Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 2, Fall

A Case Study for the Ages: Lee Kuan Yew's Reflections and Predictions
It goes without saying that President Barack Obama has access to the world's best sources for critical information on issues such as the revival (after all, it is not the first rise) of China, the future of India, and the threat of Islamic extremism....
Afghan after ISAF: Prospects for Afghan Peace and Security
Summer 2013 brought one of the most violent fighting seasons in Afghanistan since the US military and state-building effort began in 2001. On the cusp of the momentous 2014 presidential elections and a year before the majority of international coalition...
A Financial Hub's Future: Can Cyprus Retain Its Banking Sector?
Will the recent Cypriot crisis change the structure of the Cypriot economy? The country's economic strength has, in recent years, stemmed from its banking sector, with bank deposits amounting for over seven times the country's GDP in 2010. In the aftermath...
Back to the Drawing Board: The Challenges of Humanitarian Action
Disasters are not only increasing in number, they are becoming more complex as natural and man-made crises combine to cause mega-disasters. Rapid urbanization, population growth, political unrest, and migration have created fragile environments in...
Breaking the Cycle: Targeting Sources of Violence against Women
It happens all the time, hut it still surprises me when I hear the women I work with in India's rural villages discuss violence and forced sex with disconcerting nonchalance. They say things like, "if I don't cook well, can't take care of the children...
Calling All Gaijin! Immigration Reform for Japan
According to the United Nations, the world's demographic profile will be radically different in the year 2100. Mid-range population projections predict that in 2100, Japan's population will have fallen to under 100 million, over 28 million less than...
Change Management: Reflections on the State of US Foreign Policy
What do you see as key achievements in national security and foreign policy during your tenure under President Bush--and what do you see as key failures, regrets, or missed opportunities? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] During the Bush Administration,...
Doomed from the Start: Looking Back on Afghanistan, 2001
It has been over a decade since the war in Afghanistan first began and the United States is still feeling consequences from the failures of the counterinsurgency strategy (COIN) it deployed. The eventual failure of these efforts in Afghanistan should...
Dreams of a Bygone Era? Re-Envisioning Civil Rights in the Modern Age
In August of 1963, the United States was swept up in unprecedented mass mobilization. Two hundred thousand Americans--black, white, rich, and poor from across the nation--poured into the National Mall in Washington, D.C. armed with picket signs, freedom...
Ecotourism's Hidden Cost: "Green" Tourism's Colonial Toll
Golden rays set on the verdant canopy of the Amazon--a sea of green stretching across the horizon. But it is a beautiful scene that is increasingly under threat. Deforestation, mining, and agriculture destroy over 78 million acres of forest each year....
Effective Aid: Ensuring Accountability Humanitarian Assistance
Humanitarian assistance is aimed at providing rapid, life-saving support in settings of high population vulnerability, such as in times of war, disaster, or displacement. The provision of humanitarian assistance is complicated by severe access restrictions,...
Future of International Aid: Helping the Helpless by Finding
By 2015, we will have nearly eradicated extreme poverty and hanger throughout the world by halving the proportion of people living on under $1.25 per day. We will have achieved universal primary education worldwide, reduced child mortality rates by...
Land Degradation: The Hidden Face of Water Scarcity
Last year, the world met its Millennium Development Goal of halving the number of people without access to safe drinking water, five years ahead the 2015 deadline. However, 11 percent of the world' population, or 783 million people, still live without...
Letter from the Editor
Water is the common denominator of human life. From the primordial cradle of civilization to sprawling megacities, we have built our societies around sources of water. But as pervasive an element of our biosphere as water is, limitations to freshwater...
Malaysia's Transformation: Propelling Malaysia to Developed Nation Status
Malaysia has one overarching and transformative policy objective: to achieve high income and developed nation status by the year 2020. High income nations, as defined by the World Bank, are those with a gross national income per capita of US$12,480...
Managing the Arctic: Norwegian Perspectives
To most people the Arctic is a distant realm, almost another world, inhabited by polar bears. They may even think the frigid landmasses and icy seas of the Arctic are irrelevant to daily life further south. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] However, the...
No Reason to Stop: North Korea Needs Its Nuclear Tests
In recent years, news of North Korea is inevitably accompanied with the words "nuclear", "reactor, "ICBM", or some combination of those words. After all, the first half of 2013 saw news of another nuclear weapons test, the launch of a satellite, as...
On the Move: The Neoliberalization of US Public Transportation
The possibilities for constructing environmentally sustainable public transit infrastructure in the United States are strongly shaped by the logic and policies of neoliberalism. In brief, neoliberal ideology advocates for the extension of market-based...
Shifting Sands: Land and Water Management in the Middle East
While the Middle East is frequently in the news because of political volatility and violence, there is an underlying lack of environmental equilibrium that poses a comparable threat to regional stability. Israel's neighbors--Egypt, Jordan, and Palestine--are...
South Africa in the BRICS: Evolving International Engagement and Development
South Africa will celebrate its 20 years of democratic rule next year, following the demise of apartheid in 1994. The ruling African National Congress (ANC), which is also the oldest liberation movement on the continent, celebrated its 100th anniversary...
The End of the Cookie Cutter: Economic Development in the Modern World
The Washington Consensus was developed in 1989 to describe the "standard" reform package promoted for developing countries by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and the US Treasury Department. These prescriptions encompassed fiscal...
The World's Blind Spot: Shedding Light on the Persecuted
Children starve. Young girls sell their bodies to eat. There is no clean drinking water. There are no doctors. Refugees are not allowed to leave the camps. As the rainy season approaches, waterborne diseases will spread like wildfire. This is the plight...
Water Wars: A Surprisingly Rare Source of Conflict
Water seems an unlikely cause of war, but many commentators believe it could define 21st Century conflict. A February 2013 article in U.S. News and World Report warns that "the water-war surprises will come", and laments that "traditional statesmanship...