U.S. Catholic

This magazine publishes news, opinions and reviews about issues concerning the everyday lives of Catholics.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 1, January

A Big To-Do: When Life Becomes a Series of Checklists, It's Easy to Lose Sight of What's Really Important
1. GO TO MASS I can't get through one day without a checklist. No Black-Berry or Palm Pilot for me, though. I organize my life the low-tech way, with 3-by-5 index cards on which I scribble endless "to-do" lists. Make a goal, write it down, do it,...
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Colorblind
COLORBLIND Robert Randolph and the Family Band (Warner Brothers, 2006) The one-line blurb on Robert Randolph and the Family Band could be, "Sly and the Family Stone, without the drugs." The music of this black-led, racially-mixed ensemble leaps...
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Days of Our Lives: When Seen with Eyes of Faith, Calendars Help Us Keep Time with Christ
MORE THAN ANY PARTICULAR ELEMENT OF Catholic spirituality, the church's calendar gives me comfort. It offers the hope that I can progress in my spiritual life, even in areas where I have failed in the past. Every year provides one more round of seasons...
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Finance Ministers: "Prosperity Gospel" Preachers Claim to Know the Good News-And for a Nominal Fee, You Can Have It, Too
WHEN JESUS BEGAN HIS public ministry in Luke 4:18, he announced he had been sent to "preach Good News to the poor." According to a small but growing number of today's televangelists and megachurch pastors, the Good News Jesus came to proclaim is that...
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Five Ways to Become One: Rather Than Go Down with the Ship, Christians Can Come Together for the Common Good. Making It Work Can Be as Simple as Grabbing a Cup of Coffee or Picking Up a Hammer
On January 23, 1943 the USAT Dorchester set sail from New York Harbor, bound for a U.S. military base on Greenland. Aboard were 900 passengers and crew. Watching over them were four Army chaplains: Father John Washington, a Catholic priest; George...
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Girl Power
IT'S EASY TO MISS THE SMALL STOREFRONT CAFE IN EAST LOS Angeles. If you notice it, you might think Homegirl Cafe is just another small business trying to make it in this barrio known for its tough streets. But inside, the beautiful large bouquets of...
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Good Things Come in Small Parishes: Dioceses Are Attempting to Solve the Priest Shortage and Save Money by Closing Small Parishes, but These Communities Deserve a Chance to Support Themselves
WHENEVER A DIOCESE ANNOUNCES PARISH closings, I cringe. I often wonder what prompted the decision, especially if it was determined just by the size of the parish or if the vitality of the community was given consideration. I also wonder if the real...
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Guess Who's Not Coming to Dinner? the List of Those "Not Worthy" to Be Called to Christ's Supper Keeps Getting Longer
THE RECENT WEDDING OF A HIGH SCHOOL FRIEND included the expected accessories: elegant bridesmaids and groomsmen, well-dressed attendees, a beautifully appointed church. But on the now-standard wedding program, I was surprised to find that the greatest...
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Local Boy Makes Good: Our Natural Tendency to Envy Hometown Heroes Can Make It Difficult to See That God Gets to Decide Whom to Bless
"YOU'LL NEVER GUESS WHO CAME TO TOWN LAST week!" Margaret exclaimed as she burst through my front door. "Who?" I asked. Margaret lives in a nearby university town where interesting people are more likely to surface. "It was B.!" she shouted triumphantly....
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Redesigning Women: Is the Church's 'New Feminism' a Good Fit?
Last spring at the University of Notre Dame a heated debate about campus performances of the controversial play The Vagina Monologues made national news, provoking widespread debate not only about academic freedom at Catholic universities but also...
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The Departed
THE DEPARTED Directed by Martin Scorsese (Warner Brothers, 2006) Martin Scorsese doesn't believe in nations; he believes in tribes. For him all politics is local and bloody, and tribal loyalty holds together the patchwork of neighborhoods we mistake...
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There Is a Balm in Tapologo: Ravaged by HIV/AIDS, Women and Children from a South African Squatter Camp Find Hope at a Volunteer-Run Clinic
Two years ago Selinah was lying on a mat at the altar of the Catholic mission in Phokeng, South Africa. Weighing only 86 pounds, she shivered with fever as the AIDS virus took over her body. Surrounded by other patients of the Tapologo AIDS Hospice,...
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They Can Do It: Third World Women Could Be the New Recruits in the Global War on Poverty
SINCE COMMODITIES FIRST CHANGED HANDS FOR CASH, the women among us have worked hard for the money--often, as they still do today in the developing world, putting in a full day of labor in the field before heading back for a second job keeping the homestead...
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Who Picked My Bishop?
In most of the world a handful of other bishops picked your bishop. The current process begins with an ecclesiastical "province," which is made up of one archdiocese and one or more dioceses. Any bishop may submit to the archbishop of his province...
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Women and Children First
From 1978 to 2006 Sharon Daly tried to convince politicians to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and heal the sick through legislation. Fighting bureaucracy, big business, and partisan politics for 28 years could frustrate some, but Daly loved lobbying...
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Working without a Net
Ladies and gentlemen, welcome--you've arrived just in time for the annual U.S. CATHOLIC women's issue. To begin, pull up a couch and let's watch an Oprah rerun: the one where Illinois Sen. Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, confessed to having the...
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