The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 10, October

A Consensus on Global Leadership - Both Gore and Bush Are Active Internationalists Who Favor Free Trade
Foreign and defense policy traditionally take a backseat to domestic concerns in presidential elections. This is especially true in noncrisis times and certainly appears to be true in 2000. When asked in polls, "What is the most important problem facing...
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A Domestic Choice, Not an Echo - Gore and Bush Have Fundamental Differences on Domestic Issues from Education to Taxes
When a nation is at peace, the domestic issues--education, health care, social security, the economy, and crime--customarily take center stage in any presidential election year. According to the Gallup Organization, inflation, gas shortages, and the...
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A Glorious Jungle of Art Nouveau
An exhaustive exhibition exploring the myriad roots and persuasions of Art Nouveau comes this month to Washington's National Gallery of Art. Many artists have claimed to ride a wave of the future. Usually this has to do with arrogance and a somewhat...
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A Glorious Secret - among Belgium's Trappist Brewers
Inside the church of Belgium's Westmalle Abbey, the year could be 1200. White-robed monks file silently through shafts of sunlight to kneel before the austere altar. Each man bows to murmur a supplication. Though a nonbeliever, I am struck by the timeless...
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A Tale of Two Conventions - the Big Night
UNITED STATES--During the final installment of a four-day gathering devoted to themes, the GOP Convention came to the point. It nominated George W. Bush and heard his acceptance speech. Bush delivered. ... The text included effective punchlines...
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Blacks Break Through
Once only seen in comedic series and rarely behind the camera, some blacks are now appearing in serious dramas, while others are making inroads into the production side of the business. For a few brief moments, the doctor thought he might have magical...
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Can a State Have a Foreign Policy?
In June 1996, Massachusetts passed a statute that barred its state agencies from buying goods or services from any person doing business with Burma, a country whose democratic government, in place since independence in 1948, was overthrown by the military...
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Castles on the Rhine - A Stretch of the Rhine, Germany's Great River, Calls Travelers with the Song of the Lorelei
The soft chugging of the auto ferry, gently rippling the river as it crept along, was putting me to sleep. I laid my head back on the seat and listened to the gurgling engine, eyes open just a crack. Then I noticed the castle. Rising from a jagged...
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Colin Heaney - on the Edge, Down Under
Colin Heaney has proven that to make incredible art glass it does not matter where you work. In a five-man studio located in remote Byron Bay, on the northeast coast of Australia about five hundred miles from the nearest glass scene, Heaney has been...
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Dancing to Development - Pampang Village and Culture Tourism in Borneo
It is Sunday afternoon in East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. I am seated in one of a ragtag fleet of dented vans, the mainstays of the local transportation system, winding north from the provincial capital, Samarinda. My fellow travelers and I are...
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Demystifying Magnetism
Published in 1600, De Magnete, William Gilbert's book on the properties of magnets, bridges the divide between medieval scholarship and modern science. Without the magnetic compass, Columbus, da Gama, Magellan, Drake, and other great navigators...
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Ethical Challenges in Online News
The U.S. Constitution charged that certain basic tenets cannot be transcended by time's passage or societal innovations. Similarly, codes of journalistic ethics have been written with a broad brush; not intended to address the minutiae of the moment,...
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Facing Desertification
Developing and implementing sustainable agriculture methods for the world's huge degrading dryland regions are major tasks for the twenty- first century. The face of desertification is bleak, barren, hopeless, and ancient. Humans have been destroying...
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Facing Desertification - in Praise of Grazing
Few people have invested as much time and effort in studying desertification's global and historical implications as Allan Savory, a wildlife biologist from Zimbabwe who founded the Savory Center for Holistic Management in Albuquerque, New Mexico....
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Fame and Poverty - the Career of Nigerian Novelist Cyprian Ekwensi Exemplifies the Plight of the African Writer
Charles R. Larson is professor of literature at American University in Washington, D.C., and the fiction and book editor of Worldview. Larson's books include The Emergence of African Fiction (1972); he edited the anthology Under African Skies: Modern...
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Germany: Strides Abroad, Struggles Within
On October 3, 1990, one of the most enduring--not to mention sorrowful and hated--icons of the Cold War was obliterated. On that day, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), which had been known for 45 years as West Germany, officially absorbed the...
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Gore and Bush Begin Their Campaigns
From the early appearances of African Americans Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice through a seven-minute speech in Spanish by California assemblyman Abel Maldonado to the compassionate conservatism of presidential nominee George W. Bush, the Grand...
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Guarding the Stones of Venice - Lamp by Lamp, Fountain by Fountain, Stone by Stone, Some of the Most Basic Artworks of Venice Are Disappearing, and a Grassroots Group of Venetians Want It to Stop
If you saw them walking alongside the canal you would not imagine the three of them as men of particular courage or as activists in defense of beauty. They appear, simply, to be three friends out for a walk. If you watched them closely, you might even...
