Studia Musicologica

An international journal of musicology.

Articles

Vol. 53, No. 1-3, September

Introduction
The Budapest Bartok Archives of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences was created in 1961 to preserve, catalogue, and study the papers (compositional sources, folksong transcriptions, scholarly writings, correspondence, library, and various other documents)...
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Programme of the Colloquium
Introductory SessionJuly 15, FridayBudapestOpening AddressTallián, Tibor (Director of the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest)Bartók: Nine Little Piano Pieces (1926) BB 90, vols. II-IIIZsuzsa Takács on the Bösendorfer...
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Four Observations, to Read in Ten Minutes, about Modern Thematic Catalogues in Music
Abstract: The paper is meant to be an introduction to László Somfai's lecture on the Béla Bartók Thematic Catalogue in progress to be published by G. Henle Verlag. The author calls attention to a wealth of new thematic catalogues in print. The mutual...
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The Béla Bartók Thematic Catalog in Progress1
Abstract: At the Bartók International Congress 2000 in Austin, Texas, I discussed basic questions related to the forthcoming Bartók thematic catalog with the temporary text of the entry ? ? 50 Fourteen Bagatelles as a sample. Thank to the interest of...
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Contrasts? Practical and Abstract Ideas in Bartók's Compositional Process*
Abstract: Most analyses of Bartók's Contrasts focus on abstract compositional ideas such as musical language, form, and motivic unity. Manuscript sources, however, show that practical considerations played an equally important role in the compositional...
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Bartók's Bulgarian Dances and the Order of Things1
Abstract: Bartók's "Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm," the only formally self-con- tained set within the Mikrokosmos, is the crowning series of pieces in this huge com- pendium of the composer s later piano music. Since Bartok recorded all six of them...
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Bartók's Viola Concerto Manuscript: Some Questions and Speculations
Abstract: The question of authenticity in the creation of Bartók's Viola Concerto has been one of the most enigmatic in the viola repertoire. Inconsistencies among revi- sions of the work by different scholars since the first attempt by Tibor Serly in...
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Bartók Performance Practice through Correspondence
Abstract: Questions of source, style and interpretation have been central to the work of the Budapest Bartok Archives over its first half-century. The author looks at various issues of work genesis, structure, and interpretation, in works by Mahler and...
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Critical Edition with or without Notes for the Performer*
Abstract: The concept of the historisch-kritische Gesamtausgabe series of the 1950s (the New Bach, Mozart, Haydn, etc., editions) is rightly questioned today. Not least because for the sake of making an impeccable text of a scholarly edition a certain...
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The Music of Words in Béla Bartók's Twenty-Seven Choruses*
Abstract: Bartók s two- and three-part choruses for children's and female voices are his best-known choral works worldwide. Nevertheless, the cycle as a whole does not enjoy a wide popularity outside of Hungary. The reason for this lies in the fact that,...
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Vol. 51, No. 3/4, September

József Ujfalussy 1920-2010
József Ujfalussy, the editor-in-chief of Studia Musicologica to serve longest in the journal's 51-year history, died in Budapest on January 22, 2010. Such long service is becoming rarer among editors. Professor Ujfalussy took office in a calmer period...
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Originality as Market-Value: Remarks on the Fantasia in C Hob. XVII:4 and Haydn as Musical Entrepreneur
Abstract: The distinction between aesthetic and commercial value emerged in the later eighteenth century under the conditions of an emerging market for literature and music. Such a distinction was sharply pronounced in North German debate on music, especially...
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".They Are Full of Invention, Fire, Good Taste, and New Effects": Two Compositional Essays in the "Erdody" Quartets Op. 76
Abstract: The study revisits Haydn's Erdody Quartets with the premise that it was Haydn's intention to copy the scores of three of the six - in D minor, B-flat and E-flat - as exemplum for his own library, and there is no reason to assume that such scores...
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Haydn, Hoffmann, and the Opera of Instruments
Abstract: In 1809, E. T. A. Hoffmann declared that the symphony, in the hands of Haydn and Mozart, had become the "opera of instruments." This view of symphony, which was echoed by other writers of the period, reflected how composers engaged with instruments...
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Recapitulation as Process: The Augmented-Second Tetrachord in the First Movement of Haydn's Op. 33, No. 5
Abstract: The first movement of Haydn's Op. 33, no. 5 string quartet famously opens with a closing gesture - a move from dominant to tonic chord accompanying a rising tetrachord. This opening puts the entire notion of closure into question and threatens...
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Does a 'Monothematic' Expositional Design Have Tautological Implications for the Recapitulation? an Alternative Approach to 'Altered Recapitulations' in Haydn
Abstract: 'Altered recapitulations,' commonly regarded as a distinguishing feature of Joseph Haydn's sonata form movements, are usually explained in terms of the 'monothematic' design of the exposition. According to the logic used in such analytical...
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Formenlehre Goes to the Opera: Examples from Armida and Elsewhere
Abstract: One of the more surprising developments in recent American music theory has been the revival of interest in traditional, as opposed to Schenkerian, approaches to musical form. Spearheading this renewal are William Caplin's 1998 treatise Classical...
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A Peculiarity in Haydn's Early Symphonic Work: Form and Possible Sources of the First Movement of Symphony Hob. I:21
Abstract: Among the first forty symphonies that Joseph Haydn wrote up to 1765, Symphony Hob. I:21 has a slow first movement that does not resemble any other, since it is not based on the usual mid-18th-century ternary or binary sonata form; its structure...
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Vol. 51, No. 1/2, March

