Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1, Spring

A CIVIC Project: Helping Innocent Victims of War in Iraq and Afghanistan
After witnessing the effects of war in Afghanistan and Iraq, you founded the Campaign for Innocent Victims in Conflict (CIVIC). What is CIVIC's current mission, and does it have long-term ambitions? I work with victims of conflict. We do everything...
A New Silk Road: The Future of US-Kazakh Relations
Historically, the United States has had a difficult time currying favor with Central Asian countries for political, religious, and cultural reasons. However, since 2001, events like the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and the crumbling roadmap in the...
Barely Borders: Issues of International Law
Was the US-led attack on Iraq justified? The question comes from all corners of the globe, and answers are varied. Our collective response should be to cooperate in thoughtfully examining the practical constraints and legal limits to military intervention....
Behind Closed Doors: Governmental Transparency Gives Way to Secrecy
A few years ago, I sat at a table in a Washington think-tank with a group of mid-level Japanese officials. They were spending several weeks in the United States on a study tour, and I was meeting with them to give a talk on governance and access to...
Corporate Leadership
In his article ("Breach of Trust: Leadership in a Market Economy," Fall 2003), Roger Leeds regurgitates facts surrounding the problem of corporate governance with US corporations. Leeds fails to bring any new viewpoint or insight into the issue, repeating...
Dealing Drugs: North Korean Narcotics Trafficking
The 1990s was not a good decade for North Korea, especially by economic standards. The period began with the collapse of the USSR, a primary trading partner, and ended with the loss of trade with China, causing North Korea's economic output to fall...
Doctrinal Divisions: The Politics of US Military Interventions
In recent times, the United States has entered a particularly active phase in its use of military force. Since 1989, the United States has intervened in Panama, Kuwait, northern Iraq, Somalia, Bosnia, Haiti, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. And, with...
Globalization: Passing Fad or Permanent Revolution?
Globalization is now often dismissed as another over-hyped fad of the 1990s. Like Internet companies or market reforms in poor countries, globalization promised much and delivered little. After all, the argument goes, aren't terrorism, US unilateralism,...
Humanitarian Hazard: Revisiting Doctrines of Intervention
No foreign policy seems more inherently benign than humanitarian military intervention. It is rooted in the altruistic desire to protect innocents from violent death. It appears feasible, given the military superiority of Western forces over those...
Islamic Militancy
Henry Munson's article ("Lifting the Veil: Understanding the Roots of Islamic Militancy," Winter 2004) makes a valuable contribution in the study of the development of Islamic militancy. He argues convincingly that US policies in the Arab world are...
Legality to Legitimacy: The Revival of the Just War Framework
As the modern state system evolved during the centuries before the seminal event of the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, international law gradually displaced just war doctrine in providing guidelines for permissible uses of international force. During...
Love Thy Neighbor: Regional Intervention in Sudan's Civil War
The historic peace agreement currently being completed between the government of Sudan and the country's main rebel group, the Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA), will mark the end of a long and bloody chapter of Sudanese history. Negotiated by...
Mass Movement: Indigenous Turmoil in Bolivia
In October 2003, a coalition of mainly indigenous farmers, students, and union members paralyzed Bolivia in what was dubbed "Bloody October." Protestors dynamited bridges, felled telephone poles, and tore roads apart, preventing the delivery of food,...
Phantom Menace: Toledo in Post-Fujimori Peru
Since the collapse of Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori's authoritarian government in November 2000, democratically elected President Alejandro Toledo Manrique has tried to design policies to continue economic growth, provide civil security, and...
Qualifying Kyoto: A Warming Climate and a Heated Debate
Earth is warming, but the international community is getting colder. Political heat is scorching and countries are baring their cold shoulders. As pressure rises and fissures widen, the Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement aimed at significantly...
Roots of Conflict: Felling Palestine's Olive Trees
For centuries the olive branch has been offered as a symbol of unconditional peace, since olive trees take decades to produce fruit and thus can only be cultivated during long periods of stability. Ironically, these symbols of peace are a significant...
Seats Reserved: Political Upheaval in Japan
For nearly 50 years after post-World War II political reform, the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has enjoyed a monopoly over Japanese politics. Despite corruption scandals associated with party leaders and the economic recession of the 1990s, the LDP...
Setting the Standard: Justifying Humanitarian Intervention
Humanitarian intervention was supposed to have gone the way of the 1990s. The use of military force across borders to stop mass killing was seen as a luxury of an era in which national security concerns among the major powers were less pressing and...
Stepping In
Diplomacy may be the art of statesmanship, but intervention is rarely artful. Whereas diplomacy happens comfortably behind tables, intervention often unfolds dangerously on the ground. Surely one of the most intriguing methods of state-to-state interaction,...
The Limits of Neorealism: Marginal States and International Relations Theory
The foreign policy of small states tends to attract little public or scholarly attention. Much of the discussion about the international role of less powerful nations seems to acquire a mocking tone, flippantly dismissing Switzerland's quaint neutrality...
The Other Side of the Coin: Populism, Nationalism, and the European Union
In studying the evolution of the European Union (EU), scholars and politicians alike have focused on its institutional side, or what Jurgen Habermas calls the "postnational constellation." They examine the European Union as a supranational body--its...
The Strategic Triangle: Dynamics between China, Russia, and the United States
The strategic triangle that once dominated world politics during the heyday of the Cold War has lost much of its glamour since the collapse of Soviet power. Nonetheless, Washington continues to keep a watchful eye on what transpires between Russia...
The Table of Peace: The Status of Kurds in Turkey
From the day that the guns fell silent in World War I and the Ottoman Empire collapsed into its constituent components, the question of what to do with minorities within the rump state of Turkey, particularly the Kurds, has been a burning issue. When...
Unfit for a King: Democratic Desires in Swaziland
The recent elections in Swaziland were held under the auspices of King Mswati II's autocratic rule and effectively brought traditional political institutions and the modern democratic state to a crossroads. In a country where the king is supreme, the...
Words of War: Challenges to the Just War Theory
What standards should be met for an intervention to be for "self determination"? Would Kosovo fit under this category? Intervention in secessionist or national liberation struggles is not at all easy to justify. We cannot rule it out: remember that...