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Hillary's Campaign-Anything Goes?
Stanley A. Renshon is professor of political science at the City University of New York, a certified psychoanalyst, and the author of six books and over sixty articles. His psychological biography of President Clinton, High Hopes: The Clinton Presidency...
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Impersonators of Spirits - the Hopi Kachina Season
The Hopi believe that spirits exist not only in humans and animals but in all things--including plants and the elements. These katsinam are impersonated in Hopi ceremonies by dancers called kachinas. From mid- December to mid-July, the kachinas perform...
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Inside the Party Platforms - the Conclusion Is Inescapable: Democrats Tilt to the Left, Republicans to the Right in Their Basic Philosophy
The platforms of 2000 speak volumes--actually two volumes--about the Republican and Democratic parties and their new leaders, George W. Bush and Al Gore. They are wordy but accurate guides to what the parties accomplished in the past, stand for in...
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Issues Have Presidential Consequences
Even in our horse race--driven, poll-saturated presidential campaigns, issues have consequences. Ronald Reagan stressed the need for smaller government and a stronger national defense in 1980 and won the presidency. Bill Clinton campaigned in 1992...
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Managing Our PreciousLiquid Asset
As water supplies are constrained by rising demands, uneven distribution, and pollution, effective management must integrate diverse factors, including water quality and availability, hydroelectric power, flood control, and ecosystem conservation....
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'Ontario's Flourishing Shaw Festival
The only such venue exclusively devoted to plays by George Bernard Shaw and his contemporaries, the Shaw Festival at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, has steadily grown from promising yet humble origins into a world-class event. With a candidness that...
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'Ontario's Flourishing Shaw Festival - A Man for All Reasons
Could anyone be better suited for his job than Christopher Newton? Since his inaugural season as artistic director in 1980, Newton, 64, has developed a distinctive personality for the Shaw Festival, based on his commitment to a permanent acting ensemble...
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Player in Germany's Peaceful Revolution
Little Alfred Radeloff was plucked from his family in the eastern German city of Dessau at the age of nine and placed in a school 300 miles away designed to make him the pride of Nazi Germany. And the institution's sophisticated indoctrination achieved...
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So Many Temples - the Timeworn Majesty of Myanmar's Bagan
Slowly the first fingers of light appear. The horizon forms. Morning yawns awake to the hollow echoes of a gong struck somewhere in the darkness below. Shapes emerge from the mists. Among the trees, stupa after stupa, pyramid after pyramid gradually...
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Spoiled by Tourism - Hmong Children of Northern Vietnam
"Come back to the village," a Hmong mother barks at her young daughter, Saw, who stands a short distance away. "Come back to the village!" she says again, her voice hoarse with illness and fatigue. Saw, dressed head-to-toe in the indigo blue of the...
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The Effects of Divorce on America
American society may have erased the stigma that once accompanied divorce, but it can no longer ignore divorce's massive effects. As social scientists track successive generations of American children whose parents have ended their marriages, the data...
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The Elections
The elections are next month, and I am increasingly unhappy. I do not expect politicians to be teachers--although I hope they would be--but I wish they would stop polluting the public debate on the issues. I know they must scramble for votes, but I...
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The Netherlands Opera - Making a Virtue out of a Vice
Built on a spectacular site, the hall that houses Amsterdam's De Nederlandse Opera is both an eyesore and an acoustical nightmare. Small wonder the company capitalizes on production values and a knack for the bizarre. Amsterdam--a city beloved by...
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The Refashioning of Christianity and Science - Dynamic Interactions between 1200 and 1700
Prior to and during the scientific revolution, discussions and debates between theologians, arts masters, and scientists led to the profound restructuring of both science and Christian theology. On the face of it, the period from the high Middle...
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The World in 2000
Gregory R. Beabout is associate professor of philosophy at Saint Louis University and the author of Freedom and Its Misuses (Marquette University Press). In his Pensees, mathematician Blaise Pascal makes the point that human knowledge is limited...
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Trekking in Ladakh - an Autumn Visit to the Mountains of Little Tibet Is Best Achieved with the Help of a Local Guide and His Donkey
As it is late in the year and snow threatens to close the overland routes momentarily, I have flown to Leh on an Air India flight from New Delhi. Below me lies the scarred and dusty palm of the Indus Valley, its ancient gnarled foothills like knuckles....
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Why Roosevelt Wanted Japan to Attack Pearl Harbor
Morton A. Kaplan is Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the University of Chicago and editor and publisher of The World & I. For fifty years I had dismissed the argument by World War II revisionists that Roosevelt...
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