Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 3, Fall

Beneficial War: The Conceit of US Counterinsurgency
In 1925, crusader for American airpower Brigadier General William Mitchell argued that using an independent US air force to attack an enemy nation's industrial and economic works would benefit not only the United States but also the enemy nation. The...
Big Brother Politics: The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt
As Egypt moves from the euphoria of revolution to the less heady questions of timetables, candidates, and elections, the Arab world's oldest and dominant Islamist organization, the Muslim Brotherhood, is again stepping into die Egyptian political and...
Cholera Vaccination in Haiti: Evidence, Ethics, Expedience
The cholera epidemic in Haiti will be a year old in October and is far from under control. As cases spiked across the country during the summer rainy season, the ranks of cholera relief workers grew thin. Too few patients reach healthcare facilities...
Contending with Conflict: Managing Crime in Central America
Central America is now recognized as the most violent area in the world--more so than war zones such as Iraq and Afghanistan. Murder rates in all Central American nations except Costa Rica exceed 10 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants, the World Health...
Development in Pakistan: Perspectives on the Financial Future
AN INTERVIEW WITH ABDUL HAFEEZ SHAIKH [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ABDUL HAFEEZ SHAIKH is an economist of international repute with over 30 years of experience in policymaking, management, and implementation. He has served as Minister for Finance,...
Family & Globalization
In In her article "An Emerging Global Market," Sassen highlights both the growing segmentation of specialized labor markets and the increasing importance of employing local professionals as key changes in the parameters of the global labor market....
From Seoul to Cannes: What Has the G20 Delivered So Far?
The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the views and politics of the Bank. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] As the Sherpa of the Republic of Korea, I found one of the most rewarding outcomes of the Seoul Summit was that it delivered...
Instruments of Peace: The Use of Health for National Security
As the hunt For Osama bin Laden began to focus on the now infamous compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, the CIA desperately sought confirmation that he was there. The agency came up with an idea: hire a local doctor to conduct a fake vaccination campaign,...
Letter from the Editors
Disease knows no borders, and in an international law system built on principles of sovereignty, this transnational threat poses new and often scary questions about the future of health politics. With health gains also representing a universal goal,...
Mirage or Reality? the Malaysian Reformation
With a harsh legal system that is hostile to governmental opposition, Malaysia is known as one of Asia's most politically conservative countries. However, it may soon retire from this position of dubious honor, given Prime Minister Najib Razak's recently...
Potential for Progress: Opportunities for Economic Growth in Bangladesh
Precarious topography, political turmoil, and a Struggling global economy are tough conditions for any state, let alone a young democracy of 140 million citizens. In light of these problems, Bangladesh's sustained economic growth becomes all the more...
Pressing for Change: Russia's 2012 Presidential Election
On September 24, Russian president Dmitri Medvedev announced that he would step aside for his mentor and current Prime Minister Vladimir Putin to reclaim the presidency in 2012. Since he first took over the presidency in 2000 from Boris Yeltsin, Vladimir...
Russia Rising: Moscow's Quiet Resurgence
When a calamitous earthquake and tsunami struck the east coast of Japan in March 2011, few could have guessed just how far the aftershock would reach. Japan, one of the world's largest economies and a powerhouse in East Asia, was left utterly devastated...
The American Enterprise Institute Presents ... Free Trade Foreign Policy; How Trade Myths Impede a Key US Policy Tool
For at least tour years, bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) have been a battleground over which US trade skeptics and trade proponents have skirmished. While three such agreements--with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama--were condemned to a policy...
The Brookings Institution Presents ... Trade and Climate Change: A Mutually Supportive Policy
There are several links between trade and climate change, but in most cases these connections have been viewed as being in tension or in conflict. For example, there is concern that domestic climate change policies promoting renewable energy may be...
The Chavez Paradox: Assessing the Bolivarian Revolution
In June, the president of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, traveled to Cuba for emergency surgery. A month later, the announcement that he was undergoing cancer treatment threw the apparent hegemony of his revolution into disarray...
The Chilean Way: A Look at Social Democracy in the 21st Century
Over the past 20 years, Chile has established a successful social democracy in which public policies complement and temper market forces. Economic growth and targeted social policies have led to a major reduction in poverty, while other reforms have...
The Impact of Change: Shifting Global Architecture and HIV
AIDS has now been with us for a quarter of a century, and there are people still alive who were among the first people to be diagnosed with HTV after the retrovirus was discovered and named in 1983. Think back to the world of that time: Ronald Reagan...
The Triple Burden: Disease in Developing Nations
The world is currently going through one of the most radical health transformations in history. During the past few years, health has ceased being the exclusive concern of domain experts and specialized agencies. Interconnected with national security,...
Trading Up: Nigeria's Infrastructure Fix
During its half-century since independence, Nigeria has gained a reputation for inefficient use of its natural resources and a weak government system of patronage and high corruption. However, with the democratic election of previously de-facto President...
Understanding Exploitation
Siddartha Kara writes a splendidly persuasive piece of activist-journalism, using his deeply personal experiences trawling the brothels and factories of distant lands to extrapolate global truths about contemporary forms of slavery. Kara's outrage...