The Washington Monthly

An independent monthly magazine devoted to politics, government, culture, and the media in America, from a progressive perspective. Publishes investigative and opinion-based feature articles by notable authors, short news items, humorous sidebars, and boo

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 6, June

Black and Blue
Why does American richest black suburb have some of the country's most brutal cops? NO ONE HAD TO WARN PRINCE JONES about the police department in Prince George's County. The cops in Maryland's second most populous county had a reputation for turning...
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CIVILIZATIONS: Culture, Ambition, and the Transformation of Nature
IN HIS INTRODUCTION, FELIPE Fernandez-Armesto does his best to deter you from reading his new book, Civilizations. He warns that he has written it "in something like a frenzy, anxious to get down what I wanted to say before I forgot it," and, additionally,...
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HOW CITIES WORK: Suburbs, Sprawl, and the Roads Not Taken
THE ONLY THING AMERICANS hate worse than sprawl is density. Nobody likes the traffic and the architectural ugliness in and around virtually every metropolitan area in this country, but building on bigger lots and cheaper land remains hard to resist....
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HUMAN TRIALS: Scientists, Investors, and Patients in the Quest for a Cure
THE VAST MAJORITY OF BOOKS about biotechnology spend endless pages trumpeting the triumphs of genetic medicine and the coming age of wonder drugs. Susan Quinn wants to try something different and instead chronicles the heartbreak of a biotech company...
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IN THERAPY WE TRUST: America's Obsession with Self-Fulfillment
IF YOU ARE INTO EUPHORIMETERS, this book is for you. The Euphorimeter was developed in the 1930s by researchers at Duke University as a test of marriage compatibility for those seeking a mate. The person's level of happiness was measured in "Euphor"...
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Ker-Splat!
How comic books lost their edge COMIC BOOKS MADE ME A SNOB. AS A child, I was riveted by Spider-Man and went on to become meticulous about my comics' condition and completing series numbers. Now they lie entombed in acid-free boxes and Mylar bags...
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KILLING PABLO: A Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw
WHEN THE U.S. GOVERNMENT went to war against Latin America's drug barons in the 1980s, it couldn't have asked for better poster boys than Pablo Escobar and Manuel Noriega. Flamboyant bad guys who reveled in their notoriety, they were greedy; violent,...
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Letters
Mormonizing? I was disappointed with Stephanie Mencimer's article criticizing the influence of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Utah ("Theocracy in America," April 2000). Even as a non-Mormon who has spent only a week in Utah,...
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Monkey Do
Bush's White House is repeating the Clinton administration biggest mistake. IF THERE'S A SINGLE PRINCIPLE THAT motivates George W. Bush, it's that he's no Bill Clinton. As a candidate, Bush didn't find his voice until a McCain commercial in the...
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Oh. Canada
Like the rest of us, Bush doesn't care about Canada. Big mistake. IN THEIR DEALINGS WITH THE UNITED States, Canadians frequently wind up feeling like Elizabeth Taylor's husbands: They have one humiliation after another heaped on them, they often...
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PRIVILEGED SON: Otis Chandler and the Rise and Fall of the L.A. Times Dynasty
SITTING HOME ON A SUMMER night a few years ago, listening to the Dodgers on the radio, I finally dropped off to sleep around midnight, score tied in the 12th. I subscribed to two newspapers in those days: the thin and scrappy Los Angeles Herald-Examiner...
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The Baby Boycott
Conservatives thought that if they only made it harder for mothers to work, women would stay home. Instead, women stopped having kids. REMEMBER THE BAD OLD DAYS when Congress and the White House were at war over the Family and Medical Leave Act?...
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The Body Politic
Jesse Ventura sure can talk. If only he could govern. WHAT'S NOT TO LIKE ABOUT JESSE Ventura's life? The former wrestler overcame a lack of money and party structure to snatch 37 percent of the vote and win a three-way race back in 1998. Now, Minnesota's...
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The Price of Citizenship: Redefiningthe American Welfare State
THE BULK OF MICHAEL KATZ'S The Price of Citizenship is taken up by a long compendium of all the ways in which the American welfare state has diminished over the past 20 years. We all know about the abolition of the 60-year-old Aid to Families With...
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The Super
L.A. Superintendent Roy Romer may be the most talented man ever to run a big-city school district, also bound to fail. There's a lesson in that. ROY ROMER FLIPPED THROUGH THE 20-page list of demands and felt the anger rising. He'd rushed across...
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Tilting at Windmills
Monolingualism at the CIA * The Hazards of E-mail * Rove's Jag Spy Planes Off Catalina * Changing the Guard THE GOOD NEWS ON THE CELL phone front: I rode on two Amtrak Metroliners last month and each had a quiet car in which cell phones were banned....
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Who's Who
Republicans are starting to whisper that Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill might be on the way out in another year or so, perhaps to be replaced by Larry Lindsey, currently chairman of the National Economic Council. O'Neill has publicly expressed doubt...
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