The Wilson Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 4, Autumn

A Banana Republic
Drawn in, perhaps, by the bitter banana trade war between the United States and the European Union, Virginia Scott Jenkins, a scholar at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, peels back the fruit's yellow veneer in her new book, Bananas: An American...
Architecture's Class Struggle
"Class Notes" by Michael Benedikt, in Harvard Design Magazine (Summer 2000), Harvard Univ., Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. Architects believe that theirs is a helping profession, writes Benedikt, director of the...
Ataturk's Ambiguous Legacy
As if nature had not been generous enough, history has endowed Istanbul with extraordinary beauty. Its skyline is a parade of mosques, with pencil-like minarets that climb toward the sun, more than a few of them touched by the genius of Sinan (1489-1588),...
Brazil's Young Democracy
A Survey of Recent Articles The full flower of democracy came late to Brazil, nearly five centuries after Europeans first arrived, but finally, little more than a decade ago, it did come--and so far, it has survived. But its roots are shallow, and...
Crowd Control
"Coping with Crowding" by Frans B. M. de Waal, Filippo Aureli, and Peter G. Judge, in Scientific American (May 2000), 415 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017-1111. Ever since a psychologist in the 1960s packed a bunch of rats into a room and observed...
Editor's Comment
Americans are not likely to hear much about the issue of privacy in this year's presidential election, and for good reason. Even the specialists and advocates are still struggling to comprehend the many ways in which new information-related technologies...
FDR, Fiscal Conservative?
"The Forgotten Legacy of the New Deal: Fiscal Conservatism and the Roosevelt Administration, 1933-1938" by Julian E. Zelizer, in Presidential Studies Quarterly (June 2000), Center for Presidential Studies, Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX 77843-4349....
From Tbe Center
George Bernard Shaw once wrote, "Peace is not only better than war, but infinitely more arduous." Israelis and Palestinians have learned that lesson well. Although no longer at war, they have struggled for years to achieve a lasting peace. One of...
Grave New World
The American Sociological Association held its 95th annual meeting this past August at a couple of Washington hotels, and the event would have warmed the heart of anyone who thinks the world's in need of saving by social scientists. The theme of...
Initiatives for Sale?
"Ballot Boxing" by John Maggs, in National Journal (July 1, 2000), 1501 M St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Ever since Proposition 13, the controversial tax-cutting measure that California voters approved in 1978, ballot initiatives have been the...
Journalism's Bay of Pigs
For reporters, it has long been a resonant cautionary tale: how the New York Times erred by not telling all it knew about the planned Bay of Pigs invasion before the misadventure took place on April 17, 1961. "If you had printed more about the operation,"...
Lifeblood of the Parties
"One Cheer for Soft Money" by Steven E. Schier, in The Washington Monthly (July-Aug. 2000), 1611 Connecticut Ave., NW., Washington, D.C. 20009. Almost no one this election year has a good word to say about unregulated "soft money," that supposedly...
Lincoln and the Abolitionists
History records Abraham Lincoln as the Great Emancipator, yet ardent abolitionists of his day such as William Lloyd Garrison viewed him with deep suspicion. That the 16th president eventually achieved the abolitionists' most cherished dream, says biographer...
Lost in the Funhouse
"Welcome to the Funhouse" by Jed Pen, in The New Republic (June 19, 2000), 1220 19th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 Once it was a center for the collection, study, care, and exhibition of fine art--but not any more, protests Pen, art editor of...
Megamerger Mania
"The Dubious Logic of Global Megamergers" by Pankaj Ghemawat and Fariborz Ghadar, in Harvard Business Review (July--Aug. 2000), 60 Harvard Way, Boston, Mass. 02163. Everywhere one looks in the globalizing economy, companies seem to be rushing pell-mell...
Our Data, Our Selves
It's Friday night, the end of a tough week. You're ready to relax with your family, and you've enjoyed cooking a meal together. A wonderful aroma of spices and sesame oil fills the kitchen. Just as you sit down to dinner, the phone rings. A computer...
Paradise Lost
In a recent piece on movie houses old and new, the New York Times published a photo of the interior of Loews Paradise Theater in the Bronx. The only adequate response to the photo mixed disbelief, laughter, and regret in just about equal measure. The...
Reporter, Heal Thyself
"Coverage by the News Media of the Benefits and Risks of Medications" by Ray Moynihan, Lisa Bero, Dennis Ross-Degnan, David Henry, Kirby Lee, Judy Watkins, Connie Mah, and Stephen B. Soumerai, in The New England Journal of Medicine (June 1, 2000),...
Shock Economics
"A Shocking View of Economic History" by Larry Neal, in The Journal of Economic History (June 2000), Karl Eller Center, 202 McClelland Hall, Univ. of Arizona, P.O. Box 210108, Tucson, Ariz. 85721--0108. Neal, a professor of economics at the University...
Spinning the Spinsters
"'The Best or None!' Spinsterhood in Nineteenth-Century New England" by Zsuzsa Berend, in The Journal of Social History (Summer 2000), Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213. In the eyes of some historians, 19th-century New England spinsters...
Spreading Sunshine
"Will Globalization Make You Happy?" by Robert Wright, in Foreign Policy (Sept--Oct 2000), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1779 Maasachusetts Ave NW Washington D.C. 20036. Thanks to globalization, many of the world's have-nots are smiling...
The African Connection
"Making the Connection: Africa and the Internet" by Mike Jensen, In Current History (May 2000), 4225 Main St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19127. To Americans, it may seem as if the whole world is wired. It isn't, as the case of Africa shows. But, as the...
