Policy Review

A bimonthly journal of the Hoover Institution that promotes inquiry into the American condition, American and other government and political and economic systems, and the role of the United States in the world. For the academic audience.

Articles from No. 84, July-August

20 Years of Policy Review
Williams on Minimum Wage The racial effect of the minimum wage law would exist in the absence of racial preferences on the behalf of employers. The minimum wage law gives firms effective economic incentive to seek to hire only the most productive employees...
Dividends of Deregulation
Washington, D.C., in the mid-1970s must have felt like heaven on earth to fed- eral regulators and those who favor government control over the nation's eco- nomic activity. From 1970 to 1975, federal spending on regulation grew by 77 percent (in inflation-adjusted...
Jailhouse Rock of Ages
When it comes to fighting crime, liberals and conservatives alike seem to be shadowboxing--dodging the most fateful aspect of criminal justice, the religious dimension. Liberals want more money for rehabilitation programs, which often amount to nothing...
Modern Tomes
A number of years ago, the writers Malcolm Cowley and Bernard Smith invited a group of American intellectuals to identify the nonfiction books of recent decades that had most impressed them and had to some extent influenced their thinking. The result...
Mugged by Reality
In the 30 years since Congress first established a federal agency for the study of crime, we have spent millions of dollars on criminological studies. That investment is finally bearing fruit. Aided by powerful new computers crunching reams of data,...
One Cloud, Fifty Silver Linings
Are you better off now than you were 20 years ago? This is the question con- servatives ought to be asking instead of second-guessing Republican strategy in last year's presidential race or grumbling over the incredible shrinking tax cuts in the federal...
Pilgrims' Progress
The scene certainly looked like a triumphant celebration of national power by religious conservatives. Two months before the 1994 elections, a procession of leading Republicans arrived at the ballroom of the Washington Hilton to preen, wink, and troll...
Reagan Betrayed: Are Conservatives Fumbling His Legacy?
What can conservatives today learn most from Ronald Reagan? Which features of Reagan's legacy (his principles, his rhetoric, his policies, his leadership style) are conservatives today most in danger of forgetting or betraying? Policy Review asked these...
The New Social Architects
Millard Fuller Habitat for Humanity Here's a charity that scorns the concept of the handout in no uncertain terms. In fact, about the only thing they hand you at Habitat for Humanity is a ham- mer and a carpenter's belt. If you want a home for your...
The Pursuit of Unhappiness
Rip Van Winkle arose this spring from a slumber of two decades. He gazed in amazement at a world transformed. The Soviet empire, so menacing when he fell asleep in 1977, was now on the ash heap of history. Rising protectionism had given way to exploding...
You've Come a Long Way, Daddy
The greatest social tragedy of the last 30 years has been the collapse of fatherhood. Propelled by the twin engines of divorce and illegitimacy, the percentage of children growing up in a home without their father nearly tripled between 1960 and the...