Journal of Humanistic Counseling

A scholarly journal devoted to the development of humanistic counseling and education practices in schools. Publishes original research and critical reviews emphasizing innovative programs and practices that promote tolerance, nurture diversity, and uphol

Articles

Vol. 52, No. 1, April

Editor's Note
In my 20s, I composed a credo that has directed my life, namely, to "live life in pursuit of one's anticipations and never out of one's expectations." At that time, and for many years after, I never expected to become the editor of The Journal of Humanistic...
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The Human Factor: Student Reactions to the Integration of Personal Dispositions into a Counseling Program
The authors explored student reactions to the integration of personal dispositions, or characteristic attitudes, into a counseling program. Results suggested participants Iiked focusing on personal dispositions and were able to identify areas of personal...
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A Qualitative Exploration of Counseling Students' Perception of Altruism
Empathy is essential to the therapeutic relationship (Rogers, 1957). Altruism appears to be related to empathy, but there has been limited research investigating its development in counselors. This qualitative study explored the development of altruism...
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Evidence for the Utility of a Photovoice Task as an Empathic Skill Acquisition Strategy among Counselors-in-Training
An instructional technique derived from photovoice was compared with a didactic approach for empathic skill acquisition among 38 master's-level counselors-in-training. Participants in the photovoice condition demonstrated marked improvements in quality...
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Developing the Counselor as a Person and as a Professional: Attitudinal Changes in Core Counseling Courses
This quantitative pilot study examined changes in counseling students' professional attitudes in 3 master's-level core courses. Results indicated significantly more change occurred during an ethics course than during the other courses. Changes occurred...
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Burnout and Job Satisfaction among Counselor Educators
The relationship between burnout and job satisfaction among counselor educators was investigated. A total of 220 full-time counselor educators participated in this quantitative research study. Emotional exhaustion seemed to be the most significant...
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Orienting Counseling Students toward Multiculturalism: Exploring Privilege during a New Student Orientation
New counseling students often have strong reactions to the concept of privilege and become anxious when expected to address issues of multiculturalism personally and professionally. In this article, the authors describe a new student orientation model...
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Counseling Supervision within a Feminist Framework: Guidelines for Intervention
Feminist supervision is based on the principles of feminist theory. Goals include sharing responsibility for the supervision process, empowering the supervisee, attending to the contextual assumptions about clients, and analyzing gender roles. This...
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Taking the Fear out of Suicide Assessment and Intervention: A Pedagogical and Humanistic Practice
This article provides ideas for teaching suicide assessment and intervention according to differing student learning styles and preferences. The authors discuss how considering the learning styles and uniqueness of counselors-in-training while assessing...
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Vol. 51, No. 2, October

Introduction to the Special Issue
As the editor of the Journal of Humanistic Counseling (JHC), I have the pleasure of reading manuscripts from many leading scholars in our profession. This is why, when I first read Hansen's manuscript that inspired this special issue of JHC, I was...
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Extending the Humanistic Vision: Toward a Humanities Foundation for the Counseling Profession
Founding humanists argued that counseling should be ideologically grounded in the humanities. Currently, professional counseling culture is largely structured by scientific assumptions, which, the author maintains, have had a detrimental impact on...
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Humanities and Science: A Necessary Unity for the Counseling Profession
This article is a reply to Hansen's (2012) call for the counseling profession to embrace a purely humanistic ideology for counseling. The authors suggest the relationship between humanities and science set forth by Hansen does not emphasize the both-and...
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Rejoinder to Guterman, Martin, and Kopp
In their reply to the author's keystone article (Hansen, 2012), Guterman, Martin, and Kopp (2012) charge that the author's integrative framework was not sufficiently integrative. They also argue that his proposal results in logical contradictions and...
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Extending the Dialogue about Science and Humanities in Counseling: A Reply to Hansen
This is a reply to Hansen's (2012b) rejoinder to the authors (Guterman, Martin, & Kopp, 2012), which is a response to Hansen's (2012a) keystone article about the relationship between humanities and science in counseling. In this reply, the authors...
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A Return to the Human in Humanism: A Response to Hansen's Humanistic Vision
In his extension of the humanistic vision, Hansen (2012) recommends that counseling practitioners and scholars adopt operations that are consistent with his definition of a multiple-perspective philosophy. Alternatively, the author of this article...
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Rejoinder to Lemberger
Lemberger (2012) argues that the author (Hansen, 2012) has no basis for recommending differential weightings or priorities to humanism and science, because those ideologies are only meaningful as they are subjectively interpreted within the counseling...
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A Reply to Hansen's Cultural Humanism
Hansen (2012b) responds to the author's (Lemberger, 2012) critique of his humanistic vision by dividing their arguments as either individual or cultural in design. In this reply, the author contends that the individual cannot be extracted from her...
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Further Extending the Humanistic Vision for the Future of Counseling: A Response to Hansen
This article offers additional support for Hansen's (2012) position that humanism and a renewed respect for human complexity are essential to counseling. In the article, the author also speaks to the critical importance of continuing to ground the...
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Rejoinder to Brady-Amoon
The author agrees with virtually all of Brady-Amoon's (2012) conclusions. However, Brady-Amoon and the author disagree about some of the theoretical points that lead to these shared conclusions. He overviews these disagreements and highlights their...
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Reaffirming the Role of Science and Diversity in Counseling: A Reply to Hansen
Overall, Hansen (2012a) and the author (Brady-Amoon, 2012) share a humanistic vision for the future of counseling. In this continued dialogue, the author argues that a broad-based philosophy of science that encompasses renewed respect for diversity...
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Response to Hansen: Economic Pressures, Not Science, Undermine Humanistic Counseling
The author contends that it was economic interests, not reductionist scientific methods, that displaced the humanities as the basis for counseling profession. Attacking scientific methods may inadvertently marginalize humanistic counselors. Instead,...
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Rejoinder to Leibert
Leibert (2012) argues that economic and policy interests have caused counseling culture to be structured according to the values of traditional scientific ideology. He proposes that a postpositivist paradigm would move counseling beyond the restrictive...
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Reply to Hansen
Hansen (2012a) and the author are both concerned about trends in the counseling culture toward oversimplification. Their disagreement is, principally, about the locus of debate. The Author responds to Hansen's counterarguments with the ultimate hope...
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The Function of Scientific and Humanistic Ideologies in the Counseling Profession from the Perspective of Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory: A Response to Hansen
In this response, the author addresses Hansen's (2012) call for the counseling profession to substitute science with humanities as its primary ideology. The author uses Epstein's (1994) cognitive-experiential self-theory to show that an equal appreciation...
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Rejoinder to V. Suthakaran
V. Suthakaran (2012) uses cognitive--experiential self-theory as the basis for his argument that the humanities and science should have equal ideological status in the counseling profession. The author disagrees with this basic thesis and some of the...
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Rejoinder to Hansen
Hansen (2012b) reiterates his view that the humanities should form the ideological foundation of the counseling profession by challenging the validity of the central premises for the author's argument that the humanities and science should have equal...
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Extending the Humanistic Vision: Closing Thoughts
The author reflects on the collaborations that led to this special issue. The author also reviews some of his original ideas, comments on the values embodied in this issue, and outlines some of his hopes for the future of the counseling profession....
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Vol. 51, No. 1, April

