Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 1, Spring

A Long Road Ahead: Leveraging Culture in Haiti's Reconstruction an Interview with Michele Pierre-Louis
What progress has been made since January, and where is Haiti now? Haiti is still in an extremly difficult situation because all the millions of people who lost their housing, belongings, and loved ones are still in the street. I'm not sure that...
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An Iranian Bombshell; How Israel Can and Will Respond
Much has been written and argued about what Israel can do to effectively address Iran's nuclear program, which Israel views as a credible existential threat. Most Israelis believe that Iran is determined to acquire nuclear weapons and remain skeptical...
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A President's Report Card: Obama's First Year as President an Interview with Noam Chomsky
You have remarked that you see little substantive difference between the Bush administration's and the Obama administration's foreign policies. How are Obama's policies similar to, or different from, the Bush administration policies? Well, to be...
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A Womanly Virtue; Female Representation as Global Security Strategy
Throughout the more than 30 years that I have been in politics, I have often encountered "glass ceilings," "glass walls," and "sticky floors." These concepts of gender inequalities result from social constructs built upon the numerous stereotypes present...
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Big Tuna: The Philippines' Fishing Woes
Home to six of its country's seven operating fish canneries, General Santos City is dubbed the tuna capital of the Philippines. Each day, around 280 tons of giant tuna are prepared and processed there for worldwide distribution. Within 24 hours of...
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Can Chavez Resurrect? Dark Days for Venezuela's Bolivarian Revolution
Take a look at any wall or sidewalk in Venezuela, and you are certain to sec two images peering back at you--Hugo Chavez and Simon Bolivar. Graffiti, billboards, and posters lining almost every inch of open concrete extol the virtues of both Bolivar--a...
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Caveats to Authority
In his Winter 2010 article "Authoritarianism after 1989: From Regime Types to Transnational Processes," Professor Jason Brownlee incisively points to the transnational character of authoritarianism. Indeed, while the end of the Cold War stimulated...
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Communist Care: Cuba's State-Led Humanitarianism
When a massive 7.0-magnitude earthquake rocked Haiti in January 2010, students from the Latin American School of Medicine (LASM), Cuba's prize medical school, rushed to assist with the relief effort. Less than 24 hours after the earthquake caused untold...
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Gauche Politics: Radical Leftism Resurges in France
Nicolas Sarkozy took office as president of France with a broad agenda of sweeping economic reform. Unlike Britain and the United States, both of which began the process of economic liberalization around 1980, France had largely maintained its post-war...
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Guinea's Golden Boy: Dore's Dangerous Balancing Act
In early February 2010, the military junta in Guinea made the sudden announcement that, it would hand over power to a provisional, civilian government in anticipation of turning the country toward democratic elections this summer. The news came at...
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Leading by Example, Revisited: Can the EU Still Serve as a Model to Lead Global Climate Policy?
The Copenhagen summit has been disastrous for the European Union, the most ambitious player and self-proclaimed leader in international climate policy. Not only did the outcome fall far short of Europe's high expectations, but the European Union also...
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Legislating Hatred: Anti-Gay Sentiment in Uganda
If Stosh Mugisha, a Ugandan lesbian activist, lived in New York or San Francisco, she could march in a gay pride parade. She could find an LGBT support group, a stable job, and go on to live a normal life with her partner. But this is not the case...
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Letter from the Editors
Half a century after the Feminist Revolution began challenging patriarchal structures across all aspects of society, the structures of the political arena obstinately hold out as frequent perpetuators of gender inequality. Ironically, although political...
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Life's a Party; Do Political Parties Help or Hinder Women?
When we think about the scarcity of female politicians, social and cultural explanations usually come to mind. We think about the constraints of traditional gender roles, inequalities in women's socioeconomic status, and the dearth of women candidates....
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Oil Sheik-Down: Saudi Arabia's Struggle to Contain Iran
Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's recent visit to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia culminated in the March 2010 signing of the Riyadh Declaration, through which he and Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulazizal-Saud agreed to a far-reaching expansion of bilateral...
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Structuring Representation: Women's Access to Political Power across the World
On March 9, 2010, the upper house of Parliament in India, the world's largest democracy, passed a constitutional amendment to reserve one-third of the seats in Parliament and State Assemblies for women. The lower house and at least half of the states...
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The Diversity in US Social Science
In the Winter 2010 issue, Kishore Mahbubani laments the fact that American social science has wrongly adopted methodologies modeled on the natural sciences, resulting in a baleful cultural myopia ("Beyond the Universal: The Cultural Myopia of US Social...
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The Game Mother Taught Me: Beyond Japan's Old Boys' Networks
In 2008, I was appointed as Japan's Minister of Defense, a post that oversees the 270,000 members of the Japanese Army, Navy, and Air Force--Japan's self-defense forces--as well as thousands of civilian defense officials within the ministry. Since...
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Too Good to Be True: The Remarkable Resilience of Microfinance
When the concept of underdevelopment took shape in the middle of the last century, the search for the holy grail of poverty reduction began in earnest. And while many answers to the daunting challenge have been offered, none of the ideas put forth...
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Woman of the House; Standing for Gender Equality in British Politics
The House of Commons has been known for some time as the mother of parliaments. Yet today, for too many, it is known as a debating chamber which thrives on aggressive and masculine speeches from its Members. Many people from both home and abroad see...
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