Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 2, Summer

A Global Framework: International Aspects of Climate Change
While it may seem that science contributes only marginally to international law, it was in fact a scientist, Garrett Hardin, who proposed a framework four decades ago that illuminates most of the international policy issues of climate change. Hardin's...
Cartoons and Controversy; Free Expression or Muslim Exceptionalism in Europe?
Europe thinks it has found a cogent way to spur the debate over the integration of its Muslim communities. Under the banner of free speech, Europeans have turned to satire and other forms of print and visual criticism to test Muslims' willingness to...
Cash Crop: Brazil's Biofuel Leadership
Brazil is making splashes across the world as the emerging leader of the biofuel industry. The significance of this nascent industry is rapidly growing as oil prices rise and awareness of environmental concerns increase. But the Brazilian dominance...
Chile and Latin America: The Challenges of the 21st Century
A new age is dawning for the world. We stand on the threshold of an era in which the political, social, and economic organization will be different from anything we have known so far. In the next few decades, people from all over the world will expect...
China's Healthcare Quandary: How Partial Privatization Values Quality over Equality
In 1978, Deng Xiaoping began the economic reforms now referred to as "Gaige Kaifang," through which China ushered in an era of unprecedented receptivity to foreign influence. The shift to liberalized trade policy led to reduced poverty levels and set...
Climate Trading: The Case for the "Climate Protection Authority"
Upon taking office, the new US president will immediately face major decisions on domestic and international climate policy. The United States and the rest of the international community have set December 2009 as the deadline for concluding a new global...
Engaging Iran
Senator Chuck Hagel ("At a Dangerous Crossroads," Spring 2008) is a rare and heartening voice of radical moderation in American national politics. His perspective is crucial at this time of shrill hyperboles toward Iran that threatens to lock all presidential...
From Prediction to Action: Meteorology and the War on Climate Change
The year 2007 was a special one for many international environmental organizations, as well as for the wider climate change scientific community. This was so thanks, in particular, to the successful approval of the World Meteorological Organization...
Green Modernization: Reflections from Europe
There are strong arguments for the thesis that climate change will develop into the single most important global problem of the first half of this century. Rising sea levels; hurricanes and their devastating consequences; ongoing desertification in...
Healthy Progress: Botswana Takes on AIDS
Ian Khama, Botswana's newly inaugurated president, is simultaneously inheriting one of Africa's most successful economies and one of the continent's most problematic health crises. Botswana boasts a consistent 9 percent growth rate in income per capita,...
Incentivizing Climate Mitigation: Engaging Developing Countries
The challenge of tackling human-derived climate change has emerged over the past two decades to become one of the most important, yet divisive, issues on the agenda of the international political community. Within international debates, developing...
Letter from the Editors
Climate change may prove to be the defining problem of the 21st century. In the last few years, this realization has swept has swept across the globe, increasing awareness of global warming as well as elevating concern about the future of our planet....
Militant Complex: Demarginalizing Indian Muslims
In the face of disenfranchisement and discrimination, Indian Muslims have turned to voicing their discontent in violent demonstrations. The recent wave of extremist fighting in India is often traced back to Islamic organizations, including Lashkar-e-Taiba...
More Musharraf: The Embattled Pakistani President Will Stay in Power
In the immediate aftermath of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's trouncing in the February 2008 parliamentary elections, pundits began speculating that his reign was over. A Reuters article published shortly after the rout was headlined "Pakistan's...
Peace in the Middle East: Strategies for the Containment of Extremism
You have stated that the "clash of ideas" in negotiation is valuable to diplomacy. But are there boundaries to the value of negotiation? When is a clash of ideas no longer positive, but destructive, and at what point does negotiation cease to be reasonable?...
Preventing Terrorism: A Case for Soft Power
Since its establishment five years ago, the Department of Homeland Security has played a pivotal role in mobilizing the efforts of the United States government to prevent and deter terrorists and other dangerous people from attacking the country. These...
Responsible Competitiveness: Making Sustainability Count in Global Markets
The need for a more responsible basis on which businesses and economies compete in international markets has never been greater. Global corporations with global strategies contribute to rising inequality and falling economic opportunities for lower-income...
Science and Politics: Accepting a Dysfunctional Union
Dan Sarewitz, professor of science and society at Arizona State University, argues that we should fully expect politicians to politicize scientific information because "that is their job...and this--like the second law of thermodynamics--is not something...
The Global Arms Trade: Strengthening International Regulations
Mr. President, you are internationally recognized as an advocate on behalf of the developing world. How has the international arms trade--"licit" and illicit--affected the economic growth of the world's poorest nations? More specifically, how has weapons...
The Putin Generation: How Will Its Rise Affect US-Russian Relations?
This year, young people are coming out in record numbers to support their political candidates, not just in the United States but in Russia as well. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Although the phenomenon has been relatively ignored by the Western media,...
The Road to Unity: Tenuous Progress in Cyprus
Hope for a different approach to reconciliation in Cyprus has brought new leadership to the long-divided Mediterranean island nation. Communist president Dimitris Christofias opened historic Ledra Street in the capital, Nicosia, in accordance with...
The US-Israeli Relationship: Special but Not Exclusive
In May 2005, I wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post entitled "Israel's Lawyer," making what I considered an incontestable point: if America wants to help reach an agreement between Arabs and Israelis, it must be an advocate for both sides. The...
Things Fall Apart: Violence and Poverty in Yemen
Recent unrest in Yemen indicates that the Gulf state--for decades the region's poorest--may be in slow-motion collapse. On April 6, 2008, an Al Qaeda bombing shook the capital city of Sanaa, capping a spree of political violence that killed 21 people....