Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 2, Summer

A Better Path. (Letters to the Editor)
It was pleasing to find such a well informed and precise article on the interactions between US policy and Peruvian drug politics (Alex Stone, "A Wayward Path," Winter 2002). Apart from a few mistakes (Peru's illiteracy rate is far below 80 percent:...
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Building North America: Diversity and Community. (End Paper)
There is a "Europe." The European Union is an entity through which 15 states now share elements of sovereignty. A European identity is being forged, most powerfully expressed by a common currency. No analogous identity exists in North America. It...
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Chain Reaction: How the Subcontinent Went Nuclear. (World in Review)
Although events such as the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis sparked global fear of nuclear war, careful diplomacy between the United States and the Soviet Union led to the emergence of a stable nuclear balance. The 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty...
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Cinema and War: Hollywood's Response to September 11. (Interview)
After serving as a pilot in the US Army Air Corps in World War II, jack Valenti co founded the advertising/political consulting agency of Weekley &Valenti in 1952. Eleven years later he became a special assistant to US President Lyndon Johnson...
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Deepening Russian Democracy: Progress and Pitfalls in Putin's Government. (Democracy)
In December 1991, the Soviet Union ceased to exist. In its place, a newly independent Russian democracy was born, alongside 14 other republics. The 10th anniversary of that momentous event provides a fitting occasion to pause and take stock, to...
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Dictatorships of Virtue? States, NGOs, and the Imposition of Democratic Values. (Democracy)
With the Cold War now an almost fond memory of a good cause won, democracy should be secure in the world. Almost no political ideology opposes it. Even states in what US President George Bush dubbed the "axis of evil" call themselves republics,...
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Disconnected Continent: The Difficulties of the Internet in Africa. (World in Review)
While the Internet has become an integral part of the Western world, it has only just arrived in Africa. In the United States and northern Europe, an average of one out of three people uses the Internet. In Africa, as in much of the developing world,...
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Emerald Trials: Northern Ireland's Struggle for Peace. (World in Review)
A politically and socially violent landscape has long been an undeniable presence in Northern Ireland. For the younger generation, it has been a fact of life since birth. The start of "the Troubles" in Ireland can be dated back to 1968, although...
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Illiberal Democracy Five Years Later: Democracy's Fate in the 21st Century. (Democracy)
HARVARD INTERNATIONAL REVIEW: In your seminal piece in Foreign Affairs, you described the dichotomy between the spread of liberal constitutionalism and democratization. How has the experience of the last few years changed your interpretation...
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Inside the Pandemic: African Perspectives on the AIDS Crisis. (Review Essays)
HIV/AIDS has become "the most devastating disease humankind has ever faced," according to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Since the epidemic began 21 years ago, over 60 million people worldwide have contracted the virus....
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Jiang's Sins: A Xinjiang Petro-Spective. (Global Notebook)
The northwest China skyline emits a peculiar glow. It is the flames of giant oil refineries, whose heat is matched only by the level of local resentment toward the presence of the Chinese government. This region, known as Xinjiang and largely...
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Knocked off Axis? Iranian Reform Challenged. (Global Notebook)
In recent years, the reform minded elements within Iranian politics, led by President Mohammed Khatami, have repeatedly clashed with more conservative interests. This gives hope for improvements within the Iranian social system and better foreign...
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Making Democratization Work: Overcoming the Challenges of Political Transitions. (Democracy)
Over the last 15 years, the world has seen the emergence of nearly 60 new democratically elected governments. While in 1987 there were 69 electoral democracies among the world's 167 independent states, today there are 121, an increase of 52 democracies...
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Neglected No Longer: Strategic Rivalry in the Indian Ocean. (Perspectives)
After roughly a decade in the strategic wilderness, the Indian Ocean region is again becoming an arena of geopolitical rivalry among world powers and local states. During the final decades of the Cold War, the region was a zone of fairly intense...
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No End in Sight: South Africa's Endless Woes. (Global Notebook)
In 1990, after the fall of the apartheid system, the future appeared bright: for South African citizens: Nelson Mandela was released from prison, the white minority rule was overthrown, and democracy prevailed. As South Africa continued its transformation,...
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Not Yet (E)United: Cyprus and Accession. (Global Notebook)
The Republic of Cyprus, an island nation in the Mediterranean long split between Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot governmental factions, now faces the prospect of admission into the European Union. This possibility has renewed hopes of forging...
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Orchestrating Foreign Policy: US Interagency Decisions Post-September 11. (Perspectives)
The terrorist attacks of September 11 provided the US government with a rallying point around which a coherent worldview and agenda for international engagement could coalesce. Since that time, the public has faced a flood of analysis and commentary...
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Past Successes, Present Challenges: Latin American Politics at the Crossroads. (Democracy)
As it enters the 21st century, Latin America is marked by the co-existence of democratic regimes alongside a range of deeply disturbing political and socio-economic factors, from rampant corruption and widespread violence to wrenching inequalities....
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Real-Time Responsibility: Journalism's Challenges in an Instantaneous Age. (Perspectives)
In the weeks following September 11, US "reality TV" shows, from Survivor to Temptation Island, took a dive in the ratings. This was hardly surprising when 24-hour cable news stations and major networks were broadcasting uninterrupted coverage of...
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The Many Faces of Africa: Democracy across a Varied Continent. (Democracy)
A decade ago, seasoned observers of African politics including Larry Diamond and Richard Joseph argued that the continent was on the cusp of its "second liberation." Rising popular demand for political reform across Africa, multiparty elections,...
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The New Generation: Democracy in Theory and Practice. (Editor's Note)
There is a temptation to think that democracy has triumphed as the world's dominant governmental paradigm. In one sense this is undoubtedly true. The world's strongest and most stable nations tend to be democratic, and the influence of their practices...
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Trial and Tribulation: Extraditing Accused Terrorists. (Global Notebook)
In a modern world where crimes are international, extradition is an issue of growing importance. After the September 11 terrorist attacks, the problems with extradition have become increasingly clear. The United States' decision to try accused...
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UN-Paid Dues: The Costs of Cooperation. (Global Notebook)
On September 24, 2001, only 13 days after the tragic events in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania, the US House of Representatives approved a US$582 million payment in back dues to the United Nations. Despite a history of squabbling and heated...
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