Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 3, Fall

An Unwarranted Pessimism: Rethinking the European Integration Debate
When the French and Dutch referenda on the European Constitution failed in late spring 2005, Luxembourg held the rotating presidency of the European Union. A few days later, while chairing the EU Council of Ministers, I looked at the concerned faces...
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A Wealth Deferred: The Politics and Science of Golden Rice
The idea behind Golden Rice is simple. It starts with a disease: Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD), a wholly preventable scourge of the developing world. As the name implies, VAD is a dietary problem and is particularly prevalent in the developing regions...
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Canada Leads: Improving International Governance
PAUL MARTIN was Prime Minister of Canada from December 2003 to February 2006. A member of the Liberal party, he has been the Member of Parliament from LaSalle-Emard in Montreal since 1988 and served as Minister of Finance from 1993 to 2002. At the...
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Contending Nationalisms: Kashmir and the Prospects for Peace
Since 1947 the Kashmir dispute has bedeviled relations between Pakistan and India. It has led to three separate wars, in 1947, 1965, and 1971, and a serious armed conflict in Kargil in 1999. In addition, because both countries are declared nuclear...
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Coping with Disaster: A Challenge for International Institutions
Uncertainty, complexity, and rapid change will increasingly characterize humanitarian threats in the foreseeable future. These threats may range from the prospect of the 320-meter asteroid 99942 Apophis crashing into the Pacific rim in 2035 to Himalayan...
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Disconnected: Taxing Mobile Phones in the Developing World
It has been hailed as the development tool of the century. It has revolutionized business in Africa and Asia and has allowed the poor to cross countless institutional hurdles. And despite a paucity of electricity, infrastructure, and support services,...
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For an East Asian Union: Rethinking Asia's Cold War Alliances
At the conclusion of the Second World War, the United States established bilateral military alliances in the Asia-Pacific intended to contain Soviet and Chinese communist expansion in the region. US security strategy now focuses largely on combating...
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In Need of Aid: Cambodia's Corruption Troubles
Cambodian officials pocketed money designated for specific aid programs, the World Bank alleges. Though Prime Minister Hun Sen denies there is any reason for suspicion, denials are not enough. He must actively prove his government's innocence. Only...
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Island Economics: Free Trade in the Caribbean
How should the Caribbean region foster economic development? The question has long been on the minds of Caribbean leaders. Their small island states face significant hindrances to development, including modest populations, limited expanses of viable...
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Know Your Enemy: Why We Contemplate Catastrophe
As the world reflects on the fifth anniversary of September 11, the prospect of another catastrophe looms. From the explosion of a nuclear weapon in a major city to a pandemic that could kill millions, potential disasters inspire fear from citizens...
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Kurdistan: The Elusive Quest for Sovereignty
On March 16, 2006, angry Kurds in Halabja, Iraq, tore down a monument dedicated to the memory of the 1988 poison gas attacks by Saddam Hussein. Why would the Kurds destroy a monument with such symbolic importance three years after the end of Hussein's...
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Labor Law Matters: Trade Liberalization in Oman
Oman's economy is liberalizing. After accession to the World Trade Organization in 2000, the government shifted toward free market values, courted foreign trade and investment, and introduced industrial regulations and labor laws. The signing of the...
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Making Progress: Zambia's Improving Condition
A midst African stagnation, Zambia's economy is making progress. The nation has experienced annual average growth of 4.5 percent over the last six years. On President Levy Mwanawasa's invitation, foreign investments are pouring into the mining, tourism,...
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Open Tinderbox: Toward Lasting Peace in the Balkans
When Montenegro narrowly voted to break way from its loose union with Serbia in its May referendum, world leaders praised the peaceful election and embraced the re-emergence of the tiny nation. Attention quickly turned away from the Balkan region and...
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Policy Organizations: An Insider's View
Harvard Professor Lawrence Summers insightfully discussed how academic research can influence and hopefully improve public policy ("Bridging the Divide: When Policy Profits from Research," Summer 2006). He mentioned two main avenues: academics who...
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Porous Policies: Illegal Immigration in Europe
Europe has been losing its war on illegal immigration. According to various EU estimates, around half a million illegal immigrants still enter the European Union annually, even after years of measures that have included policing, detention, and repatriation....
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Risk and Reaction: Dealing with Interdependencies
With the increasing concentration of people and businesses in high-risk areas and the increasing interdependencies within the world, catastrophes are more likely than ever. Consider the disasters of Hurricane Katrina and the September 11 attacks. Not...
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Shock to the System: The Impending Global Energy Supply Crisis
For decades our conception of a serious global economic threat has been limited to wars or financial disasters. The possibility of energy issues morphing into economic disruptions faded as the world enjoyed decades of low energy prices and ample supplies....
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The Blame Game
Hussin Mutalib's essay ("Misunderstood: Political Islam in Southeast Asia," Summer 2006) is riddled with errors, but I shall focus on just one: his falling into the too-common pattern of blaming the Muslim world's tribulations on the West. Take for...
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The Next Battlefield: The Reality of Virtual Threats
In today's increasingly interconnected world, a person with a laptop computer can sit at a coffee shop in London and trade stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange, transfer funds from a bank account in Zurich to an account in Tokyo, chat on an...
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The Will to Prevent: Global Challenges of Nuclear Proliferation
Imagine that on September 11, 2006, the fifth anniversary of the September 11 attacks, terrorists successfully executed a nuclear terrorist attack in New York City. On a normal working day, more than 500,000 people crowd the area within a half-mile...
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With Values Aligned: Improving Saudi-US Relations
In April 2005, Crown Prince Abdullah, who would soon become King of Saudi Arabia, met with US President George W. Bush in Crawford, Texas, to discuss Saudi relations with the United States. When the meeting concluded, a joint press conference introduced...
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