Becoming a Complete Kapellmeister: Haydn and Mattheson's der Vollkommene Capellmeister
Abstract: Both Griesinger and Dies identify Johann Mattheson's treatise, Der vollkommene Capellmeister (1739), as an important influence on Haydn's musical development in his youth. Perhaps because Griesinger then gives more emphasis to Fux than Mattheson,...
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Between Tradition, Innovation and Utopia: Haydn's Mehrstimmige Gesänge
Abstract: Haydn's mehrstimmige Gesänge, composed between 1796 and 1799, have mostly been given but scarce attention by scholars. In this paper I strive to re-contextualize the partsongs both as regards Haydn's own oeuvre and the history of the genre...
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Comic Readings and Tragic Readings: Haydn's Observations on London Audience Responses in 1791
Abstract: This paper explores the iconography of two prints owned by Haydn, the traditions to which they belonged and their aesthetic consequences. The prints depict two contrasting audiences, one amused and the other despondent, and feature a range...
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David Wyn Jones, the Life of Haydn
David Wyn Jones, The Life of Haydn (Cambridge University Press, 2009 ISBN: 9780521895743)It was high time that in the 'Musical lives' series by Cambridge University Press the biography of Joseph Haydn should appear. As No. 17 in the list of composers,...
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Haydn as 'Minimalist': Rethinking Exoticism in the Trios of the 1760s and 1770s
Abstract: A number of Haydn's minuet movements from the 1760s and 1770s contain sparsely scored trio sections in which a single musical idea is repeated continuously, even obsessively. In these trios - of which the most distinctive are in Symphonies...
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Haydn, Meter, and Listening in Transition
Abstract: In recent years, music theorists and analysts have devoted a great deal of attention to the phenomenon of hypermeter, drawing some of their most representative examples from the late works of Haydn. Although this recent trend in analysis has...
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Haydn-Gellert, Betrachtung Des Todes: A Meeting of Tradition and Innovation
Abstract: Haydn's Betrachtung des Todes, a late little masterpiece by the composer, represents the simultaneity of the old and the new. The text is the second verse of Gellert's fourteen-verse poem 'Wie sicher lebt der Mensch, der Staub!', No. 50 in...
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Haydns Sinfonien: Besetzungsprobleme Und Aufführungstraditionen
Abstract: To this day, Joseph Haydn's symphonies are often performed and recorded in a way that does not meet the composer's intentions. This concerns certain variants of instrumentation, e.g. the rendering of violoncello obbligato with a single instrument,...
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Haydn's Judaizing of the Apothecary
Abstract: As the first Italian opera to grace the stage of the new opera house at Eszterháza, Lo speziale (1768) afforded Kapellmeister Haydn, and the singers and orchestral musicians under his direction, the opportunity to revel in comedic performance....
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Haydn's Sensibility
Abstract: Recent interpretations of both Haydn's personality (as a man) and his musical style (or 'persona') have focused on the two opposed categories earnestness and wit. The present essay adds a third category on both sides of the equation: sensibility...
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Introduction
It does not deserve extensive substantiation why Hungary found it crucial to amply commemorate the bicentenary of Joseph Haydn's death. As one of the great composers of the second half of the 18th century Haydn was linked to this country through many...
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Mid-Section Cadences in Haydn's Sonata-Form Movements
Abstract: Although a half cadence marks the end of the transition section in most sonata-form expositions and recapitulations, in many of Haydn's sonata-form movements - especially those from around the 1760s - the end of the transition is instead articulated...
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'Newness Which Never Perishes'? Schoenberg's Ambivalent Reception of Haydn
Abstract: This paper explores Arnold Schoenberg's curious ambivalence towards Haydn. Schoenberg recognized Haydn as an important figure in the German serious music tradition, but never closely examined or clearly articulated Haydn's influence and import...
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Time out of Joint - Time Set Right: Principles of Form in Haydn's Symphony No. 39
Abstract: The opening of Haydn's Symphony No. 39 in G minor is interrupted by two unusually long grand pauses. These brief suspensions of the time continuum reveal Haydn's search for new narrative strategies for a genre caught up in the tensions between...
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Vol. 50, No. 3/4, September