Humanism Is Alive and Well: A Review of Humanistic Perspectives on Contemporary Counseling Issues
As a counselor educator, I have the pleasure of teaching counseling theories each year. Last year, after we explored the development of counseling from Freud through current theories, someone asked about the viability of the approaches that embody...
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Association for Humanistic Counseling: The Heart and Conscience of the Counseling Profession
The history of the Association for Humanistic Counseling (AHC) can be traced back to 1931. Organization members documented the early development of the division and progress until the early 1980s in previous publications. In this article, AHC's dynamic...
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Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development Publication Patterns from 1994 to 2009
The authors reviewed publication patterns of articles in the Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development (JHCEAD) from 1994 to 2009. Author demographic characteristics and article content for trends over time were analyzed, as well...
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Arthur Wright Combs: A Humanistic Pioneer
Arthur Wright Combs (1912-1999) championed humanistic counseling and education. He proposed a theory that incorporated humanistic values and cognitive factors. This article features a review of his contributions, an overview of his theory, a synthesis...
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Infusing Cultural Competence and Advocacy into Strength-Based Counseling
Strength-based counseling represents a welcome shift from prevailing deficit perspectives. However, the literature often treats enhancing strengths as an acultural concept, minimizing or ignoring the essential role of culture in forming and defining...
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Gift Giving and Receiving in Child-Centered Play Therapy: An Ethical Response
Child-centered play therapists are often confronted with the challenge of receiving gifts from clients. This article highlights recommended strategies when faced with gift receiving, exemplified by actual ethical dilemmas encountered by child-centered...
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The Inspiration of Hope in Substance Abuse Counseling
This study used a grounded theory method to explore how counselors inspire hope in clients struggling with substance abuse. Findings from 10 participants revealed that hope inspiration occurred in 3 phases and consisted of several categories of hope-inspiring...
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The Rediscovery of Gratitude: Implications for Counseling Practice
Although gratitude has been rediscovered by the field of positive psychology, strength-based wellness-oriented interventions have historically been a part of the humanistic tradition in counseling. The article is a review of emerging gratitude research...
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An Ever-Changing Meaning: A Career Constructivist Application to Working with African Refugees
Refugees are expected to determine how to integrate past experiences into their lives in a new culture. Constructivist approaches to counseling allow refugees opportunities to determine how to integrate these experiences into their future career choices....
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Vol. 50, No. 2, Fall

