The Wilson Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 4, Autumn

At Sea in the World
In New Perspectives Quarterly (Summer 1994), former secretary of state Henry Kissinger points to profound sources of confusion in U.S. foreign policy. How might America apply the concept of equilibrium in the post-modern world? In order to apply the...
Disorder and the Courts
Fighting "serious" crime by lengthening prison sentences, banning some semi-automatic weapons, and putting more cops on the beat, as President Clinton's federal crime legislation provides, is all well and good. But the more common "crime" problem in...
Does Job Training Work?
If superior skills and education are the keys to success in the job market, then it may seem logical for government to underwrite job-training programs. Yet ambitious initiatives by the Clinton administration have been beaten back and scaled down in...
How Asia Sees the West
In Asian Survey (March 1994), Denny Roy, a lecturer in political science at the National University of Singapore, limns the so-called "soft authoritarianism" that has emerged in East Asia as an increasingly popular challenger to Western liberal democracy....
Losing Control of Immigration
A Survey of Recent Articles In this nation of immigrants, illegal immigration remains one of the decade's most highly charged issues. By official estimates, some 3.5 million aliens now live in the United States illegally, and 200,000 to 300,000 more...
Nixon's Final Crisis
Journalist David Halberstam suggests in the Columbia Journalism Review (July-Aug. 1994) that former president Richard M. Nixon's campaign to rehabilitate himself, in part through the shrewd use of television, did not end with his death. Anyone watching...
On the Side of Civilization
Joseph Conrad, says essayist Joseph Epstein in the New Criterion (June 1994), may be thought of "as Henry James for people who prefer to read about the out-of-doors." A Pole who wrote in English, a modernist artist who believed in the most old-fashioned...
Oppenheimer Investigated
Thirty-eight years old when appointed head of the Los Alamos Laboratory, J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904-67) became one of the more astute strategic thinkers about the nuclear age he helped to create. After facing charges of disloyalty--charges as groundless...
Pain and America's Culture of Death
Throughout history, people have called for medical practitioners to assist in the deaths of patients suffering from intractable pain as a result of advanced disease. But while many doctors themselves have advocated such assistance, including those of...
Pain's Dominion: What We Make of Pain
Medical science works new wonders every day, but until recently Western physicians and scientists have shown remarkably little interest in pain. That is beginning to change. David Morris survey today's rethinking of the nature and treatment of pain....
Poetry: Evgeny Rein
A quarter century ago, during a chance kitchen-table conversation in what used to be called Leningrad, someone--perhaps it was even me--christened Evgeny Rein an "elegiac urbanist." This characterization now strikes me as rather inadequate, perhaps because...
Take This Job
Why do so many Americans throw so much into their work? One surprising reason, writes sociologist Seymour Martin Lipset, a Wilson Center Senior Scholar, in The Public Interest (Winter 1990), is that they like their jobs. Beliefs about the work ethic...
Technology's Revenge
In his science-fiction novel of 1952, Player Piano, Kurt Vonnegut imagined a future in which the ingenuity of engineers has allowed machines to eliminate virtually all manual labor. The social consequences of this technological creativity, in his vision,...
The Breaks
Body-snatching space pods--they resemble squash with a thyroid condition and hormonal imbalance--first invaded the earth in the mid-1950s, so we're coming up on a 40th anniversary. Fall asleep near one of them, and the malevolent pod will suck the life...
The Great American Job Hunt: Getting Started
During the past dozen years, the U.S. economy has created vast numbers of new jobs. Not only have the usual newcomers and millions of immigrants found work, but unprecedented numbers of women have been accommodated as well. Yet "good" jobs--offering...
The Immigrant Challenge
Not since the Great Depression has the United States seen a tide of anti-immigrant sentiment to rival today's. So strong is public feeling that it helped drive President Bill Clinton to reverse the nation's long-held policy of welcoming any refugee who...
The Language of Pain
Why do you write so much about pain? they ask me. To give it a name, I reply. And I am not sure what I mean. I try again: In October, when the leaves have fallen from the trees, you can see farther into the forest. Now do you see? No? Well, what is your...
The New National Pastime
Take me out to the ballgame? Forget it, writes Gerri Hirshey of the New York Times Magazine (July 17, 1994). Gambling is now bigger than baseball, more powerful than a platoon of Schwarzeneggers, Spielbergs, Madonnas, and Oprahs. More Americans went...
The Return of Natural Law
Ordinarily, it should not be left to judges to say what natural law requires, the late Russell Kirk, author of The Conservative Mind (1953), argues in Policy Review (Summer 1994). Natural law is "derived from divine commandment; from the nature of humankind;...
The Strange Birth of Liberal France
The rise of a truly liberal political order was one of the glories of France's "trentes glorieuses," as the first 30 years after World War II came to be called. Yet only in more recent decades has a new generation of French thinkers begun to challenge...
The Virtual Job
Something very odd is going on in the American corporate workplace. Employees are being told to prepare for a radical new condition of permanent insecurity, a future full of sporadic layoffs, endless efforts to upgrade job skills, and perpetually recombining...
Who Creates Jobs?
The U.S. economy may have failed to produce rising wages during the past 20 years, but it has been a prodigious creator of new jobs. Since 1980, the nation has gained some 20 million net (after subtracting those that were lost) new jobs, and payrolls...
Will the Endangered Species Act Survive?
A Survey of Recent Articles Last June, an American bald eagle, found months earlier with a broken wing and nursed back to health, was set free in Maryland near the Chesapeake Bay. As the majestic creature soared into the sky, it carried even more than...