstrates pastoral tensions with modernization. (1) In this respect, The Rainbow resonates with Michael Squires's The Pastoral Novel: Studies in George Eliot,...
Read preview Overview
Flowers and Flesh: Color, Place, and Animism in St Mawr and "Flowery Tuscany"
Lawrence was deeply interested in the dynamics of germination that link all organic species. In "Spirit of Place" (1918), he affirmed that soil and climate bring forth their own intrinsic flora and fauna, human beings and cultures: "some subtle magnetic...
Read preview Overview
San Gaudenzio Past and Present
Whenever I visit Gargnano on the western shore of Lake Garda, I undertake at least one walk up the Via Crocefisso, a narrow cobbled street built over a section of a prehistoric track that leads into the mountains behind the small town. (1) Before the...
Read preview Overview
Lawrence, D. H. Mornings in Mexico and Other Essays
Lawrence, D. H. Mornings in Mexico and Other Essays. Ed. Virginia Crosswhite Hyde. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. Pp. lxxii + 370. $125 (cloth). Mornings in Mexico and Other Essays, superbly edited by Virginia Crosswhite Hyde, brings together all...
Read preview Overview
Bethan Jones. the Last Poems of DH. Lawrence: Shaping a Late Style
Bethan Jones. The Last Poems of DH. Lawrence: Shaping a Late Style. Farnham, UK, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2010. Pp. xiv + 234. $99.95 (cloth). (Also available as e-book). This welcome book is one I plan to reread. There has not been much extended...
Read preview Overview
Jane Jaffe Young. D. H. Lawrence on Screen: Re-Visioning Prose Style in the Films of "The Rocking-Horse Winner," Sons and Lovers, and Women in Love
Jane Jaffe Young. D. H. Lawrence on Screen: Re-Visioning Prose Style in the Films of "The Rocking-Horse Winner," Sons and Lovers, and Women in Love. New York: Peter Lang, 1999. Pp. ix + 351. $65 (cloth). Jane Jaffe Young's D. H. Lawrence on Screen...
Read preview Overview
Douglas Wuchina. Destinies of Splendor: Sexual Attraction in D. H. Lawrence
Douglas Wuchina. Destinies of Splendor: Sexual Attraction in D. H. Lawrence. New York: Peter Lang, 2009. Pp. viii + 242. $74.95 (cloth). Dennis Wuchina, an independent scholar, appeared in Volume 31, number 3 of the D. H. Lawrence Review with an...
Read preview Overview
Barry J. Scherr. D. H. Lawrence Today: Literature, Culture, Politics
Barry J. Scherr. D. H. Lawrence Today: Literature, Culture, Politics. New York: Peter Lang, 2004. Pp. viii + 458. $81.95 (cloth). Barry J. Scherr. Love and Death in Lawrence and Foucault. New York: Peter Lang: 2008. Pp. viii + 396. $86.95 (cloth)....
Read preview Overview
Jack Stewart. Color, Space, and Creativity: Art and Ontology in Five British Writers
Jack Stewart. Color, Space, and Creativity: Art and Ontology in Five British Writers. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2008. Pp. 320. $63.50 (cloth) The five British writers of Jack Stewart's engaging study--Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, Joyce...
Read preview Overview
Bradley W. Buchanan. Oedipus against Freud: Myth and the End(s) of Humanism in Twentieth-Century British Literature
Bradley W. Buchanan. Oedipus Against Freud: Myth and the End(s) of Humanism in Twentieth-Century British Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010. Pp. x + 200. $45 (cloth). This book aims at modifying the general belief that the influence...
Read preview Overview
Carol E. Leon. Movement and Belonging: Lines, Places, and Spaces of Travel
Carol E. Leon. Movement and Belonging: Lines, Places, and Spaces of Travel. New York: Peter Lang, 2009. Pp. viii +256. $76.95 (cloth). We have all read monographs whose theoretical components drag them down; less often, we read those which analyze...
Read preview Overview
Rudolph Glitz. Writing the Victorians: The Early Twentieth-Century Family Chronicle
Rudolph Glitz. Writing the Victorians: The Early Twentieth-Century Family Chronicle. Heidelberg: Universitatsverlag, 2009. Pp. viii + 228. 36 [euro] (paper). Virginia Woolf famously disparaged Arnold Bennett (among others) as a "materialist" in...
Read preview Overview
Joel Pfister. Individuality Incorporated: Indians and the Multicultural Modern
Joel Pfister. Individuality Incorporated: Indians and the Multicultural Modern. Durham: Duke UP, 2004. Pp. xvi + 340. $24.95 (paper). U.S. Indian policy and non-native public discourse from the 1870s to the 1930s can be conceptualized as attempting...
Read preview Overview
Serena Cenni and Nick Ceramella, Eds. Il Corpo, la Fiamma, Il Desiderio: D. H. Lawrence, Firenze E la Sfida Di Lady Chatterley [Body, Flame, Desire: D. H. Lawrence, Florence and the Challenge of Lady Chatterley]
Serena Cenni and Nick Ceramella, eds. Il corpo, la fiamma, il desiderio: D. H. Lawrence, Firenze e la sfida di Lady Chatterley [Body, Flame, Desire: D. H. Lawrence, Florence and the Challenge of Lady Chatterley]. Florence: Consiglio Regionale della...
Read preview Overview
Mark Kinkead-Weekes
Mark Kinkead-Weekes, who died a few weeks short of his eightieth birthday on March 7, 2011, was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He studied at the University of Cape Town, where he distinguished himself sufficiently to be awarded a Rhodes scholarship....
Read preview Overview
H. M. Daleski
H(illel) M(atthew) Bill Daleski, Professor Emeritus of English at Hebrew University, died in Israel in December 2010 at the age of 84. Bill was one of the most eminent Lawrence scholars of his generation. His first book, The Forked Flame: A Study of...
Read preview Overview

No. 34-35, January

D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers and the Culture of Sacrifice
The "culture of sacrifice" of the title of this essay spans a wide range of literal and symbolic meanings, at least two of which have profound resonances for a reading of Sons and Lovers. While the practice of individual self-sacrifice is pervasive...
Read preview Overview
Using the Lens of Keirsian Temperament Theory to Explain Character and Conflict in D. H. Lawrence's "The Horse Dealer's Daughter"
Keirsian temperament theory is an elucidating critical lens through which to analyze character and explain the underlying motivations for a character's words and actions. The opening scene of "The Horse Dealer's Daughter," which depicts the Pervin...
Read preview Overview
Transcendental Climbing: Lawrence, Wordsworth, and Romantic Uplift
Because of its melding of natural piety with sexual energy, the oeuvre of D.H. Lawrence might be summed up as Wordsworth Eroticized. Admittedly, such a handily compact label would amount to a drastic oversimplification. To begin with, it elides the...
Read preview Overview
Hester and the Homo-Social Order: An Uncanny Search for Subjectivity in D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner"
On one level, "The Rocking-Horse Winner" focuses on the way a young boy becomes obsessed with gambling. On another level, however, Lawrence also centers on the way the young boy's neurosis directly results from his relationship with his mother. Indeed,...
Read preview Overview
The Philosophy of Life-Worship: D.H. Lawrence and Aldous Huxley
At the end of Those Barren Leaves (1925), Huxley's would-be mystic Calamy retires to a cottage in the Apuan Alps in order to investigate ultimate reality by dint of meditation, introspection, and celibacy. In Huxley's next novel, Point Counter Point...
Read preview Overview