Policy Review

A bimonthly journal of the Hoover Institution that promotes inquiry into the American condition, American and other government and political and economic systems, and the role of the United States in the world. For the academic audience.

Articles from No. 87, January-February

America's Struggle for Racial Equality
On June 11, 1963, in the wake of Governor George WallaceAEs stand against integration at the University of Alabama, President John F. Kennedy reported to the American people on the state of civil rights in the nation. He called on Congress to pass legislation...
Charity Tax Credits - and Debits: As Welfare Wanes, Conservatives Clash over Whether Government Should Subsidize Private Giving
Welfare reform, by shattering the notion of government-funded dependency, represents one of conservatismAEs great victories in recent years. It also presents one of the movementAEs toughest challenges: If government is not to be the safety net of first...
Duty, Honor, Country: Molding Citizen-Soldiers
Sylvanus Thayer, the superintendent of West Point from 1817 to 1833, was not the U.S. Military AcademyAEs first chief, but he so thoroughly reorganized it and instilled in it a spirit of discipline and excellence that he became known as the "Father of...
Making Criminals Pay: A New York County's Bold Experiment in Biblical Justice
After a few drinks, you could count on Joseph Minotti to climb into his car and become a highway menace. For the better part of a decade, Minotti routinely drove in Genesee County, New York, while under the influence of alcohol. Six times he was arrested...
Mo Excuses: Houston Educator Thaddeus Lott Puts Failing Schools to Shame
Gayle Fallon wanted to give her 10-year-old godson a measure of stability in life. With a father who had compiled a long record of felony convictions and a mother imprisoned for shoplifting after two prior convictions for drug possession, the boy had...
Oregon's Revolt against Social Security
The conventional wisdom holds that nothing scares Washington politicians so much as the subject of Social Security reform, the so-called third rail of American politics: "Touch it and you die." While Washington politicians cringe, however, rising grass-roots...
The Family Benefits of the PC Revolution
One night a couple of years ago, Madeline SheaAEs infant son woke up crying. Congested and cranky, he gave Shea a scare, and left her in a quandary. It was 3 a.m. Should she take him to the emergency room? Should she wake up her family doctor? Should...
The Shocking Success of Welfare Reform
Near the end of Losing Ground, his seminal 1984 book on poverty and welfare policy, Charles Murray lamented that "the political systemAEs tolerance for [welfare] reform is extremely limited. . . . The number of aepolitically feasibleAE changes that would...
Virginia's Free-Market Environmentalist
In environmental circles, mere mention of Becky Norton Dunlop's name always gets a strong reaction. "She's in with the far Right," says Daniel Barry of the Environmental Working Group. The Washington Post says that Virginia's top official for environmental...