Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 4, Spring

After Apollo: The American West in Devising a New Space Policy
Just over 200 years ago an American president I initiated a program of exploration that sent I two men to the Pacific Ocean. Fifty years ago, I another American president initiated a program I of exploration that sent two men to the Sea of tranquility....
Read preview Overview
A Sequential Strategy
In their article, "The Triple Burden: Disease in Developing Nations," Frenk and Gomez-Dantes identify the largest health challenges facing low-and middle-income countries: infection, undernutrition and maternal mortality; non-communicable diseases...
Read preview Overview
At Home and Abroad: Restoring American Political Exceptionaliam
The United States' preeminent position as the leading democracy in the world is threatened today by a breakdown in our politics that can be traced back to the 2000 election and the policy failures that occurred in the wake of the terrorist attacks...
Read preview Overview
Cleaning Up Space: The Development of International Space Debris Policies
In an unheralded action in December 2007, the United Nations General Assembly endorsed a comprehensive set of space debris mitigation guidelines, which had been adopted just six months earlier by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS)....
Read preview Overview
Commercialization in Space: Changing Boundaries and Future Promises
The concept of private enterprise exploiting space to build and grow thriving business ventures is nothing new. It has been around since 1965. That's when the first: commercial satellite, called Early Bird, went into regular revenue service with 240...
Read preview Overview
Cyberwar: The Future of Conflict
In the past six months, hackers have infiltrated the websites and internal servers of the United States Senate, the CIA, numerous other state and federal agencies, private corporations, and individuals. The onslaught seems unstoppable, and the FBI...
Read preview Overview
Delving Deeper
The Harvard International Review is to be commended for interviewing Pakistan's Finance Minister, as the country's economical and societal issues are generally under-reported in the media. However, non-specific questions, and statements of the Minister...
Read preview Overview
Democracy on the Horizon: How the Arab Spring Is Unfolding in Jordan
The Arab Spring has engulfed the Middle East, and Jordan is no exception. Since January last year, protests have gripped a country less known for trouble than its neighbors. Although Jordan shares many grievances with Tunisia and Egypt, its political...
Read preview Overview
Durban Dilemma: A Second Green Revolution?
In 1992, 172 governments participated in the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, producing the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The international environmental treaty, while not itself setting any...
Read preview Overview
Governing Asia's Financial Hub: Reflections of Outgoing Hong Kong Chief Executive
Hong Kong's vibrant economy has avoided recession amidst the global financial crisis, but the effects of the worsening European sovereign debt crisis are starting to show. How is Hong Kong's economy being affected? How should the government respond?...
Read preview Overview
Growing Solutions: Agriculture's Changing Reputation
At the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition's annual conference in Milan, Italy last month, nutrition, food, and agriculture experts from around the world gathered to discuss how to x the world's broken food system. Guido Barilla, President of the...
Read preview Overview
Leadership by Default: The United States and the Final Frontier
The United States' leadership in space is a natural result of its high standing among the world's democracies and its vast wealth, which enables it to spend more than US$35 billion annually on civil and national security space activity, far surpassing...
Read preview Overview
Letter from the Editors
In October 1957, the USSR launched the Sputnik satellite into orbit and captured the imagination and fear of a generation. Fifty-five years of spaceflight later, an ever-increasing array of countries is scrambling for presence in space, an envelope...
Read preview Overview
Lights Out: A Struggle for Power in Pakistan
In a time of extreme volatility in Pakistan, it is difficult to find stability in even simple, everyday activities such as flipping a light switch. For years now, Pakistan has been dealing with an electricity shortage that is discouraging the industrial...
Read preview Overview
Looking Locally
In "Beneficial War" from the previous issue, US Army Colonel Gian Gentile argued that counterinsurgency (COIN), the military doctrine for American efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan by which American forces work to build security and governance in occupied...
Read preview Overview
Managing Space: International Space Law and Prospective Reforms
In 1964, Arthur C. Clarke perceptively noted that "one day, we may have brain surgeons in Edinburgh operating on patients in New Zealand. When that time comes, the whole world would've shrunk to a point and the traditional role of the city as a meeting...
Read preview Overview
Myanmar at a Crossroads: Thant Myint-U's Where China Meets India
Draw a circle, instructs Thant Myint-U in his recent book Where China Meets India, around Myanmar's second largest city, Mandalay. Give it a radius of 700 miles, roughly the distance from Washington DC to Chicago. Within this circle lives ten percent...
Read preview Overview
Occupy Wall Street: A Protest against a Broken Economic Compact
During the early months when Occupy Wall Street maintained tent cities in lower Manhattan and other metropolitan areas around the country, the occupations attracted an array of young counter-eulturalists and itinerant radicals. To many people seeing...
Read preview Overview
River Rivalries: The Politicization of Water in Asia
Lurking beneath the mosaic of geopolitical tensions in Asia is a wellspring of conflict over one of humanity's most fundamental needs: water. For the 1.3 billion people living in southwest China and the northern reaches of Southeast Asia, rivers are...
Read preview Overview
Strengthening Space Security: Advancing US Interests in Outer Space
Fifty years ago, the Space Age was not yet five years old hut the broad outlines of US space interests were visible. The year 1962 saw the first US human orbital flight by John Glenn on a converted Atlas Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM). Telstar...
Read preview Overview
Success despite Injustice: Social Benefit from the Afghan Woman's Resilience
The world often views Afghan women and girls as passive victims to be pitied, oppressed by religion, traditional Afghan culture, and the Taliban until the United States and their international allies liberated them after the invasion in 2001. This...
Read preview Overview
The Aborted Revolution: The Demise of Bahrain's Democracy Movement
When US Defense Secretary Robert Gates arrived in Manama on March 12th, 2011, Pearl Roundabout was teeming with protestors. The Roundabout--an open area defined by the towering Pearl Monument, which honored Bahrain's history as an independent pearling...
Read preview Overview
The World Is Flat: Outsourcing the Eurozone Crisis
With every passing week, the state of the Eurozone crisis grows more and more desperate. Recent discussions converged on the establishment of a three-pronged attack on the debt crisis: the acceptance of a fifty percent loss by banks holding Greek debt,...
Read preview Overview
Unlocking Central Asia: Fostering the Growth of a Region in Transition
Amply endowed with natural resources but handicapped by its landlocked situation, Central Asia has experienced unparalleled growth rates over the past ten years. The exploitation of" these resources and the investments that have been made, often with...
Read preview Overview
Volatility to Global Cooperation: Insights into Current Economic Challenges
In your opinion, what are the most pressing concerns facing the OECD today? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The global crisis, the financial crisis and now the employment crisis of advanced economies, all affect the members of the OECD. We must help these...
Read preview Overview