Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 4, Winter

Against More Aid: Why Development Assistance Should Not Be Tripled
Since the early 1990s, many have analyzed, criticized, lamented, and protested five decades of large-scale development aid gone disastrously wrong. They have made two main arguments. First, many low-income countries are hobbled by corrupt governance...
A Matter of Time: India's Emerging Economic Prowess
As the world's largest democratic republic and the home to a substantial English-speaking population, India appears poised to establish itself as a powerful engine for global economic growth. Though India, already the fourth-largest economy by purchasing-power...
A Work in Progress: Demystifying the European Security and Defence Policy
Since the December 1998 Saint-Malo summit between French President Jacques Chirac and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, we have been learning to live with a new acronym and a new reality: the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP). This is not...
Battle for Brains: Israeli Science and Technology
Throughout Israel's history, international attention heaped on the state has focused overwhelmingly on the region's political and religious tensions. Less noted in the midst of these conflicts is Israel's science and technology sector, which has been...
Below the Surface: Underground Economic Activity
Though policymakers, researchers, journalists, and others speak frequently of the underground economy, they often talk past each other because underground economic activity has not been clearly defined. Is it the production and distribution of illicit...
Changing Colors: Ukraine's Orange Revolution
Western media outlets initially hailed the presidential election of moderate reformer Viktor Yushchenko as an important step toward functional Ukrainian democracy. His Orange Revolution, a vast outpouring of public support and anger at government and...
Costly Growth: China's Environmental Woes
The introduction of market reforms in China in the 1980s has made China's economic growth impossible to ignore. With an annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate of nine percent, China is poised to assert its dominance within the next half-century....
Crossing over? Turkey and the European Union
In its quest for full membership in the European Union, the Republic of Turkey has traveled a long and arduous road. Having been an associate member of the European Union since 1963, Turkey became a candidate to be a full EU member in 1999. Finally,...
Exonerating Euros: Facing Italy's Economic Problem
During the initial discussions over the currency now known as the euro, Italy jumped at the opportunity to drop the lira in favor of a common European currency. Italians even willingly accepted the burden of new taxes necessary to cut their budget...
Financing Hope: Improving Microfinance
Speeding along on the back of a hired bicycle with tall stalks of maize on either side of me, I traveled from one African village to the next, working to convince men and women to join a small microfinance bank. On arriving in a village or trading...
Grabbing Hand: Corruption in Lula's Government
The almost three-year honeymoon of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Da Silva--Lula, as fellow Brazilians know him--is clearly over. As his party is deeply embroiled in a corruption scandal, Lula's prospects for reelection in 2006 are now not as certain...
Great Expectations: Intelligence as Savior
US citizens, who have long relied heavily on their intelligence services for the comfort of believing that calamities from abroad will not suddenly afflict them, have made that reliance even heavier in recent years. In a poll taken by Daniel Yankelovich...
Home-Grown Growth: Problems and Solutions to Economic Growth
DANI RODRIK is professor of international political economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and teaches in the School's MPA/ID Program. He has published widely in the areas of international economics, economic development,...
Kidney Kin: Inside the Transatlantic Transplant Trade
Lucille Hubbard is a tiny woman. Lucille, not her real name, is poor, black, and dependent on Medicaid and public assistance. After leaving the West Indies for New York as a young adult, Lucille made her living caring for people in need. Before turning...
Market Power
Markets determine the price of your morning cup of coffee and the value of your retirement savings. In ways less obvious but no less real, markets also determine your prospects of being targeted by a terrorist attack. They trade in nuclear weapons,...
On the Loose: The Market for Nuclear Weapons
Addressing the National Defense University in Washington, on February 11, 2004, US President George W. Bush warned about an underground market that has grave consequences for global security: "In recent years, another path of [nuclear] proliferation...
Perpetuating Conflict
In "From Geneva to Gaza: Implementing the Endgame Strategy of the Geneva Initiative" (Fall 2005), Daniel Levy wrote that the difference between the Geneva Initiative, of which he was a lead drafter, and previous solutions is that the Geneva Initiative...
Promethean America
David Held's "Toward a New Consensus: Answering the Dangers of Globalization," (Summer 2005), is at once ominous and ambiguous. While globalization and US President George W. Bush are castigated, there is precious little substance for the conclusion...
Slave Trade: Combating Human Trafficking
The underground market in people, termed human trafficking, functions by the benign rules of supply and demand--which makes this market particularly grotesque because the commodity is human life and the exchange results in modern-day slavery. By describing...
The Terror Market: Networks and Enforcement in the West
As underground economies provide unprecedented opportunities to generate resources, terrorists and criminals in the global south seek to ideologically and operationally penetrate their migrant and diaspora communities living in the global north. Terrorist...
Toward Re-Engagement: A Shift in US-Libyan Relations
Following the attacks of September 11, US foreign policy has increasingly focused on the threats of terrorism, extremism, and weapons of mass destruction. These are real challenges that unfortunately have been complicated by US involvement in Iraq....
Warped Renewal: Mugabe's Tightening Grip
At a time when Zimbabwe risked falling into an abyss of poverty and economic stagnation, the prospect of a determined government effort to restore order seemed attractive. But when President Robert Mugabe ordered the destruction of countless Zimbabwean...
Weary from War: Child Soldiers in the Congo
Now known as Africa's first world war, the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) began in 1998 among seven nations. The war has cost nearly 4 million lives, and its methods have proven equally vicious: the warring states and militia groups...