Form, Meaning and Genre in the Scherzo of Mahler's Second Symphony*
Abstract: This study offers a multilevel analysis of the form of the third movement of Mahler's Second Symphony providing three frameworks (those of a sophisticated trio form, a bipartite idiosyncratic form, and an imaginary, 'endless' form). Conceiving...
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The Reception of Post-Tridentine Cantus Romanus in 17th- and 18th-Century Hungary
Abstract: As local traditions of the Catholic Church were suppressed in the 17th century, so Esztergom, the ecclesiastical centre of Hungary was deprived of its medieval rite and associated style of Gregorian chant. The place and function of the earlier...
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Spisský Graduál Juraja Z Kezmarku Z Roku 1426 Graduale Scepusiense Georgii De Kesmark Anni 1426
Spissky graduál Jurajaz Kezmarku z roku 1426 Graduale Scepusiense Georgii de Kesmark anni 1426Edited by Amantius Akimjak, Rastislav Adamko and Janka Bednáriková(Ruzomberok, 2006, 605 pp.)Only fragments survive of a once-rich corpus of codices containing...
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Vol. 50, No. 1/2, March

Bartók and Scarlatti: A Study of Motives and Influence*
Abstract: The long-held notion that Bartók's style represents a unique synthesis of features derived from folk music, from the works of his best contemporaries, as well as from the great classical masters has resulted in a certain asymmetry in Bartók...
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Berg and Modernity: Ambivalence, Synthesis, and Remaking of Tradition in the String Quartet Op. 3
Abstract: Alban Berg has long been seen as the most conservative member of the Second Viennese School, a 'moderate modernist', an accessible throwback to Romanticism for audiences afraid of the supposedly more radical innovations of Schoenberg or Webern,...
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A Hybrid Form: The Second Movement of Ernst Von Dohnányi's String Quartet in A Major (Op. 7)*
Abstract: The form of the second movement of the String Quartet in A major, Op. 7 is original not only in Dohnányi's oeuvre but in music history in general, as well. This new musical idea is a fusion of two traditional forms: a variation and a ternary...
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Jewish Identities
Klára Móricz, Jewish Identities (University of California Press, 2008, 352 pp. + bibliography, notes, index)Klára Móricz introduces her study with a statement of her own personal identity as a scholar:My interest in the topic of identities, their musical...
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Vol. 49, No. 3/4, September

'A "New Music" from Nothing': György Ligeti's Musica Ricercata
(Received: March 2008; accepted: June 2008)Abstract: The beginning of the 1950s marks a turning-point in György Ligeti's early career. By that time Ligeti had become disappointed regarding his rather marginal position in Hungarian musical life, and he...
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Several Stages - One Piano: Philological and Compositional Problems with Reference to Liszt's Unfinished or Fragmentary Rossini Arrangements*
(Received: January 2008; accepted April 2008)Abstract: The following study starts out from the examination of two fragmentary piano compositions by Liszt: Introduction des variations sur une marche du Siège de Corinthe and Maometto Fantasy, which were...
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The Liszt-Listmann Incident
(Received: March 2008; accepted: May 2008)Abstract: Before ending his performance career by concerts in Odessa and Elizabethgrad in 1847, Franz Liszt visited Istanbul, gave a number of public concerts and performed twice for Sultan Abdul-Medgid in the...
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'Unhealthy' and 'Ugly' Music or a 'Compass Pointing towards a Purer Art of Superior Quality'? the Early Reception of Debussy in Hungary (1900-1918)*
(Received: February 2008; accepted May 2008)Abstract: It is sufficiently well documented how Kodály and Bartók discovered the music of Claude Debussy in 1907, albeit Debussy's music was not unknown in Hungary at least since the first performance of his...
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The Significance of the Varieties of Parlando-Rubato in the Rhythmic Language of Bluebeard's Castle*
(Received: February 2008; accepted: May 2008)Abstract: 'Parlando-rubato' rhythm in Bartók's thinking, does not mean complete rhythmic freedom; it is not necessarily accompanied by rubato tempi or rubato modes of interpretation. Musical declamation approximating...
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Bartók: 'Bear Dance'*
(Received: October 2007; accepted January 2008)Abstract: 'Bear Dance' (German 'Bärentanz') appears to have been a lesser-known nineteenth- century character piece exemplified by Schumann's two related compositions in A minor, Twelve Pieces for Four Hands,...
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New Edition of the Complete Works
Franz Liszt, New Edition of the Complete Works Supplements to Works for Piano Solo, vol. 5 Edited by Adrienne Kaczmarczyk and Imre Mezô (Budapest: Editio Musica, 2007, 185 p.)The New Liszt Edition (NLE) is much improved in recent years. Originally proceeding...
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Lajos Vargyas (1914-2007)
One of the most prominent figures of Hungarian ethnomusicology and folklore research, Lajos Vargyas, has left us his oeuvre as a valuable gift for researchers and connoisseurs of folk music and folklore.Born in Budapest, from 1932 to 1937 Vargyas studied...
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Béla Bartók's Arab Music Research and Composition
(Received: February 2008; accepted: May 2008)Abstract: In 1913 Béla Bartók traveled to Algeria to research Arab folk music. He took with him the most modern technological device then available, the Edison phonograph, and recorded Arab peasants performing...
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Vol. 49, No. 1/2, March

