The Washington Monthly

An independent monthly magazine devoted to politics, government, culture, and the media in America, from a progressive perspective. Publishes investigative and opinion-based feature articles by notable authors, short news items, humorous sidebars, and boo

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 1, January-February

A Fast-Track Reality Check: A Veteran Reporter Looks at the Not-So-Nifty Side of NAFTA
Like many other long-time free traders, I was persuaded (in retrospect, perhaps lulled) by the arguments in favor of NAFTA, the treaty that created a common market linking Mexico, Canada, and the United States, when it passed Congress in late 1993....
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Amazing Grace: Can Churches Save the Inner City?
Bart Campolo is not your typical Christian evangelist. In his buzz cut and combat boots, he looks more like Vanilla Ice than one of those well-dressed people who knock on suburban doors and offer to tell you The Good News. When you ask him why he's...
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Capitol Hill's Longest-Running Outrage: Congress Winks While the Mining Companies Shaft the Taxpayers
Congress winks while the mining companies shaft the taxpayers Joining the Senate in 1975 was a traumatic experience for me. I had been governor of Arkansas for four years and I was accustomed to making policy, giving my approval to legislation that...
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Is Locking 'Em Up the Answer? for Violent Criminals Probably - for the Rest, It's Not So Clear
For violent criminals probably--for the rest, it's not so clear It's a politician's dream come true. For the second year in a row, the Clinton administration has had the pleasure of announcing that, after a decade-long rise in crime, America's streets...
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It's the Exam That Fails: How the INS Citizenship Test Misses the Point
How the INS citizenship test misses the point As a young man in Ethiopia, Binyam Tamene was not exactly the silent type. "I thought the world was free, and I was saying things openly," he remembers. The Communists then in power weren't quite so progressive....
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Living off the Fat of the Land: The Only People Benefiting from Diet Books Are the Authors
The only people benefiting from diet books are the authors The American dieter surely hath no greater enemy than the American diet book. Like modem-day Ponce de Leons, tens of millions of Americans scour the landscape looking for the miraculous fountain....
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Mama, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Regulators: But If They Do - 10 Survival Tips
But if they do--10 survival tips During my four years as chief of staff to Reed Hundt, the recently departed chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, the FCC was involved in a flurry of high-profile policy battles. From the first auctions...
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Meet the (Black) Press: What Black Newspapers Can Teach the Mainstream Media - and What They Can Learn from Them
What black newspapers can teach the mainstream media--and what they can learn from them. Last summer the California General Assembly debated and passed a new welfare-to-work law that will radically overhaul the state's entitlement program. But although...
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Reporting from the Trenches: Welfare Reform Is One Area Where the Press Has Looked beyond the Spin to Where the Rubber Meets the Road
Welfare reform is one area where the press has looked beyond the spin to where the rubber meets the road Washington often seems to be fonder of make believe than of reality. The clearest evidence of the trait is its tendency to view a problem as...
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Tilting at Windmills
Julia's Choice * Designing for Polygamy * Auditing the IRS When the Royalton Wasn't Royal * Losing on Lumber The New York Times recently devoted the better part of two pages to a story entitled "A House, Ten Wives: Polygamy in Suburbia." What the Times...
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