The Anatomy of Grade Inflation
"Grade Inflation: What's Really behind All Those A's?" by Lisa Birk, in Harvard Education Letter (Jan.--Feb) 2000), Gutman Library, 6 Appian Way, Cambridge Mass. 02138. It's no secret that today's teachers hand out more high grades than yesterday's...
The Costs of Fish Farming
"Effect of Aquaculture on World Fish Supplies" by Rosamond L. Naylor et al., in Nature (June 29, 2000), Porters South, 4 Crinan St., London NI 9XW, UK. Fish farming (a.k.a. aquaculture) looks at first glance like a sure-fire way to take some pressure...
The Diesel Revolution
A Survey of Recent Articles Future historians of our time may find it odd that, as Maury Klein, a professor of history at the University of Rhode Island, notes, scholars in recent decades have expended more effort assaying the social significance...
The Dust Bowl Myth
Americans today know the Dust Bowl migrants of the 1930s from Dorothea Lange's moving photographs and John Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath. The reality was a little different. Of all the grim spectacles created by the Great Depression, none has won...
The Genetic Surprise
So strong is the American aversion to "socialized medicine" that neither major candidate in this year's presidential election has dared question the fundamental role of the private sector in underwriting the U.S. health care system. Indeed, most health...
The Hegemonic Hamburger
"The French Exception" by Sophie Meunier, in Foreign Affairs (July-Aug 2000),58 E. 68th St., New York, N.Y. 10021. Resistance to American-led globalization is, well, global, but the French, as usual, are a special case. Theirs is the only 21st-century...
The Housework Monster
"Why 'More Work for Mother?': Knowledge and Household Behavior, 1870-1945" by Joel Mokyr, in The Journal of Economic History (Mar. 2000), Karl Eller Center, 202 McClelland Hall, Univ. of Arizona, P.O. Box 210108, Tucson, Ariz. 85721-0108. One of...
The Mystery of Aztec Sacrifice
"Aztec Human Sacrifice as Expiation" by Michel Graulich, in History of Religions (May 2000), Univ. of Chicago Press, 5720 S. Woodlawn, Chicago, Ill. 60637. In the centuries before the Spanish conquest in the early 1500s, the Aztecs of Mexico ritually...
The Paradox of Child Labor
"Eliminating Child Labor" by Miriam Wasserman, in Regional Review (Apr.-June 2000), Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, P.O. Box 2076, Boston, Mass. 02106-2076. Many Americans have been horrified to learn that shoes, clothing, soccer balls, and other...
The 'Populist' Batista
"The Architect of the Cuban State: Fulgencio Batista and Populism in Cuba, 1937-1940" by Robert Whitney, in Journal of Latin American Studies (May 2000), Cambridge Univ. Press, Journals Dept., 40 W. 20th St., New York, N.Y. 10011-4211. Cuban strongman...
The Pragmatist's Faith
"'Loyal to a Dream Country': Republicanism and the Pragmatism of William James and Richard Rorty" by Daniel S. Malachuk, in Journal of American Studies (Apr. 2000), Cambridge Univ. Press, Edinburgh Building, Shaftesbury Rd., Cambridge, CB2 2RU, England....
The Relevance of Realism
"Structural Realism after the Cold War" by Kenneth N. Waltz, in International Security (Summer 2000), Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Univ., 79 John F. Kennedy St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. To hear some analysts tell...
The Turkish Miracle
Earthquakes, usually the most costly in human lives of all natural disasters, tend to be utterly unrelieved calamities. But the deaths of some 18,000 Turks on August 17, 1999, may be remembered as a sacrifice that inspired a kind of miracle. Measuring...
Toasting a Black Russian
"Soul Man" by Anne Lounsbery, in Transition (2000: No. 84), 69 Dunster St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. (www.TransitionMagazine.com) It's a curious fact, often ignored in the past by white Americans, that Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), the celebrated...
Unlocking the Green Pharmacy
We live in an age when research on the human genome promises to revolutionize the way we cope with disease. At such a time, the most traditional of healing systems, plant medicine, would seem to have little to offer. But plants may hold therapeutic...
What Will America Risk?
A Survey of Recent Articles When the United States has used military force in the Balkans and other hot spots in recent years, protecting the lives of its pilots and soldiers has been a high priority--too high, some analysts contend. As several...
"Who Murdered 'Marigold'?-New Evidence on the Mysterious Failure of Poland's Secret Initiative to Start U.S.-North Vietnamese Peace Talks, 1966"
Working Paper No. 27 of the Wilson Center's Cold War International History Project. Author: James C. Hershberg One of the minor mysteries left over from the Vietnam War is the question of whether a genuine opportunity to open peace talks between...
Who Was Kennewick Man?
"Baffle of the Bones" by Robson Bonnichsen and Alan L. Schneider, in The Sciences (July-Aug. 2000), New York Academy of Sciences, 2 E. 63rd St., New York, N.Y. 10021. Recent archaeological discoveries have opened up the startling possibility that...
Why Privacy Matters
At the beginning of the 21st century, America is, more than ever, a culture of exhibitionism that also claims to be a culture concerned about privacy. Citizens cheerfully watch Big Brother TV, or set up Web cams in their bedrooms, even as they tell...
Women in Science
"Parity as a Goal Sparks Bitter Battle" by Constance Holden, in Science (July 21, 2000), American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, 1200 New York Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Though more and more women have opted for scientific careers...