Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 2, Summer

Abuse of Power: Assessing Accountability in World Politics
We read all the time that some person or organization in power should be "held accountable." Such demands are made on the UN Secretary-General, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Board of Directors of Enron, the President of the United States,...
A Long Journey to Peace: The Dispute in the Republic of Cyprus
The Republic of Cyprus joined the European Union as a full member on May 1, 2004 in the midst of jubilation among the Greek Cypriot population. The event confirmed the place of the Republic in the European family of states and created great prospects...
A Man on a Mission: Chilean President Ricardo Lagos's Health Reform Plan
In a speech delivered at the Government Palace just months after being elected President of Chile, Ricardo Lagos laid out his vision for his six years in office. "If we all work together," he proclaimed, "we shall be able to take a better look at our...
A Shallow Glimpse
In "Running After a Fallen Fox" (Spring 2005), author George W. Grayson provides an unbalanced description of Mexico and the administration of Mexican President Vicente Fox. The text pinpoints only certain aspects of Fox's performance, ignoring some...
Clash of Clans: Challenges to Somali Government
On October 1, 2004, Somalia's newly established 275-member Parliament elected the country's 14th president, Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed. Though Somalis and members of the international community hope that this new administration will bring peace to a region...
Election Angst: Indonesia's Tough Transitions
On September 20, 2004, Indonesia held its first direct presidential election in which former General Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono defeated incumbent Megawati Sukarnoputri by a landslide margin of 60.6 percent to 39.4 percent. While many expected the landmark...
End of Terrorism? ETA and the Efforts for Peace
A nationalist hard-line party of the Basque region, which consists of northern Spain and parts of southwestern France, has asserted Basque independence for the past 40 years. This party, known as Batasuna or Sozialista Abertzaleak, has been fighting...
Joining the Global Village: Taiwan's Participation in the International Community
Democratic reform in Taiwan, which has been praised as a "quiet revolution," has transformed Taiwan from an authoritarian regime into a democracy in which human rights and the rule of law are honored. Taiwan has been listed by the New York-based Freedom...
Learning to Optimize
Alistair McGuire and Victoria Serra correctly argue in "The Cost of Care: Is There an Optimal Level of Expenditure?" (Spring 2005) that taking an economic perspective helps us to consider whether a country's health spending is optimal and efficient....
Line in the Sand: The Ethio-Eritrean Border
Given the conflict in Iraq and the unfolding of genocide in Sudan, perhaps it should not be surprising that renewed hostilities between Ethiopia and Eritrea have failed to attract any meaningful international attention. Yet this conflict, which has...
Measuring Power: How to Predict Future Balances
Power is an elusive concept. As the political scientist Hans Morgenthau wrote, "The concept of political power poses one of the most difficult and controversial problems of political science." Understanding the nature of power has long been central...
Mending NATO: Sustaining the Transatlantic Relationship
In a recent interview with a reporter from Le Monde, Chancellor Gerhard Schroder pointed out that NATO is "no longer the primary means for dialogue in the transatlantic relationship." While this is hardly surprising in a contemporary context, it would...
Military Mayhem: The Decline in Japanese Pacifism
The end of the Cold War hailed an era of uncertainty over Japan's political and economic future. A receding economy, coupled with the ruling Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) fall from dominance in 1993, greatly dampened the pride and confidence of...
Nixing the News: Iranian Internet Censorship
Illegal suppression of the press in Iran is nothing new, as the government has been shutting down reformist papers for years. What is new, however, is the recent extension of the crackdown from newspapers to Internet sites and weblogs. The Internet,...
People Power Primed: Civilian Resistance and Democratization
Tisovets, a popular ski resort in the Carpathian Mountains, is a tiring four-hour drive in a four-wheel-drive from Lviv. The journey was exceptionally challenging for Ukraine's newly elected president, Viktor Yushchenko, and Georgian President Mikhail...
Private Authority: Non-State Actors and Global Governance
More than half a century since political scientists Harold Laswell and Abraham Kaplan advocated power analysis as a framework for political analysis of all forms, the concept of power has remained a highly contested concept in political analysis. Nowhere...
Stalin's Joke
When the French Foreign Minister suggested the USSR might placate the Pope by tolerating Catholicism, Josef Stalin famously quipped, "The Pope? How many divisions has he got?" It is an irony of history that the figure whose weakness Stalin scorned...
Strategic Interactions: Edward Bradfield Reviews How the Weak Win Wars
With the US military currently engaged in armed conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan, Ivan Arreguin-Toft's How the Weak Win Wars is a timely contribution to the ongoing debate over US defense strategy in the post-September 11 security environment. The...
The Disarmament Debate: The Fate of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty
What is the Lawyers' Committee on Nuclear Policy (LCNP) and what are its major goals for international arms control? The LCNP is a research and advocacy organization in New York City. It was formed by lawyers and academics in the early 1980s at...
The Politics of Power: New Forces and New Challenges
What are the primary forces that characterize power in today's world? What you are asking boils down to distinctions between different kinds of power. Power comes in a number of packages. You have military power, economic power, diplomatic power,...
The Road to Recognition: A Global Perspective on Gay Marriage
In the previous half century the world witnessed dramatic cultural upheavals. Factions of the right and left fought many political battles pitting traditionalism against progressivism, each side arguing for its vision of a virtuous society in the changing...
The Single Greatest Threat: The United States and Global Climate Disruption
Climate change--or better, climate disruption--is the single greatest threat that societies face today. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In 1979, the administration of US President Jimmy Carter asked the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to assess the...
Toward a New Consensus: Answering the Dangers of Globalization
We live in a world of "overlapping communities of fate." Everyday life--work, money, beliefs, as well as trade, communications, finance, and the environment--connects us all with increasing intensity. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The word for this...
Under the Fence: US-Mexican Immigration Issues
Over the past decade, tension at the US-Mexican border has heightened as an enormous influx of Mexicans has entered the southwestern United States. According to a study conducted by Mexico's National Population Council (CONAPO) in 2001, an estimated...