The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 9, September

A Fairytale's Ending - the Changing Status of Norway's Royal House
In 1841, Asbj[inverted question mark]rnsen and Moe published one of the most popular of Norwegian books: a collection of fairytales gathered from all parts of the country. A storyline repeated in many of them is reminiscent of the Horatio Alger stories....
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Affirming Their Presence - Peru's Cholos Assimilate within Their Own Nation
Walking around the upscale neighborhood of Miraflores, in Lima, Peru, I casually observe the daytime scene. The streets and squares are filled with well-dressed young office workers flirting, chatting, or searching for a lunchtime bargain at a discount...
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A Historic Trial
Slobodan Milosevic is awaiting trial for crimes against humanity in The Hague. The onetime Serbian strongman was turned over to the United Nations in June, after Yugoslav authorities seized him on April 1. The arrest and extradition was a dramatic...
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Bridging the Gap - Learning Languages Has Taken a Quantum Leap as It Enters the Twenty-First Century
The waiter is from Mauritania, the diner from Korea. The service is awfully slow. Rady Mohammed has taken orders from everyone else in the room, and Park Yoo Kyoung is becoming irritated. "I want to speak to the manager!" she demands. Babacar Sambe,...
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Christian Clubs in Public Schools
After the Founding Fathers drafted the U.S. Constitution establishing the framework for the new federal government, widespread opposition remained, because the document didn't expressly protect individual liberties and states' rights. So it was that...
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Crossroads of the Alps - an Archaeological Expedition to Saint Bernard Pass, Famous for Its Dogs and Isolated Much of the Year by Snow, Reveals Its Stark Beauty and Rich History
Pass: A way or opening by which one passes through a region otherwise obstructed or impassable. ... I lie awake in the albergo above Aosta, full of jet lag and apprehension. The next day I am to go up into the Alps (terrified, unworthy, small),...
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Do We Need a UN?
Ten years ago, President George Bush hailed the United Nations as a new force for global peacekeeping and the foundation of a "new world order." A major reason was the Security Council's strong support of the Persian Gulf War. Today, the United...
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Ed Moulthrop - Bowling 'Em Over
Ed Moulthrop is simply America's best woodturner. Since the early seventies, the Atlanta-based artist has been giving the challenging craft his full attention. In the process, he has created a body of work that draws out the full flavor and character...
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Global Warming Coverage Melts Down
Over the past hundreds of millions of years, scientists tell us, the earth has cooled and warmed in a natural pulse over and over again. It has cycled through a seemingly endless succession of global "seasons"-- each hundreds or thousands of years...
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Global Warming Coverage Melts Down - Not Fit to Print?
While the media have widely reported the fact that thousands of American scientists support global warming theory, press reports about the thousands who oppose the notion have been sparse. In the past two years, for example, some 17,100 American...
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Grandma Moses
The works of America's beloved Grandma Moses, who flourished despite the drive toward Modernism, are seen in a fresh light in a new touring exhibition. In 1940 American artists like Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning were struggling to redefine...
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Is Reform Possible? Spread across Dozens of Agencies, the UN System Attempts to Tackle Many of the World's Toughest Problems, with Uncertain Success
The answer to the question "Is reform possible?" is apparently yes. Five years ago, Sen. Jesse Helms (R-North Carolina) complained that "the United Nations has neither reformed nor has it died. The time has come for it to do one or the other. You could...
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Life Ever Difficult - Paradoxes of the Venetian Ghetto
I thought we were lost. Venice is like that. Dead-end alleys, numerous bridges, and canals straggle everywhere. Then I saw a sign reading "Sinagoge, monte d'arte ebraico." An arrow pointed toward the right. I indicated it to my husband, Gary: "We're...
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Milosevic on Trial - Milosevic's Trial
UNITED STATES--Milosevic's extradition to the court in The Hague does not mean that all is well in the Balkans. Just south of the border in Macedonia civil war lurks; a Slavic mob, made incandescent by Western coddling of Albanian rebels, may have...
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Monitoring Coral Reefs from Space
The latest advances in high-resolution satellite imagery are lending an enormous boost to the study and protection of coral reef ecosystems. When most people think of coral reefs, they envision unique types of fish, lobsters, and other exotic marine...
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Oil: America's Expensive Lifeblood
Three dollars a gallon! In the not too distant past, the idea of such a price for unleaded regular gasoline was preposterous, yet earlier this year it was a USA Today headline. What happened? The answers lie in well-intended but havoc-wreaking regulations,...
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Oil: America's Expensive Lifeblood - New Oil from Alaska?
Backers of oil exploration and production in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) cite the following points to press their case: * Only a tiny portion of the refuge would be explored. About 1.5 million acres (8 percent of the refuge)...
