Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 3, Summer

Bad Medicine: AIDS, Culture, and Women's Health
WHEN FACED WITH A GLOBAL CRIsis, decision makers tend to search for a single, universally applicable solution. Often, this type of simple answer does not exist, making it necessary to develop more complicated strategies to address the problem. In some...
Below the Surface: The Technology of Landmine Removal
THE LANDMINE IS ONE OF THE MOST insidious threats to civilians in former combat zones. Acting as cheap, disposable soldiers, landmines can defend a stronghold or a transit route by slowing the advance of an attacking force. Small, cheap landmines are...
Blurring the Line: Islam and Politics in South Asia
ISLAMISM, THE MOVEMENT based on the belief that the Islamic religion should systematically determine and guide the political system and decisions of a nation, emerged as a force in South Asia in the 1930s, the same decade that it surfaced in other...
Breaking the Ice: The Need to Improve US-Cuban Relations
WHEN THE CUBAN AIR DEFENSE SHOT down two civilian planes earlier this year, killing four Cuban-Americans, the United States swerved away from the process of normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba. The details of the incident are unclear; little...
Caste and Class: The Rise of Hindu Nationalism in India
IN THE THREE YEARS from 1989 to 1992, India experienced the phenomenal rise in influence of the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). Many observers assumed that the BJP's influence would be short-lived, for Hindu nationalism violated the...
China's Golden Goose: The Economic Integration of Hong Kong
AT MIDNIGHT ON JULY 1, 1997, GREAT Britain's 99-year lease on Hong Kong will expire, and jurisdiction over one of the most modern capitalist cities in the world will officially pass into the hands of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Hong Kong...
China's Role in the Asia Pacific Region and Beyond
To the Editor--Recently, much has been said about China's role in East Asia. In your Spring 1996 issue, Gerald Segal wrote an article entitled "The Giant Wakes: The Chinese Challenge to East Asia," and Ronald N. Montaperto and Karl W. Eikenberry authored...
Clear Mandate: Reforming US and UN Peace Operations
The author wishes to express that the opinions presented in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Army. IN RECENT YEARS, peacekeeping and related activities have come to constitute a major concern...
Competing Nationalisms: Secessionist Movements and the State
SOUTH ASIA IS HOME to several world religions, over 30 major languages, a thousand dialects, and innumerable castes and subcastes. During the colonial era, princes held nominal rule over more than 580 separate states in India, while a number of other...
Double-Edged Sword: Nuclear Weapons and Regional Security
THE DISPUTE BETWEEN INDIA AND PAKISTAN appears to have come full circle since the 1950s and 1960s to rest once again on the contested state of Kashmir. But the destructive power possessed by both states has grown enormously since that earlier era,...
Elusive Harmony: South Asia's Half-Century of Independence
WHEN THE NATIONS OF SOUTH ASIA won their independence from the British almost 50 years ago, they were at once united and divided by claims of identity. A shared history and cultural civilization, as well as the common legacy of British rule and Indian...
Era of Transition: The Changing Face of Japanese Politics
MORIHIRO HOSOKAWA'S JULY 1993 lower house election was a benchmark in Japan's political history, signaling the interruption of 38 years of single party rule by the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). Hosokawa headed seven parties and a parliamentary group,...
Moving On: Chile's Alternatives to NAFTA
CHILE IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST SUCcess stories of the 1990s. With an annual growth rate of over seven percent per year--the second fastest in the world--Chile has caught the attention of businesses around the world, from the United States to the European...
New Approach: The Democratic Path to Peace in Sri Lanka
THE PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE GOVERNMENT which assumed office in Sri Lanka in 1994 inherited a complex of issues often referred to as "the ethnic conflict," the discord between the Sinhalese and Tamil communities, which respectively comprise 74 percent and...
Next Steps: Updating the CFE (Conventional Armed Force) Treaty
THE CONVENTIONAL ARMED FORCE in Europe Treaty (CFE), which went into effect in 1992, has resulted in deep cuts in the number of conventional weapons held by the nations of NATO and the former Warsaw Pact. Described by some as the cornerstone of European...
People's Europe: The Future of the European Union
SINCE ITS INCEPTION, the European Union (EU) has provided the world with an unprecedented model of successful international and intra-regional cooperation. European political and economic integration has culminated in the establishment of an area characterized...
Stalemate in the Valley: India, Pakistan, and the Crisis in Kashmir
SINCE DECEMBER 1989, Indian security forces have been engaged in suppressing a violent secessionist insurgency in the Valley of Kashmir. The insurgency in Kashmir grew out of a fundamental paradox of Indian democracy: while political mobilization in...
Surviving Scarcity: Sustainable Management of Water Resources
THE WORLD'S POLICYMAKERS often take for granted the assumption that the earth's supplies of usable water are essentially unlimited. However, as we enter the new millennium, that assumption is appearing less and less tenable. Per capita water supplies...
(Tamil) Tigers and the Lion: The Evolution of Sri Lanka's Civil War
ON DECEMBER 5, 1995, Sri Lankan government troops raised the golden lion flag of Sri Lanka over Jaffna city. It was a triumphant return to the city they had abandoned in defeat over five years earlier. Waves of celebration spread across southern Sri...
Transcending Divisions: The Consolidation of Pakistan
DURING BRITISH COLONIAL RULE, a superb feat of political engineering kept together several nationalities clearly differentiated by religion, ethnicity, language, and cultural tradition. As a result, the withdrawal of the colonial power in 1947 brought...
Unity in Diversity: Political and Economic Trends in India
PRAKASH SHAH HAS SERVED as India's ambassador to the United Nations in New York since February 1995. In his 34 years as an Indian diplomat, he has held a number of other positions, including a recent three-year term as ambassador to Japan. He has represented...
Unorthodox Approach: Conflict Resolution in a Changing World
JIMMY CARTER, President of the United States from 1977 to 1981, has earned almost as much recognition for his accomplishments since leaving the White House as for his legacy as President. In 1982, Carter established The Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia,...