Policy Review

A bimonthly journal of the Hoover Institution that promotes inquiry into the American condition, American and other government and political and economic systems, and the role of the United States in the world. For the academic audience.

Articles from No. 70, Fall

Delta Force: Conservatism's Best Young Economists
The creeping rot of multiculturalism, feminism, deconstructionism, and other fashionably radical intellectual trends has spread to nearly every branch of study in American universities. But economics appears to have developed an immunity to such diseases....
Don't Stand So Close to Me: Judges Are Giving Neighborhoods a Bum Rap
For years Richard Kreimer was a regular at the Morristown, New Jersey public library. Dressed in soiled and sweat-soaked clothes, the homeless man spent his days stalking, staring down, and speaking loudly and belligerently to library staff and patrons....
Immigration or the Welfare State
Immigration has recently become a lightning rod for America's deepest fears of social chaos and national decline. Millions worry that immigration is rapidly transforming America into a third-world country, with crowded, violent cities, under-educated...
Reel Politik: Great Conservative Cinema
Few institutions exert more influence over American popular culture than the wildly successful Hollywood dream factory. At the same time, many fret over the collapsing moral standards in our culture and accuse the film industry of being a relentless...
Riddles, Mysteries, and Enigmas: Unanswered Questions of Communism's Collapse
The end of the Cold War and the fall of the Soviet Union are surely the most important events in world history since the conclusion of the Second World War. Yet we still have only a very incomplete understanding of how this outcome came about and why....
Rivers of Babylon: A Harvard Man Brings the Gospel to the Crack House
Eugene F. Rivers III is a lot of things, but timid isn't one of them. "Thirty years after passage of the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts, more black people are incarcerated in domestic death camps than in the time of Jim Crow," he says. "We have...
Russia's Spiritual Wilderness: Freedom Cannot Take Root without Moral Renewal
Three years after the exhilarating collapse of centralized Communism, Russia still has a long way to go before it will be a free and democratic country. Even optimists claim the country borders on the ungovernable. Democratic reformers are paralyzed...
The Dog That Didn't Bark: Who Put the Muzzle on Congressional Reform?
Disgusted by twin scandals at the House Bank and Post Office, voters in 1992 sent a clear message to Washington: The American people wanted sweeping congressional reform. The signs of voter discontent were unmistakable. Dozens of incumbents fell...
Thy Brother's Keeper: The Mutual Aid Tradition of American Fraternal Orders
With the collapse of the Clinton health plan, Americans can go back to the drawing board in finding a way to provide low-cost health insurance to the working poor. It is not necessary to raise taxes, levy price controls, impose employer mandates, or...
Voice of America: Why Liberals Fear Me
There are times in one's life that despite all the blood, toil, tears, and sweat expended in the pursuit of excellence, one really should lean back, light up a good cigar, take a sip of an adult beverage, and just savor the moment. My friends, this...
Yes We Kenosha: With Can-Do Capitalism, a Wisconsin Town Busts out of the Rustbelt
Early in 1988 Kenosha, Wisconsin became the symbol for the media of all that is supposedly wrong with American capitalism. In January that year, the Chrysler Corporation announced that two days before Christmas, it would close the nation's oldest car...
You Just Can't Take It Anymore: America's Property Rights Revolt
Outraged citizens staged a grass-roots tax revolt in the late 1970s that forced lawmakers to cut taxes, reversed the prevailing orthodoxy about taxes in intellectual circles, elected dozens of state and federal anti-tax lawmakers, and helped catapult...