The Wilson Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 3, Summer

Affirmative Action: A Symbol under Siege
It was never supposed to be permanent, and after some 30 years the time may have come for government "affirmative action" to cease. Senator Joseph Lieberman (D.-Conn.), upon assuming the chairmanship of the moderate Democratic Leadership Council earlier...
After the Big Crunch
In the beginning, roughly 10 billion years ago according to modern cosmology, was the Big Bang. The universe has been expanding ever since. Whether it will keep doing so forever, we do not know. It may be--if the density of matter in the universe is...
Enemies of Promise
We live in an age of scientific triumph. Science has solved many of nature's puzzles and greatly enlarged human knowledge. And the fruits of scientific inquiry have vastly improved human welfare. Yet despite these proud achievements, science today is...
From the Heart of the Heart of the Former Yugoslavia
Bosnia has become a synonym, along with Beirut, Somalia, and Rwanda, of murderous conflict and political anarchy. The tragedy of this Balkan nation, a Sarajevo-born journalist explains, cannot be understood apart from the larger story of Yugoslavia's...
George Starbuck
Once upon a time, there was a poetry entrepreneur-cum-anthologist named Oscar Williams who was the maker and breaker of the budding careers of young poets by dint of his powers to include or exclude them from his Little Treasury series of American or...
How to Build a Suburb
Even its defenders concede that the modern American suburb had many shortcomings. An antidote may be found in the ideas of the nation's earliest suburban pioneers. When the Swiss-born architect Le Corbusier visited New York City in 1935, he found it...
Learning from the Fifties
Contemplating the turmoil and stress of the last three-and-a-half decades, many Americans idealize the easeful golden days of the 1950s. But as our author shows, the price of security and community may be higher than most Americans are now willing to...
Rejecting the 'Vision Thing.' (Response to Dean C. Hammer, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Spring 1995)
The presidency of George Bush remains a puzzle. Time magazine summed it up in January 1991, when it named the 41st president "Men of the Year": a double image of him was splashed on the cover as if to say, "George Bush, bold leader of the crusade against...
The Crisis of Contemporary Science
With the United States no longer engaged in war, hot or cold, American science is entering a new--and certain--age. The close relationship between science and government is being redefined. The exponential growth of the scientific enterprise is at an...
The Death of Hume
Seventeen seventy-six was a momentous year in Great Britain: Edward Gibbon published volume one of Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations appeared, the American colonies declared their independence, and David Hume--called...
The Edgy Decade
How it has happened is something that only future historians will be able to explain: somehow we have traveled halfway through the current decade without giving it a name. The absence of such a tag line is, apparently, sorely felt. The editors of the...
The Paradox of Yeltsin's Russia
Recent events in Russia raise fears that authoritarianism is making a comeback. Our author finds that the danger is not an overly powerful state but an enfeebled one. Russia today may be a new federation of 21 republics and 49 oblasts regions), but...
The Retail Revolution
The retail business once seemed fairly simple: the humble merchant chose from the goods available from manufacturers and wholesalers, then offered the array to his customers, at prices largely determined by the manufacturers. Not any more, reports the...
Tom Paine's Place in History
He was the author of Common Sense (1776), the most influential pamphlet of the American Revolution, and of other stirring works, including an essay that famously began: "These are the times that try men's souls. He labored in behalf of liberty and the...