The Responsory: Type and Modulation
Abstract: The responsory - a genre originated in early period of Gregorian chant, but also increasing in number until the end of the Middle Ages - is expected as transmitted in a rather stable melodic shape. The paper lists and analyses, however, 27...
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After Mozart: The Viennese Piano Scene in the 1790s*
Abstract: The last decade of the eighteenth century was a transitional period in the political as well as the cultural history of Europe. Aesthetic values underwent far-reaching changes everywhere: the field of keyboard music and keyboard performance...
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The Hungarian Folk Song in the 18th Century*
Abstract: In Hungary, the concept of "folk song" was clarified at the beginning of the 20th century only, accordingly, there were no "folk songs" noted down in the 18th century. Still, the number of music sources relating to folk music increased significantly...
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The English Ballad Singer and Hidden History
Abstract: Drawing on Pierre Macherey's location of 'real history' in the silences and gaps of the historical record, this paper studies the changing role of the paid singer in England. Although singers and musicians in England have been rewarded for...
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Music History - Conference History
Speaking of Music: Music Conferences, 1835-1966 General editors: James R. Cowdery, Zdravko Bla£ekovic?, Barry S. Brook (New York: RILM, 2004)When Barry S. Brook, the pre-eminent American musicologist - professor at the City University of New York and...
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Vol. 48, No. 3/4, September

Liszt and the Mozart Connection*
Abstract: The life and works of Mozart are central to a due understanding of Liszt's development as pianist, composer, and conductor. Yet, this fact receives inadequate attention in scholarly studies. Liszt readily acknowledged that he 'owed the greater...
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Scherzo and the Unheimlich: The Construct of Genre and Feeling in the Long 19th Century*
Abstract: The psychological concept of the uncanny ("das Unheimliche") has been established in studies by E. Jentsch (1906) and S. Freud (1919). On the grounds of cultural and textual references, which can be found in these studies, one might regard...
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Vol. 48, No. 1/2, March

"Pure Music"? Dohnányi's Passacaglia for Solo Flute*
Abstract: After his emigration from Hungary and a longer stay in Austria and Argentina, Dohnányi settled down in Tallahassee (USA) in 1949 and lived there until his death in 1960. Besides his professorship at the Florida State University (FSU) and his...
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Form Created by Performance: Bartók's Recording of His Improvisations Op. 20
Abstract: Bartók's "Continental" 1942 recording of Improvisations op. 20 provides us with invaluable insights into his aesthetics and nature. This is a special case study in which Bartók redesign the composition through his performance. In this rendition...
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In Beethoven's and Wagner's Footsteps: Phrase Structures and Satzketten in the Instrumental Music of Béla Bartók*
Abstract: Recent studies of formal structure in themes in the Classical repertoire (William Caplin) as well as the music of Wagner (Matthew BaileyShea) point towards the enormous importance and potential of the Sentence phrase structure with its hybrid...
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Vol. 47, No. 3/4, September

