Policy Review

A bimonthly journal of the Hoover Institution that promotes inquiry into the American condition, American and other government and political and economic systems, and the role of the United States in the world. For the academic audience.

Articles from No. 62, Fall

America's Queen of Torts: The Long Arm of Texas Law
All across America people trying to do business are being victimized by frivolous lawsuits and civil judgments that have no relation to elementary principles of justice. President Bush has pledged to make reform of the legal system one of his principal...
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Awakening Dragon: The Real Danger in Asia Is Coming from China
Since Napoleon, Westerners have been predicting that once the Chinese dragon awoke, the world would shake. Finally, after almost a century of false starts, China seems firmly embarked on a course of explosive economic growth and military assertiveness...
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Battler for the Republic: Irving Kristol's Terrible Swift Pen
For more than four decades, Irving Kristol has been one of the most important figures in American social and political thought. As co-editor of Encounter and a writer for Commentary in the 1950s, Kristol was one of the principal shapers of the liberal...
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Beyond the Water's Edge: Foreign Policy as an Election Issue
In almost every presidential election since World War II, differences between the two parties on major foreign-policy issues have played an important, if not decisive, role in determining the outcome. But through much of this year's campaign, most...
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Deliver Us from Evil: Prison Fellowship's Saving Grace
In 1812 Francis Howard Greenway was convicted of forgery and sentenced by a British court to 14 years in the penal colony of Australia. Within months of his arrival, Greenway was hired by the governor of Australia as a civil architect. Four years...
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Domestic Storm: Bush's New Tax Promise, and What He Must Do to Keep It
Dr. Samuel Johnson said that second marriages represent the triumph of hope over experience. President George Bush has a fighting chance to win a second term if he can convince the American people that this time he really will keep his promise on...
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Flower Power: Rising Carbon Dioxide Is Great for Plants
One of the best-kept secrets in the global warming debate is that the plant life of Planet Earth would benefit greatly from a higher level of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. You read that correctly. Flowers, trees, and food crops love...
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Hello Columbus: America Was No Paradise in 1492
Columbus's first voyage to the New World was arguably the single most important event in the emergence of our modern sense that we are all together living on one planet. Yet, as we mark its 500th anniversary, the traditional hero-worship of the...
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Let Congress Be Congress: An Agenda for Legislative Reform
Everyone agrees that Congress needs to be reformed. Around 150 new representatives, a third of the House, are likely to be swept into office this November on the reform wave. Many are running explicitly on reform platforms. Even the incumbents have...
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Sooner Than You Think: The Coming Bankruptcy of Social Security
If you are 42 years old today and expect to begin receiving Social Security benefits at age 66, your "normal retirement age" under present law, you may be in for a surprise. Contrary to assertions by the board of trustees of the Social Security...
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The Great Potomac Earthquake: America's New Bargain with Washington
The 1992 presidential race was supposed to be a yawn. George Bush, loftily hovering above 80-percent popularity last year, was supposed to have reelection sewn up. The real action, pundits told us, must wait for 1996's free-for-all. This isn't,...
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To Die in Sarajevo: US Interests in Yugoslavia
What interests does the United States have in the conflict in what was once Yugoslavia? And how should the United States intervene in this conflict, if at all, to protect these interests? Policy Review asked these questions of several leading conservative...
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Tractor-Seat Common Sense: Representative Charles W. Stenholm on the Rise of the Centrist Democrats
For the first time since the early 1980s, a large number of Democrats in the House of Representatives are identifying themselves as moderates and conservatives. These Democrats frequently side with the Republicans on military and defense issues,...
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Why Johnny Can't Work: The Causes of Unemployment
Whenever high unemployment persists for several years, it is because the costs of labor are rising more rapidly than its productivity. This was true in the 1930s, when the labor policies of Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt helped turn a temporary...
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Women of Valor: Why Israel Doesn't Send Women into Combat
The experience of Israel is often used to support the case for sending American women into combat. Israel, after all, has a reputation for military strength; if women have proved to be useful in combat there, it surely reinforces the argument for...
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Yeltsin's Global Shield: Russia Recasts the SDI Debate
In January 1992 Russian President Boris Yeltsin completely rewrote the terms of debate over the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) by proposing a "Global Protection System" to defend against limited missile strikes. Yeltsin's proposal, which has...
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