The Wilson Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 2, Spring

A Crisis for Catholic Writers? (Arts & Letters)
"The Last Catholic Writer in America?" by Paul Elie in Books 6 Culture (Nov.-Dec. 2001), 2001), P.O. Box 37060 Boone, Iowa 50037-0060. This essay is not really about the "last Catholic writer in America"-there isn't a "last." Today, "if you ...
A Posthuman Future? (Science, Technology & Environment)
"How to Regulate Science" by Francis Fukuyama, in The Public Interest (Winter 2002), 1112 16th St., NW., Ste. 530, Washington, D.C. 20036. "Regulation brings with it many inefficiencies and even pathologies," writes Fukuyama, a noted conservative...
A Scholarly Crime Wave. (the Periodical Observer)
A Survey of Recent Articles "Teachers are supposed to be role models in students' lives," declared Roy Groller, a sophomore at the University of Pennsylvania. "They should try to lead by example." He was explaining to a New York Times reporter...
Asia's Individualists. (Other Nations)
"Two Funerals and a Wedding? The Ups and Downs of Regionalism in East Asia and Asia-Pacific after the Asian Crisis" by Douglas Webber, in The Pacific Review (No. 3, 2001), Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis, Inc., 325 Chestnut St., 8th fl.,...
A Source of Human Rights. (Excerpt)
Several features (of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights] set it apart from both Anglo-American and Soviet-bloc documents, and these should be kept in mind as contests over the meanings of the Declaration's provisions continue. Consider the...
Baby, It's Busy Up There! (Science, Technology & Environment)
"The Gas between the Stars" by Ronald J. Reynolds, in Scientific American (Jan. 2002), 415 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017-1111. A new and startling picture of the vast interstellar regions of the Milky Way has emerged over the past several...
China's Persecuted Catholics. (Other Nations)
"A Tale of Two Bishops" by M. A. Thiessen, in Crisis (Feb. 2002), 1814 1/2 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. In a dingy Shanghai apartment, an 83-year-old man in "a moth-eaten sweater and worn slippers" greets the first Westerner he has met...
Coffee, Tea, and Colonialism. (Society)
"The Essence of Commodification: Caffeine Dependencies in the Early Modern World" by Ross W. Jamieson, in Journal of Social History (Winter 2001), George Mason Univ., Fairfax, Va. 22030. It's astonishing to consider how much of early European...
Curious Science. (Science, Technology & Environment)
"Fighting Chance" by Siddhartha Mukherjee, in The New Republic (Jan. 21, 2002), 1220 19th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Last fall, in the wake of the anthrax attacks on several news organizations and Capitol Hill offices, Harvard University...
From the Center
I need not tell you, gentlemen, that the world situation is very serious," Secretary of State George C. Marshall said when he unveiled the great plan that bears his name at Harvard University in the fateful summer of 1947. His words ring as true...
How Britannia Lost the Waves. (Foreign Policy & Defense)
"The Continuing Argument over Jutland" by Louis D. Rubin, Jr., in The Virginia Quarterly Review (Autumn 2001), Univ. of Virginia, One West Range, P.O. Box 400223, Charlottesville, Va. 22904-4223. The Battle of Jutland, one of the great naval battles...
John Rawls and the Liberal Faith
John Rawls, a giant of modern political philosophy, has worked throughout his career to articulate the theoretical foundations of liberalism. Almost against his will, Rawls has suggested that those foundations are entangled with, and fortified by,...
Letter from a Russian Village
The village puts food on the Russian table and serves as a personal safety net for city-dwelling relatives. In return for their pains the farmers get a fragile form of independence, but at a great price. It starts with the hands. Hands that have...
Living with Microbes
Human beings have long used antibiotics and other weapons to wage war on microbes. But microbes seem to evolve almost as quickly as scientists devise new means to destroy them. It is time to abandon the war paradigm, the authors argue, and embrace...
One Nation? (Politics & Government)
"Bowling Together" by Robert Putnam, in The American Prospect (Feb. 11, 2002), 2000 L St., N.W., Ste. 717, Washington, D.C. 20036, and "A Stronger Nation" by Alan Wolfe, in The Responsive Community (Spring 2002), 2020 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Ste....
Over There. (Press & Media)
"Foreign News: What's Next?" by Michael Parks, in Columbia Journalism Review (Jan.--Feb. 2002), 2950 Broadway, Columbia Univ., New York, N.Y. 10027. While much of the U.S. news media's coverage of foreign affairs since September 11 shows "American...
Rebirth of a Notion
The new Bibliotheca Alexandrina opens this spring on the shores of the Mediterranean atop the foundations of a great lost legend. Will it be a beacon of intellectual hope and openness for a country sorely in need of one? An ordinary library with...
The Death Penalty's Strange Career
Last year, 66 convicted murderers were executed in the United States, and several thousand still sit on death row. Yet 30 years ago, with public support for capital punishment seemingly on the wane, the Supreme Court ruled every death penalty statute...
The Decline of Commercial Architecture. (Arts & Letters)
"Design and Development" by Witold Rybczynski, in Wharton Real Estate Review (Fall 2001), Lauder-Fischer Hall, 3rd fl., 256 S. 37th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104-6330. Commercial real estate developers, who are responsible for the vast majority...
The Gift That Keeps on Giving. (Arts & Letters)
"Intellectual Property" by Frederick Turner, in American Arts Quarterly (Fall 2001), P0 Box 1654, Cooper Station, New York, N.Y. 10276. One great irony in the recent furor over Napster--the Internet-based company that allowed users to freely...
The Return of the Imperial Presidency?
One lesson of American politics since September 11 is that some tensions between presidents and Congress spring from a deeper source than the partisan passions of the moment. Moments after President George W. Bush finished his stirring antiterrorism...
The Winds of War. (Foreign Policy & Defense)
A Survey of Recent Articles When an essay calling for the invasion of Iraq appears in the well modulated pages of Foreign Affairs (March-April 2002), the leading forum of America's foreign policy establishment, it's hard to see what's left to...
Turkey's Choice. (Other Nations)
"Dreaming in Turkish" by Stephen Kinzer, in World Policy Journal (Fall 2001), Q Corp., 49 Sheridan Ave., Albany, N.Y. 12210. Two words define Turkey today, writes Kinzer, former Istanbul bureau chief for the New York Times. The first is istiklal...
What's Wrong with Human Rights? (Religion & Philosophy)
"The Attack on Human Rights" by Mcihael Ignatieff, in Foreign Affairs (Nov.--Dec. 2001), 58 E 68th St New York N.Y. 10021. Even human-rights activists have been plagued by doubts in recent decades: Isn't the claim that all humans are endowed with...
Who Needs Courage? (Religion & Philosophy)
"The Ambivalence of Political Courage" by Jason A. Scorza, in The Review of Politics (Fall 2001), Univ. of Notre Dame, P.O. Box B, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556. Political courage is not much in favor among contemporary liberal political thinkers. They...
Words, Words, Words. (Findings)
* In both Greek (mys) and Latin (musculus), the same word can mean, depending on context, "mouse" or "muscle." In Prime Mover: A Natural History of Muscle, Duke University biologist Steven Vogel surmises that an ancient--one of those brawny discus...