Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 3, Winter

African Urbanization: Slum Growth and the Rise of the Fringe City
Eko Atlantic is a city that rises "like Aphrodite from the foam of the Atlantic," wrote Nobel Prize winner Wole Soyinka. The city is defined by sustainability, luxury, technology, and i economic opportunity. It is Africa's own Dubai; a gleaming gateway...
A New Kind of Colonialism: The Ramifications of Intellectual Property Rights
Indigenous peoples have been marred for centuries by the incredulous theft of knowledge they obtained, and even resources they use. The thieves are superior, more developed powers that jealously protect the rights to knowledge that is not rightfully...
A New Strategic Connection Growing Brazilian Influence in the Middle East
HUSSEIN KALOUT is a Brazilian political scientist, former Head of International Affairs of the Supreme Court, and the Special Counselor on Middle Eastern Affairs with the Brazilian government. Currently he is a research fellow at the Weatherhead Center...
China's Power Quest: Changing the World Order
A burgeoning economy and the overall growth of a country epresent the most likely precursors to a large-scale conflict spurred by revisionist sentiment. Historical examples to corroborate this realist interpretation of international relations theory...
Christ the out of Touch: Catholicism's Fading Future in Latin America
A amajestic, powerful figure, Christ the Redeemer Aafar above the Brazilian city of Rio De Janeiro--a physical manifestation of the power nd authority of the Catholic Church. Upon 'ts completion in 1931, the statue symbolized the hope and prosperity...
Diplomacy in Space: The Final Frontier of International Law
Questions concerning the ownership of space are nothing new. Several Yemeni men claim that the mythologies of the ancient Himyaritics and Sabaeans justify their inheritance of Mars; in 1996, a German man argued that the Prussian emperor Frederick the...
Exclusion by Assimilation: Native Social Engineedring in Alaska
"Disaster is like everyday life, but more so." --Rebecca Solnit [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Kivalina is an Inupiat village of 350 people that sits on two square miles of doomed Alaskan coastline. The state of Alaska and the U.S. government consider...
Free, Prior and Informed Consent: Empowering Communities for People-Focused Conservation
Imagine subsistence hunters in Brazil, or farmers in the Andean highlands, or fishing communities in Cambodia. Each of these geographically disparate groups is among the indigenous peoples of the world whose livelihoods, cultures, and identities are...
Fukushima's Lessons for Boston: Debating the Future of Nuclear Energy
In the days after die March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, the world was unaware of what was happening in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, but it was increasingly clear to the Japanese leadership that a catastrophic disaster was brewing....
Hawai'i: An Occupied Country
One hundred and twenty years have passed since the United States Marines were deployed to support a coup by a small group of sugar businessmen against the democratically elected, Native-led, independent government of Hawai'i. Presently, the Hawaiian...
Indigenous Rights in Western Countries
The Canadian government has always tried to maintain Canada's reputation as a beacon of democracy and of a model of social contract theory. But James Anaya, the United Nations' special rapporteur on indigenous rights, may be challenging the impeccable...
Letter from the Editors
Globalization is the buzzword of the 21st century: everything that happens is either the fault of or the fruit of it. It is hard to deny that we live in a world infinitely more connected than ever before, as technology shepherds many previously inaccessible...
Putin's Supposed Popularity: A Review of Ben Judah's Fragile Empire
There is a possibility that Vladimir Putin will be president of Russia until 2024. For a politician that has held the Russian presidency for eight years and the premiership for five, this would an impressively long reign. It is easy to interpret this...
The Crisis in Mali Outline the Course to Peace and Stability
DR. JEAN PING is a Gabonese diplomat and politician who was the Chairperson of the AUC (African Union Commission). He was previously Gabon's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs from 1999 to 2008. Ping also served as the President of the United Nations...
The Future of Finance: The Post-Crisis Commercial Culture
Six years ago, the world was brought to its knees by the collapse of a particular financial market that was not understood by most of those trading in it, let alone by most members of the public. The media have repeatedly dissected the causes and the...
The Future of Indigenous Parties in Latin America
After a long period of relative quiescence, indigenous movements in Latin America have mobilized. A wave of indigenous protests swept through the Andean countries eginning in the 1980s and made its presence felt as far north as Mexico. Indigenous groups...
The Global Fund Presents: More Health for the Money at the Global Fund Achieving Efficiency in Resource Allocation
The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria is one of the world's largest funders of global health programs. From 2002 to 2011, the Global Fund disbursed about US$15.5 billion to support programs aiming to prevent and treat the three diseases,...
The Indigenous Palestinians: Twice Dispossessed by the Biblical Text
On November 10th, 2013, the Israeli cabinet voted in a special session to authorize the demolition and removal of Umm al-Hiran, an "unauthorized" Palestinian Bedouin village in the Negev Desert. In its place was to be built a new community for national...
The New Italian Miracle: Disaffection and Political Upheaval in Italy
For decades, Italy was one of the most stable democracies in the Western world. Despite the instability of its cabinets and challenges from the largest Communist party in Europe, its fundamental pillars remained unchanged from the late 1940s through...
The Orfaela Center Presents ... Chile: Country or Change: Backgrounds of Chilean Politics after the Elections
The Chilean Presidential and Parliamentary elections of the first-round general election on November 17th and the second round run-off for the presidency between remaining candidates Michelle Bachelet and Evelyn Matthei on December 15th, 2013 were...
To Keep the Peace: Contributing UN Peacekeepers
In 1988, the Nobel Peace Prize went to the Blue Berets--the United Nations Peacekeeping Forces. The Nobel committee praised it for its "contributions towards the realization of one of the fundamental tenets of the United Nations", peacekeeping. More...
Zimbabwe: What Next? Anticipating an Uncertain Future
PROFESSOR ROBERT I. ROTBERG is the Founding Director of the Kennedy School's Program on Intrastate Conflict and President Emeritus of the World Peace Foundation. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and Fulbright Research Chair...