Generations

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 1, Spring

Adaptations to an Aging Workforce: Innovative Responses by the Corporate Sector
Farsighted businesses have been responding to an aging workforce since the late 1990s. As baby boomers enter their 50s and 60s, many organizations have found that they needed to reexamine the old laborforce model whereby older workers were continually...
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Ageism in the Workplace
Despite the fact the United States' Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) has been in place for over 35 years, age discrimination in employment remains pervasive.-Laurie McCann, senior attorney, AARP Litigation FoundationAgeism is part of the social...
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A Longer Worklife: The New Road to Volunteering
Historically, the many older adults who take up volunteering upon leaving the workforce have been thought to do so maini)' because volunteering was one of the few formal roles available to them. Now, however, widi changing demographics and expectations...
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Between a Twentieth- and a Twenty-First-Century Workforce: Employers at the Tipping Point
The name given to that one dramatic moment in an epidemic when everything can change all at once is the Tipping Point.-Gladwell, 2002The aging of the population is at last becoming visible to employers. The market orientation of many employers is shifting...
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Employment in Later Life: A Focus on Race/Ethnicity and Gender
Until recendy, the central focus of researchers, business leaders, and policy makers interested in the labor-force behavior of older people was primarily on die phenomenon of early retirement. Namely, what factors promote exit from the labor force, and...
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Introduction: The Aging Workforce: Ready or Not
Many baby boomers have fond memories of playing games of Hide and Seek on warm summer evenings. Twilight is usually the best time for this game because the shadows invite the game players to stretch their imaginations. And there is the practical side...
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Not So Big Jobs and Retirements: What Workers (and Retirees) Really Want
Most workers would like to put in fewer hours on the job, and most retirees, at least those in their 50s, 60s, and 70s, would like to have a job, but not work full time, according to a number of studies (e.g., Clarkberg and Moen, 2001; Jacobs and Gerson,...
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Older Workers and the Labor Market: Lessons from Abroad
The economic chailenges of population aging are seen throughout the world. This article examines the response of European public policy and businesses, particularly as they wresde with increasing competition. What is the future place of older workers...
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Opportunities for Entrepreneurship in Later Life
Stuart J was a s8-year-old executive with a Fortune soo technology company that sold computer systems to large retail companies. Stuart had become an expert in supply-chain management, financial transactions, inventory control, and employee training,...
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Our Guest Editors: Talk about the Aging Workforce
What some might call a perfect storm is now brewing as baby boomers approach traditional retirement age just in time to intersea with the "new economy," a decreasing supply of younger workers, and major shifts in private pension and public income-maintenance...
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The Aging Workforce: Is Demography Destiny?
The United States, along with the rest of the developed world, is in the midst of a demographic transformation. Roughly thirty-five years ago, the baby boom generation-along with record numbers of women-went to work, reshaping the U.S. workforce and...
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The Changing Landscape of Work
When one travels long distances in a car, the landscape often looks similar over time. Yes, cities and communities come and go, but the basic background seems to stay the same. Then suddenly, one notices that everything has changed. The barren red desert...
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The Evolving Role of Public Policy in Promoting Work and Retirement
Recent years have seen major shifts in attitudes about and opportunities for older adults in the American labor force. A century's pattern of many such workers being unable, unwilling, or reluctant to remain in the labor force in their later years has...
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The Meanings of Work for Older Workers
Gerontologists have studied die meanings of work for older workers for more than half a century (e.g., Friedmann and Havighurst, 1954; AItschuler, 2004; Drenth, 1991; Gill, 1999). Widi die domestic and global aging of the labor force, employers, policy...
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The Older Worker, Job Insecurity, and the New Economy
In the latter part of the twentieth century, the contours of the job market and the labor force shifted in profound ways. Among die major changes are the increased prevalence of dual-earner couples, a heightened importance placed on technological skills,...
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The State of Phased Retirement: Facts, Figures, and Policies
While age 60, which the first of the baby boomers hit last year, is a time when many people traditionally begin thinking about full retirement, many people today, both employees and employers, are no longer thinking about retirement as all or nodiing....
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