Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 1, Spring

A Lingering Identity: Toward a Post-Post-Soviet Future?
In 1991 the Soviet Union collapsed. But did it end? The year began with the violent reassertion of Soviet authority over Lithuania, an exhibition of brutality that rallied international support for democrats and independence movements in the USSR....
Armed Entrepreneurs: Private Military Companies in Iraq
Pejoratively labeled the "whores of war" or the "soldiers of fortune," personnel from private military companies (PMCs) have been receiving undue negative media attention because their duties seem so similar to mercenaries of the old-fashioned variety....
A Tale of Two Churches: Battling for the Soul of Latin American Catholicism
The hillside shantytown of La Carapita lies on the outskirts of Caracas, Venezuela. Its houses, which often hold up to ten people, are constructed mostly of thin cardboard and tin. Their religious leader is a spunky, 31-year-old nun known as Lourdes...
Bucking the Trend: Democracy and Economic Reform
At the start of transition from communist rule, skepticism reigned about the possibility of introducing markets and democracy simultaneously. Drawing on the recent experience of Latin America, many expected economic reforms to impose unbearable costs...
Calling for Aid: The Cry from Sudan
A peaceful Sudan was the lofty goal of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) signed on January 9, 2005, between the northern government of Sudan and the southern Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM). More than a year afterward, the situation...
Class Matters: Health Lifestyles in Post-Soviet Russia
The current health crisis in Russia is without precedent in modern history. Life expectancy has declined for men and stagnated for women in a persistent pattern since the mid-1960s. The average lifespan of Russian men declined by 5.2 years from 1965...
Crafting the Taiwanese: The Ambivalence of Taiwan's National Identity
Taiwan is a land of diversity. Travelers on Taipei's Rapid Transit Metro hear announcements in four different languages: English, Mandarin Chinese, Hakka, and Holo. For metro travelers and statesmen alike, this diversity is both a blessing and a burden....
Democratic Mirage: The Long Road Ahead in Egypt
In the Egyptian presidential elections of September 2005, President Hosni Mubarak's fourth re-election came as little surprise to the Egyptian people or the international community as a whole. Although lauded by some, progress of Egyptian democracy...
Exercising Wartime Powers: The Need for a Strong Executive
The Iraq is beginning to look like a rerun of the Vietnam War, and not just because critics are crying out that the United States has again fallen into a quagmire. War opponents argue that a wartime president has overstepped his constitutional bounds...
Exorcising Hobbes: Frank Anechiarico Reviews the War on Terror and the Framework of International Law
In the mid-seventeenth century's The Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes presents a dilemma to those designing and reforming the government structure: the choice between chaos and order brought by the surrender of personal choice to a "sovereign." In the series...
Gray Area: The Future of Chinese Internet
Morgan Stanley estimated that there were around 94 million Chinese Internet users at the end of 2004, making China second only to the United States in total numbers of Internet users. The Chinese government has struggled to hide its citizens from a...
Life of the Parti: Boisclair and the Parti Quebecois
The license plate says it all: "Je me souviens." Or does it? Quebec has maintained a strong regional and cultural identity despite being under Anglophonic control for the past 250 years. While Quebecois politics has not always encouraged the defiant...
Performance Philanthropy: Bringing Accountability to Charitable Giving
Rightly, 2005 will be remembered for the huge public generosity demonstrated in the face of multiple disasters. It should also be remembered as the year when traditional philanthropy displayed how stagnant and ineffective it really is. Not since...
Political Transitions: Democracy and the Former Soviet Union
The defeat of the August 1991 coup attempt in Moscow marked one of the most euphoric moments in Russian history. For centuries dictators had ruled Russia using force to suppress and at times annihilate society. Emboldened by liberalization under Soviet...
Preventing Disaster: Realizing Vulnerabilities and Looking Forward
The past 16 months have seen major disasters in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Hundreds of thousands of people have died and millions have had their lives changed forever. Some attention has focused on a possible increase in the frequency of natural...
Religion and the State: Why Moderate Religious Teaching Should Be Promoted
Should the US government and the international community actively promote religion overseas, especially in the Islamic world? Such an approach may seem wrong on many grounds. Religion is a major force driving jihadists in the Middle East, and separation...
Tackling Terror: Australia's Steps for Security
The apprehension of 16 terror suspects in Australia's two major cities serves as a timely reminder about the costs associated with the War on Terror. In early November 2005, federal police foiled a potentially large-scale attack after 500 police officers...
The Capitol's Cold War: Donald R. Wolfensberger Reviews Congress and the Cold War
Looking back on the Cold War today, 15 years after the fall of the Soviet empire, a first-year college student might ask a professor, "What was that all about?" Indeed, even at the height of the nearly half-century struggle between East and West, there...
The Sarkozy Factor: France's Big Decision
The French political world appears to be ready for change. At issue is not just the non vote in the referendum for the European Constitution in May 2005: discontent soars over the relatively dismal performance of the economy, debate rages over the...
The Way Forward: Georgia's Democratic Vision for the Future
Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Georgia inherited a wide array of challenges inherent to the post-Soviet political, economic, and geopolitical landscape: entrenched corruption, unaccountable political elites, external manipulation, a lack...
Toward the West: Baltic Realignment and Russia's Reply
While Russia may be regressing toward a strong authoritarian state with some features of the old communist regime, the three Baltic states--Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia--have been deliberately moving away from the Soviet legacy toward liberal democracy...
Trading Up? the Uncertain Future of the FTAA
The dream of free trade in the Western Hemisphere suffered yet another blow on November 6, 2005, as the Fourth Summit of the Americas in Mar del Plata, Argentina concluded with no progress for the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) agreement. Venezuelan...
US Foreign Policy: Missteps, Mistakes, and Broken Promises
TOM DASCHLE is the former US Senate Democratic Leader. He currently holds a visiting professorship at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute and serves as the Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]...