Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 1, Spring

And Justice for All?: The New Era of International Law. (Editor's Note)
International law is the object of both great hope and great fear. In an era of unprecedented globalization, international legal institutions serve as vehicles for the facilitation of commerce and cooperation among nations. And in the last year, after...
Another Hundred Years of Solitude?: Latin America after September 11. (End Paper)
Latin America may become an unintended casualty of September 11. Before the terrorist attacks, US policy-makers were warming toward their hemispheric neighbors. The meeting between US President George W. Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox brought...
Asian Invasion: Baseball's Ambassadors. (Global Notebook)
The 2001 US Major League Base ball (MLB) season heralded greater prominence for a relatively new presence in the American national pastime--that of Asian baseball players. Ichiro Suzuki--better known as "Ichiro"--after dominating Japanese pitchers...
Asylum for All: Refugee Protection in the 21st Century. (International Law)
The horrific September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States have wrought serious collateral damage on an unexpected target: global attitudes towards refugees and asylum-seekers. Since the attacks, some countries have curtailed their refugee-resettlement...
Bad Hair Day: Koizumi's Struggle in Japan. (Global Notebook)
When Junichiro Koizumi became prime minister of Japan in April 2001, he had an approval rating of nearly 90 percent. Elected to office without the full support of his Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), Koizumi was acclaimed by junior legislators as...
Bittersweet Harvest: The Debate over Genetically Modified Crops. (World in Review)
In 1982 scientists on the 4th floor of the Monsanto Company U Building successfully introduced a foreign gene into a plant cell for the first time in history. These plants were genetically modified: they continued to express the new gene while exhibiting...
Chechen Chagrin: Human Rights in Chechnya. (Global Notebook)
Since October 1999, Chechnya has seen intense conflict between residents and occupying Russian forces. Grievous abuses of human rights have been reported, including extrajudicial executions, torture, and arbitrary arrests. However, Russia has been...
Collateral Damage: Sacrificing Legitimacy in the Search for Justice. (International Law)
While the world mourned in the immediate aftermath of the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, an international legal response was sculpted in the corridors of the UN Security Council, NATO, and the US Congress. This response...
Food for Thought: Intellectual Property Rights, Food, and Biodiversity. (International Law)
Conflict over property--such as land, gold, or oil--is nothing new. But today an in tangible kind of property invented in the legal system of the Western world is becoming as valuable and contested as the tangible property of old. Intellectual property...
Learning Curve: The United States and the Future of Pakistan. (World in Review)
Since the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington last fall, coalition building has become the new catchphrase in foreign policy. Forming close relationships with Muslim countries is essential for success in the war on terrorism, and thus the...
On the Horizon: The Dawn of a New Sino-Japanese Rivalry. (Perspectives)
Asia first glimpsed its future in 1997 when Japan and the United States renegotiated their long-standing defense arrangements and China tried to sway Taiwan's elections by lobbing missiles into the Taiwan Strait. As the US Pacific fleet positioned...
Pakistan's Dilemma: Breaking Links with the Past. (Perspectives)
The unspeakable sequence of terrorism in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington, DC on September 11, 2001, was a crime against humanity that sent a wave of revulsion throughout the civilized world--a world that will never be the same again. The lives...
Passing the Cup: The Meaning of the America's Cup at the Global Table. (World in Review)
The oldest sporting trophy in the world, the America's Cup, celebrated its sesquicentennial this past August in the Isle of Wight, where it was first wrested from the hands of the British by the ship America in 1851. Royalty and business tycoons joined...
Raising the Bar: Human-Rights Initiatives in Taiwan. (Perspectives)
In the March 2000 election, the Republic of China (ROC) crossed a crucial threshold. With my election as president, Taiwan experienced the first-ever party rotation in its history. In my inauguration address in May, I proposed a number of human-rights...
Refugees or Migrants?: The Roma of Eastern Europe. (Global Notebook)
When Czech national television ran a story on the leniency of British asylum laws in 1997, hundreds of Gypsies entered Britain asking for recognition of refugee status. By claiming ethnic oppression in their countries of origin, they brought the...
Reporting the World: Challenges for US Media. (Interview)
Rick Kaplan was president of CNN-US from 1997 to 2000. During that time, he was responsible for all of CNN's news programming, and under his guidance, CNN made strides in its analysis and coverage of both breaking and ongoing stories. Prior to joining...
The Future of Law: Protecting the Rights of Civilians. (International Law)
Throughout world history, the principal threat to international peace and security has been "war"--the threat that the League of Nations, the Kellogg-Briand Pact, and the United Nations sought, but failed, to prevent. Traditionally, war has been declared...
The Oils of War: Conflict in the Sudan. (Global Notebook)
Civil conflict in Sudan has raged for 34 out of the past 45 years. It has been responsible for over two million casualties and has displaced over four million people in the last 17 years alone. With no attention from major news organizations, the...
Trial by Fury?: The Fallacy of Bush's Military Tribunals. (International Law)
The immediate and rightful response of the United States to the atrocity of September 11 was to demand "justice," although that word sounded in many powerful mouths like a lynch mob's cry for summary execution, assassination squads, and Osama bin Laden...
Tuvalu Little, Tuvalu Late: A Country Goes under. (Global Notebook)
Most people are unaware of the existence of the small nation of Tuvalu, a nine-island archipelago in the South Pacific 1000 km north of Fiji and 4000 km east of Australia. Given its minuscule size and remote location, this is hardly surprising. ...
War on Terrorism: Leadership before Multilateralism. (Letters to the Editor)
In the aftermath of September 11, many highly contrived, though well-intentioned, articles have appeared in various journals. Sabeel Rahman's article ("Another New World Order? Multilateralism in the Aftermath of September 11," HIR, Winter 2002), in...