Conference Program
Opening Ceremony of the Conference (21March, 2006)GreetingTALLIÁN, Tibor (Director of the Institute for Musicology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest)GreetingVIZI, E. Szilveszter (President of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences)Opening AddressSOMFAI,...
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Musical Symbolism in Bartók's Bluebeard: Trauma, Gender, and the Unfolding of the Unconscious
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: The intention in this lecture is to explore the means by which Bartók's Duke Bluebeard's Castle (1911) transforms the harmonic structures of the traditional major/minor scale system into a new...
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"The Untouchable: Bartók and the Scatological"
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: In his book about his father Peter Bartók told stories about the composer that had never seen print before. Most surprising perhaps for readers used to the image of the rigorous, disciplined,...
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Bartók's Late Adventures with Kontrapunkt
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: Zoltán Kodály, writing in 1950 about Bartók "the folklorist," recalled his friend's belated study of Palestrina and Jeppesen's counterpoint treatise. Whereas Bach had a prominent role in Bartók's...
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Axis Tonality and Golden Section Theory Reconsidered
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: After three decades of our personal, publicly conducted discussions with Ernõ Lendvai, in 1999 I raised again my objections related to his theories at a conference organized in memory of Bence...
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Nationalism, Exoticism, or Concessions to the Audience? Motivations Behind Bartók's Folksong Settings
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: Folksong settings are usually the least appreciated works of a composer. Focusing on Bartók's guiding principles in creating folksong settings, the author examines the motivations that have driven...
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Different Images: A Case Study on Bartók Reception in Denmark
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: The Danish Bartók reception undergoes significant changes and constitutes at least two distinct Bartók images: First we meet the "international", "modernist" Bartók, seen as one of the representatives...
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Why You Cannot Leave Bartók Out
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: The astonishing omission of Bartók - inadvertent, but justified by the editor ex post facto - from the recent Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Music prompts reflection on why Bartók is such...
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Introduction
"The name of Bartók - quite independently of anniversaries - is a symbol of great thoughts."1 Fifty years ago, at a commemorative Bartók session, Zoltán Kodály started his opening address with these words. The first "great thought" he mentioned was "search...
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Bartók's "Fallow Years": A Reappraisal
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: Bartók's biographers have often constructed their portraits around his production of original compositions. While this is understandable it leaves gaps in some of the earlier years of each decade...
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Perfect Notation in Historical Context: The Case of Bartók's String Quartets
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: The string quartets of Bartók, each written in a considerably different style, as a six-piece series became from the 1950s on an almost unrivaled standard of the 20th- century repertoire in this...
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Sibelius, Bartók, and the "Anxiety of Influence" in Post World War II Finnish Music
(Received: 25 March 2006; accepted: 25 May 2006)Abstract: Jean Sibelius and Béla Bartók, two composers from the fringe of Europe, had to create space for themselves in the midst of Austro-German dominance of turn-of-the-century music. Both encountered...
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Opening Address
On the occasion of Béla Bartók's 125th birthday ameeting of Bartók scholars from all over the world in the Budapest Bartók Archives is an exclusive event. For the next three days we walk out of the celebrations and ritual acts to focus on the orbit and...
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Vol. 47, No. 2, June

Alternative Bar Stuctures in Bartók's Music
Abstract: Already in some of Bartók's juvenile compositions, a definite attraction is manifested for the irregular rhythmics. This is an early appearance of additive metrics, opposed to the conventional divisive one. An extremely rich selection for irregular...
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Wagner's Edition of Palestrina's Stabat Mater
Abstract: RichardWagner's edition of the Stabat mater by Palestrina calls for a special attention among the 19th century transcriptions and practice editions of the work, since Franz Liszt declared it to be a masterpiece to be followed by others throughout...
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Bartók's Collection of Hungarian Instrumental Folk Music and Its System*
Abstract: Béla Bartók's collection of Hungarian instrumental folk music is known only for Hungarian Bartók scholars and ethnomusicologists although Bartók's permanent interest in folk musical instruments, and instruments in general, manifesting itself...
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Vol. 47, No. 1, March

Liszt's Plan for a German Année De Pèlerinage "Was Ist Des DeutschenVaterland?"*
(Received: April 2005; accepted: September 2005)Abstract: According to the evidence of an entry in the so-called Lichnowsky sketchbook, at the beginning of the 1840s, Franz Liszt proposed - in addition to the Swiss and Italian books - also a German volume...
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The Galvanoplastic Replica of a Peter Cornelius Sketch for His Dante Ceiling Fresco in the Budapest Liszt Estate*
(Received: March 2005; accepted: May 2005)Abstract: This study examines a piece of smith's work preserved in the permanent exhibition of the Budapest Liszt Ferenc Memorial Memorial Museum, which portrays scenes from the Paradise of Dante's Divina Commedia....
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Renaissance Music in Croatia. Some Introductionary Remarks
(Received: June 2004; accepted: May 2005)Abstract: Renaissance Music in Croatia is still little recognized in wider international context. In the study some general remarks on the topic are given, namely on theoreticians and academies, on folk music...
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