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Scintillating Sydney - Australia's New Cultural Revolution
Shedding its provincial image, Sydney has become an arts mecca, with a stunning array of fine architecture, classical performances, and Aboriginal works. Visitors to Sydney, Australia, rarely hear "g'dye, mate," for locals are far more worldly than...
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Slim Pickings in Cannes
This year's festival was a lesson in disappointment, as flawed films were favored and some of the better ones were out of the running. As usual, there are two kinds of people at this festival," Taiwan film auteur Hou Hsiao-hsien commented during...
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Ten Mistakes in the Middle East
Moses made the first mistake. After going through all the trouble of convincing the pharaoh to let his people go and then leading them on that 40-year walk, he should have told his people to turn right rather than left when they finally reached the...
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The Melting Pot - Part I: Are We There Yet?
Anne Wortham is associate professor of sociology at Illinois State University. Part II of this article will be published in a subsequent issue. In the years following the American Revolution the expectation developed that over time the best traditions...
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The New Future of Magnetism
By learning to control the formation of magnets at the atomic level, researchers are opening the way to stronger, smaller, lighter, and less expensive magnets that will support a profound redesign of machines ranging from cars to VCRs, robots, and...
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The New Future of Magnetism - the Roots of Magnetism
The invisible forces between two magnets bring out the curious child in all of us, compelling us to explore and play with them. Probing for the source of these forces, scientists find that they arise as the summation of minuscule fields from the hundreds...
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The Role of the United Nations
The Special Report this month is "Do We Need a United Nations?" I do not know that we absolutely need one, but a correctly used and limited United Nations could be useful. At the moment, many of us are rightly angry that the United States is no...
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The Straw Man of 'Race'
Jon Entine (http://www.jonentine.com) is the author of Taboo: Why Black Athletes Dominate Sports and Why We're Afraid to Talk About It (New York: Public Affairs, 2000). For a critical account of his work, see "Boos for Taboo: Taking Entine to Task,"...
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The UN Record - A UN-Type Collective Security System Cannot Be an Adequate Substitute for a U.S.-Led Alliance System in an Often-Chaotic World
Whether the United Nations should play a strong or only limited role in American foreign policy is a question that has long provoked fierce debate. Ever since President Woodrow Wilson unveiled his conception of the League of Nations at the end of World...
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The U.S. and the UN: Uneasy Partners - Although the United States Is Primarily Responsible for the Establishment of the UN, It Has Seldom Enjoyed Comfortable Relations with It
Have relations between the United States and the United Nations reached a low point? In the wake of the American failure to win reelection to the UN Human Rights Commission, many seem to believe that this is indeed the case. There are, of course, differences...
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To Toil with Vines - Hispanics and Napa Valley's Wineries
Eighty miles north of San Francisco, tucked away between hills and surrounded by vineyards, lies the little town of St. Helena. Once one of California's best-kept secrets, it is now the heart of the Napa Valley, a region famous for what one sign describes...
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Treasures in Wood and Stone - Historic Bergen, Norway
A UNESCO World Heritage site, Bergen's harbor district is a window to the days when the bustling Norwegian port town ruled north European trade. Not much has changed in venerable Vgen, the harbor of Bergen, Norway, since the Middle Ages, when all...
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Unraveling the Human Thread of Life
The project to determine the DNA sequence of every human chromosome is dramatically enhancing our ability to decipher our inner biological workings and to use the knowledge for our health and well-being. Imagine transporting yourself to the mid-nineteenth...
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Unraveling the Human Thread of Life - DNA Sequencing Technique
Frederick Sanger's DNA sequencing technique of 1977 has been upgraded and is widely used today. In a procedure that mimics DNA replication, the sample to be sequenced is used as a template from which complementary DNA strands are synthesized to varying...
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Unraveling the Human Thread of Life - Genome Sequencing Strategies
The Human Genome Project (HGP) and Celera Genomics chose different strategies to determine the human genome sequence. The HGP used "hierarchical shotgun sequencing," also called the "clone-by-clone" or "BAC-to-BAC" approach. DNA sequencing was preceded...
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Voting Virgin - an Ardent Alien's Confounding Quest for Citizenship
Anne R. Lawrence is a writer who hopes the next election will be less ... enthralling. Last year's presidential election may have been a fiasco, but for me it was an exhilarating one by simple virtue of the fact that it was the first time I'd ever...
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Working Wonders by Teaching Work Skills
The story of the Education and Employment Ministry (TEEM) is the story of a poorly educated, hard-drinking Oklahoma oil field roustabout who was inspired to become a Methodist pastor and start an inner-city outreach program to help welfare recipients...
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