Introduction to the Special Section
It is with great pleasure that I write this introduction to the special section on social justice counseling, education, and advocacy in the Journal of Humanistic Counseling. First, the full credit for this significant contribution to the professional...
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Expanding the Understanding of the Complementary Nature of Humanistic Principles and Social Justice Practices in Counseling and Education
It is with much humility and gratitude that I write this introduction to the special section of the Journal of Humanistic Counseling on social justice counseling, education, and advocacy. My humility is based on a growing understanding of the complexity...
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Humanism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism: Essential Elements of Social Justice in Counseling, Education, and Advocacy
This article explores the association between and among humanism, feminism, multiculturalism, and social justice in counseling, education, and advocacy. In so doing, it shows how these theoretical forces, individually and collectively, are essential...
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Nurturing the Relationships of All Couples: Integrating Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns into Premarital Education and Counseling Programs
Research shows that premarital counseling programs help engaged couples develop interpersonal and problem-solving skills that enhance their marital relationships. Yet, there are limited services for same-sex couples. This article assumes an integrated...
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Counseling People Living in Poverty: The CARE Model
Counselors frequently counsel clients who live in poverty. The authors describe the new CARE model that addresses the influence of multiple systems on poor clients' experiences. A social justice, humanistic intervention, the CARE model emphasizes cultivating...
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Entering Communities: Social Justice Oriented Disaster Response Counseling
Counselors need to learn how to effectively and respectfully enter into communities hit by disasters and create collaborative partnerships with community members. Using critical consciousness theory, the authors describe a humanistic, culturally responsive...
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Operationalizing Social Justice Counseling: Paradigm to Practice
Social justice counseling, like all humanistic models, recognizes the dignity of each human being, affirms the right of all people to choose and work toward their own goals, and asserts the importance of service to community. The social justice paradigm...
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Implementing a Community Intervention to Promote Social Justice and Advocacy: Analysis of a Town Hall Meeting on Race, Justice, and Peace
A diverse team of counselor educators used a phenomenological qualitative research method to analyze a social justice group intervention--a town hall meeting among a group of students, educators, and mental health professionals that focused on race,...
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Applications in Social Justice Counselor Training: Classroom without Walls
The article addresses an innovative approach to promote social justice counseling and advocacy training in graduate counseling programs. The classroom without walls concept involves innovative counseling practicums and field-based experiences, supervision,...
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Recharging Our Sense of Idealism: Concluding Thoughts
One of the goals of this special section on social justice counseling, education, and advocacy is to expand your thinking about the complementary nature of humanistic principles and social justice counseling and advocacy practices. There is another...
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Wraparound Counseling: An Ecosystemic Approach to Working with Economically Disadvantaged Students in Urban School Settings
Urban schools are faced with challenges such as low academic performance, increased incidents of violence, lack of parental engagement with educators, and school personnel burnout. Wraparound counseling is a holistic prevention tool that combines the...
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Exposure to School Bullying and the Social Capital of Sixth-Grade Students
Data from 91 U.S. middle school students using self-reports of social capital and bullying suggest a link between exposure to bullying and a decreased sense that people in general are trustworthy and fair. Implications for individuals and societies...
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Vol. 50, No. 1, Spring

Ecosystemic Complexity Theory of Conflict: Understanding the Fog of Conflict
Counselors often engage in conflict mediation in professional practice. A model for understanding the complex and subtle nature of conflict resolution is presented. The ecosystemic complexity theory of conflict is offered to assist practitioners in...
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Self-Determination Theory: The Importance of Autonomy to Well-Being across Cultures
According to proponents of self-determination theory, autonomous regulation is a universal psychological human need. Researchers have found autonomy (defined as acting in accordance with one's values) related to well-being across cultures. Encouraging...
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Children and Chronic Sorrow: Reconceptualizing the Emotional Impact of Parental Rejection and Its Treatment
The concept of chronic sorrow offers afresh perspective for understanding the negative emotional impact of parental rejection on children. Additionally, it provides a clinical alternative to coercion for breaking through children's emotional defenses...
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Student Success Skills: An Evidence-Based School Counseling Program Grounded in Humanistic Theory
The Student Success Skills program is an evidence-based, counselor-led intervention founded on a variety of humanistic principles. Five studies and a recent meta-analysis provide evidence that integrating human potential practices into the school by...
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Academic Writing: Reflections from Successful Counselor Educators
Twelve counselor educators were interviewed to learn what developmental and educational experiences help counselors become successful writers. Qualitative analysis resulted in 4 themes that revealed the important role of certain personal qualities...
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A Profile of Adolescent Wellness: Implications for Working with a Help-Seeking Population
This study examined wellness profiles for 114 adolescents receiving counseling services at a local community mental health center. Participants were administered the Five Factor Wellness Inventory-Teenage Version and their responses were compared with...
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Facilitating College Students' Authenticity and Psychological Well-Being through the Use of Mandalas: An Empirical Study
The purpose of this study was twofold: to examine the relationship between authenticity and psychological well-being, and to examine the effects of creating and interpreting mandalas on the levels of authenticity and psychological well-being of college...
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Succeeding in School: The Online Reflections of Native American and Other Minority Students
This phenomenological study of students' online responses to the Succeeding in School program offers rare insight into how Native American and other minority students perceived and experienced their school environment. Students' strategies regarding...
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